Photo de l'auteur

George Eliot (1819–1880)

Auteur de Middlemarch

494+ oeuvres 54,619 utilisateurs 858 critiques 316 Favoris
Il y a 1 discussion ouverte sur cet auteur. Voir maintenant.

A propos de l'auteur

George Eliot was born Mary Ann Evans on a Warwickshire farm in England, where she spent almost all of her early life. She received a modest local education and was particularly influenced by one of her teachers, an extremely religious woman whom the novelist would later use as a model for various afficher plus characters. Eliot read extensively, and was particularly drawn to the romantic poets and German literature. In 1849, after the death of her father, she went to London and became assistant editor of the Westminster Review, a radical magazine. She soon began publishing sketches of country life in London magazines. At about his time Eliot began her lifelong relationship with George Henry Lewes. A married man, Lewes could not marry Eliot, but they lived together until Lewes's death. Eliot's sketches were well received, and soon after she followed with her first novel, Adam Bede (1859). She took the pen name "George Eliot" because she believed the public would take a male author more seriously. Like all of Eliot's best work, The Mill on the Floss (1860), is based in large part on her own life and her relationship with her brother. In it she begins to explore male-female relations and the way people's personalities determine their relationships with others. She returns to this theme in Silas Mariner (1861), in which she examines the changes brought about in life and personality of a miser through the love of a little girl. In 1863, Eliot published Romola. Set against the political intrigue of Florence, Italy, of the 1490's, the book chronicles the spiritual journey of a passionate young woman. Eliot's greatest achievement is almost certainly Middlemarch (1871). Here she paints her most detailed picture of English country life, and explores most deeply the frustrations of an intelligent woman with no outlet for her aspirations. This novel is now regarded as one of the major works of the Victorian era and one of the greatest works of fiction in English. Eliot's last work was Daniel Deronda. In that work, Daniel, the adopted son of an aristocratic Englishman, gradually becomes interested in Jewish culture and then discovers his own Jewish heritage. He eventually goes to live in Palestine. Because of the way in which she explored character and extended the range of subject matter to include simple country life, Eliot is now considered to be a major figure in the development of the novel. She is buried in Highgate Cemetery, North London, England, next to her common-law husband, George Henry Lewes. (Bowker Author Biography) afficher moins
Crédit image: Courtesy of the NYPL Digital Gallery (image use requires permission from the New York Public Library)

Œuvres de George Eliot

Middlemarch (1871) 17,792 exemplaires
Silas marner. (1861) 11,383 exemplaires
Le Moulin sur la Floss (1860) 8,748 exemplaires
Adam Bede (1859) 4,221 exemplaires
Daniel Deronda. (1876) 3,760 exemplaires
Felix Holt, the Radical (1866) 1,053 exemplaires
Scènes de la vie du clerge (1858) 874 exemplaires
The Lifted Veil [short fiction] (1859) 672 exemplaires
Silas Marner and Two Short Stories (1973) — Auteur — 299 exemplaires
The Lifted Veil / Brother Jacob (1999) 263 exemplaires
Selected Essays, Poems and Other Writings (1990) — Traducteur — 145 exemplaires
Brother Jacob (1878) 142 exemplaires
Adam Bede (Oxford World's Classics) (2008) 141 exemplaires
Middlemarch (1/2) (1893) 115 exemplaires
Impressions of Theophrastus Such (1879) 92 exemplaires
Middlemarch (2/2) (1872) 74 exemplaires
Silly Novels by Lady Novelists (1800) 67 exemplaires
Collected poems (1989) 66 exemplaires
100 Eternal Masterpieces of Literature - volume 1 (2017) — Contributeur — 58 exemplaires
Amos Barton (1857) 49 exemplaires
Daniel Deronda, Volume 1 of 2 (1876) 39 exemplaires
Silas Marner [Penguin Readers] (1965) 35 exemplaires
Janet's Repentance (2007) 27 exemplaires
Daniel Deronda, Volume 2 of 2 (1876) 26 exemplaires
The Spanish Gypsy (2008) 26 exemplaires
The Journals of George Eliot (1998) 25 exemplaires
Romola / Theophrastus Such (1889) — Auteur — 21 exemplaires
Adam Bede, Volume 2 of 2 (1999) 20 exemplaires
Romola (1/2) (1892) — Auteur — 20 exemplaires
Frommer's Day by Day: Stockholm (2009) 19 exemplaires
How Lisa Loved the King (2010) 17 exemplaires
Classics Illustrated: Silas Marner (1861) 17 exemplaires
Adam Bede, Volume 1 of 2 (1900) 17 exemplaires
Romola (2/2) (1887) — Auteur — 16 exemplaires
The Mill on the Floss (1/2) (1900) — Auteur — 15 exemplaires
Essays and leaves from a note-book (1883) 14 exemplaires
The Mill on the Floss (2/2) (1892) — Auteur — 14 exemplaires
The Works of George Eliot (2010) 13 exemplaires
Middlemarch (3/3) (2009) — Auteur — 13 exemplaires
Scenes of Clerical Life (1/2) (2015) — Auteur — 12 exemplaires
Daniel Deronda, Volume 3 of 3 (1910) 11 exemplaires
The George Eliot Letters (1954) 10 exemplaires
Middlemarch / Daniel Deronda (1899) 10 exemplaires
Romola (1/3) 9 exemplaires
O May I Join the Choir Invisible! (2010) 9 exemplaires
The Poems of George Eliot (1884) 9 exemplaires
Romola / Silas Marner — Auteur — 9 exemplaires
Felix Holt / Theophrastus Such (1885) — Auteur — 9 exemplaires
Works of George Eliot (1900) 9 exemplaires
Romola (3/3) 9 exemplaires
Miscellaneous Essays (1901) 9 exemplaires
Three nineteenth-century novels (1979) 8 exemplaires
Essays of George Eliot (1963) 8 exemplaires
Romola (2/3) 8 exemplaires
Tom and Maggie Tulliver (1909) 8 exemplaires
Wit and wisdom of George Eliot (1873) 8 exemplaires
Scenes of Clerical Life (2/2) — Auteur — 8 exemplaires
[unidentified works] 7 exemplaires
Silas Marner Longman Study Texts (1984) 7 exemplaires
Middlemarch (1/3) (2004) — Auteur — 7 exemplaires
The writings of George Eliot (1970) 7 exemplaires
Middlemarch (2/3) (2009) — Auteur — 7 exemplaires
Adam Bede / The Mill on the Floss / Romola (1893) — Auteur — 7 exemplaires
Silas Marner / Middlemarch (1964) — Auteur — 6 exemplaires
Silas Marner (2/2) (2003) 5 exemplaires
The Poetry of George Eliot (1900) 5 exemplaires
Eliot's works 5 exemplaires
Silas Marner / Brother Jacob (1970) — Auteur — 5 exemplaires
Gems from George Eliot 4 exemplaires
Novels of George Eliot 4 exemplaires
Edward Neville (1995) 4 exemplaires
Silas Marner (1/2) (2003) 4 exemplaires
El molino 3 exemplaires
The George Eliot Collection (2015) 3 exemplaires
Middlemarch (Advanced) (1981) 3 exemplaires
George Eliot's Works (1887) 3 exemplaires
The Mill on the Floss / Romola — Auteur — 3 exemplaires
Adam Bede | The Lifted Veil (1908) 3 exemplaires
Adam Bede | Felix Holt 3 exemplaires
George Eliot's Daniel Deronda: Abridged — Auteur — 3 exemplaires
Felix Holt; Poems (1900) 3 exemplaires
Collected works of George Eliot (2009) 3 exemplaires
Middlemarch | Romola 2 exemplaires
Works 2 exemplaires
The Best of George Eliot (2016) 2 exemplaires
Two Lovers (1909) 2 exemplaires
The Works of George Eliot (2) (1900) 2 exemplaires
Theophrastus Such / The Spanish Gypsy — Auteur — 2 exemplaires
Middlemarch - Books I - IV (2017) 1 exemplaire
Đ ł Ơ ư æ 1 exemplaire
Middlemarch 1 exemplaire
Middlemarch 1 exemplaire
Młyn nad Flossą 1 exemplaire
MIDDLEMARCH (1987) 1 exemplaire
Middlemarch D. 1 1 exemplaire
Silas Marner 1 exemplaire
Silas Marner (2023) 1 exemplaire
Romola Vol.1 & 2 1 exemplaire
Slias Marner Etc. 1 exemplaire
Pendennis Siles Marner (1910) 1 exemplaire
Four Quartets 1 exemplaire
Vodenica na Flosi 1 exemplaire
Romola. Vol. I 1 exemplaire
George Eliot's Life, Volume 2 (2018) 1 exemplaire
Six Pack 1 exemplaire
Middlemarch D. 2 1 exemplaire
Notes on Form in Art 1 exemplaire
Armgart 1 exemplaire
The Mill on the Floss 1 exemplaire
Romola (vols. 2 and 3 only) (1863) 1 exemplaire
Middlemarch. Vol.2 1 exemplaire
Silas Marner the Lifted Veil (2009) 1 exemplaire
Poems. Clerical Life 1 exemplaire
Early essays (1977) 1 exemplaire
Biographie 1 exemplaire
Famous Women 1 exemplaire
Essays, Volume II 1 exemplaire
Essays, Volume I 1 exemplaire
Silas Marner | Poems 1 exemplaire
Zu Gast in Weimar (2019) 1 exemplaire
Romola , Vol 1 (1900) 1 exemplaire
The Life of Jesus (2010) 1 exemplaire
Romola - Vols 1 & 2 (1900) 1 exemplaire
Silas Marner [Easy Classics] (1996) 1 exemplaire
Golden Grain 1 exemplaire

Oeuvres associées

Les quatre filles du docteur March (1868)quelques éditions26,584 exemplaires
Ethique (1677) — Traducteur, quelques éditions2,953 exemplaires
One Hundred and One Famous Poems (1916) — Contributeur, quelques éditions1,957 exemplaires
L'essence du christianisme (1841) — Traducteur, quelques éditions; Traducteur, quelques éditions897 exemplaires
The Treasure Chest (1932) — Contributeur — 260 exemplaires
The Norton Anthology of English Literature, 4th Edition, Volume 2 (1979) — Contributeur — 250 exemplaires
Wise Women: Over Two Thousand Years of Spiritual Writing by Women (1996) — Contributeur — 201 exemplaires
Atheism: A Reader (2000) — Contributeur — 184 exemplaires
The Portable Victorian Reader (1972) — Contributeur — 176 exemplaires
Aurora Leigh [Norton Critical Edition] (1996) — Contributeur — 173 exemplaires
Erotica: Women's Writing from Sappho to Margaret Atwood (1990) — Contributeur — 168 exemplaires
A Literary Christmas: An Anthology (2013) — Contributeur — 137 exemplaires
The Penguin Book of Women's Humour (1996) — Contributeur — 119 exemplaires
The Life of Jesus Critically Examined (1898) — Traducteur, quelques éditions; Traducteur, quelques éditions118 exemplaires
The Standard Book of British and American Verse (1932) — Contributeur — 116 exemplaires
The Lifted Veil: Women's 19th Century Stories (2005) — Contributeur — 114 exemplaires
Great English Short Stories (Dover Thrift Editions) (2005) — Contributeur — 39 exemplaires
Silas Marner (Radio Theatre) (2001) — Original novel — 38 exemplaires
Writing Politics: An Anthology (2020) — Contributeur — 36 exemplaires
Trial and Error: An Oxford Anthology of Legal Stories (1998) — Contributeur — 24 exemplaires
Women on Nature (2021) — Contributeur — 23 exemplaires
Nineteenth-Century Women Poets: An Oxford Anthology (1996) — Contributeur — 23 exemplaires
Silas Marner [1985 film] (2007) — Original novel — 20 exemplaires
Great English Short Stories (1930) — Contributeur — 20 exemplaires
Ghosts and Marvels (1924) — Contributeur — 17 exemplaires
Silas Marner | The Pearl (1959) 14 exemplaires
Wings Over the World (1942) — Contributeur — 13 exemplaires
An Adult's Garden of Bloomers (1966) — Contributeur — 7 exemplaires
Great Love Scenes from Famous Novels (1943) — Contributeur — 5 exemplaires
30 Eternal Masterpieces of Humorous Stories (2017) — Contributeur — 4 exemplaires
Famous Stories of Five Centuries (1934) — Contributeur — 4 exemplaires
The Word Lives On: A Treasury of Spiritual Fiction (1951) — Contributeur — 4 exemplaires
A Book of Narratives (1917) — Contributeur — 2 exemplaires
A Reader for Writers — Contributeur — 2 exemplaires
Maestros Ingleses, Tomo III (1962) — Contributeur — 2 exemplaires
Klassisia kauhukertomuksia (2021) — Contributeur — 2 exemplaires
Adam Bede: A Play — Auteur — 1 exemplaire
English short stories of the nineteenth century — Contributeur — 1 exemplaire

Étiqueté

Partage des connaissances

Nom légal
Evans, Mary Ann
Autres noms
Evans, Marian
Cross, Mary Anne
Date de naissance
1819
Date de décès
1880
Lieu de sépulture
Highgate, Londen
Sexe
female
Nationalité
Verenigd Koninkrijk
Pays (pour la carte)
England, UK
Lieu de naissance
Nuneaton, Warwickshire, England, UK
Lieu du décès
London, England, UK
Cause du décès
throat infection
Lieux de résidence
Nuneaton, Warwickshire, England, UK
London, England, UK
Études
Mrs. Wallington's School (Nuneaton, Warwickshire, England, UK)
Professions
novelist
editor
Relations
Lewes, George Henry (husband)
Cross, J. W. (husband)
Hennell, Sara (friend)
Spencer, Herbert (friend)
Evans, Gwyn (great-nephew)
Courte biographie
Mary Ann Evans (22 November 1819 – 22 December 1880; alternatively Mary Anne or Marian, known by her pen name George Eliot, was an English novelist, poet, journalist, translator and one of the leading writers of the Victorian era. She wrote seven novels, Adam Bede (1859), The Mill on the Floss (1860), Silas Marner (1861), Romola (1862–63), Felix Holt, the Radical (1866), Middlemarch (1871–72) and Daniel Deronda (1876), most of which are set in provincial England and known for their realism and psychological insight.

Although female authors were published under their own names during her lifetime, she wanted to escape the stereotype of women's writing being limited to lighthearted romances. She also wanted to have her fiction judged separately from her already extensive and widely known work as an editor and critic. Another factor in her use of a pen name may have been a desire to shield her private life from public scrutiny, thus avoiding the scandal that would have arisen because of her relationship with the married George Henry Lewes.

Middlemarch has been described by the novelists Martin Amis[3] and Julian Barnes as the greatest novel in the English language. Published under the name J. T. Colgan.

Membres

Discussions

Victorian Readalong Q4: Middlemarch by George Eliot à Club Read 2022 (Décembre 2022)
George Eliot and George Henry Lewes à Legacy Libraries (Mars 2022)
March 2021: George Eliot à Monthly Author Reads (Février 2022)
Group Read: Middlemarch, Second Thread à 75 Books Challenge for 2010 (Octobre 2018)
Middlemarch: The Chatty Bits (Spoilers Go Here) à The Green Dragon (Mars 2015)
Group Read, September 2014: The Mill on the Floss à 1001 Books to read before you die (Septembre 2014)
Middlemarch Group Read 2014 à 75 Books Challenge for 2014 (Août 2014)
Middlemarch group read à 2014 Category Challenge (Avril 2014)
Daniel Deronda à Geeks who love the Classics (Avril 2013)
Group Read: Middlemarch, Third Thread à 75 Books Challenge for 2010 (Février 2011)
Group Read: Middlemarch à 75 Books Challenge for 2010 (Novembre 2010)
***Group Read: Middlemarch Books 7-8 à 1001 Books to read before you die (Septembre 2010)
***Group Read: Middlemarch Books 5-6 à 1001 Books to read before you die (Août 2010)
***Group Read: Middlemarch Books 3-4 à 1001 Books to read before you die (Août 2010)
***Group Read: Middlemarch Prelude & Books 1-2 à 1001 Books to read before you die (Août 2010)
Middlemarch à Victoriana (Décembre 2009)
Middlemarch: Book I à Group Reads - Literature (Mai 2008)
Middlemarch (Spoilers Here) à Connecticut Nutmeggers (Mars 2008)
Middlemarch (SPOILER FREE) à Connecticut Nutmeggers (Août 2007)

Critiques

Je suis subjuguée par cette histoire depuis hier soir. Je l'ai ouvert et je l'ai terminé aujourd'hui (parce qu'entre temps j'ai du dormir, manger)(aller au travail, lire dans le parc à la pause de midi, revenir du travail, cela ne compte pas parce que j'ai lu à ce moment-là).

C'est une excellente nouvelle, très victorienne. Je crois que Mary Elizabeth Braddon ne l'aurait pas renié.

Latimer est un jeune homme qui se veut posséder l'âme romantique. Il en a l'âme mais malheureusement pas le génie créateur qu'il aspire pourtant à posséder. Il passe une jeunesse languissante en Suisse, une jeunesse faite de rêverie et de mélancolie. Un jour, il tombe malade. Son père le rejoint et l'aide pour sa guérison. Quand il se sent mieux, il s'aperçoit qu il a acquis un don : ce n'est pas celui de la création mais celui de la clairvoyance. Il a des visions et arrive à savoir ce que les gens pensent.

La première vision qu'il a est celle de la ville de Prague qu'il n'a jamais et qui s'avèrera exactement comme il l'a pensé le jour où il s'y rendra. La deuxième est la vision de la fiancée de son frère qu'il n'a absolument jamais vu et qui s'avèrera elle-aussi exactement comme il l'a vu.

De cette première vision de la fiancée, il tombera en amour. Ce n'est pas réciproque bien évidemment (il le sait parce qu'il le lit dans ses pensées). Pourtant, il a une vision qu'un jour elle sera sa femme. Manque de chance quand elle sera sa femme, ils ne s'entendront pas et elle souhaitera sa mort plus d'une fois. Il ne lui reste qu'à patienter pour voir son rêve s'accomplir même si il sait que cela va mener au désastre (Ah ces hommes ! ils ne sont pas compliqués du tout). Son frère meurt dans une chute de cheval. Le mariage va pouvoir avoir lieu ...

Le début est accrocheur (comme tout le reste de la nouvelle : il y a une montée du suspens qui est assez génial car le rythme ne faiblit jamais. Il n'y a pas vraiment de temps morts même si il y a parfois des petites leçons de vie) :

Ma fin est proche. Ces derniers temps, j'ai été sujet à des attaques d'angina pectoris et du train où vont les choses, si j'en crois mon médecin, j'ai lieu d'espérer que ma vie ne se prolongera pas au-delà de quelques mois. A moins que je ne sois affligé et physiquement et moralement d'une constitution exceptionnelle, je ne subirai plus bien longtemps l'odieux fardeau de cette existence terrestre. S'il devait en être autrement et que je vienne à atteindre l'âge désiré et envisagé par la plupart des hommes, je pourrais alors juger si les tourments de l'espérance déçue l'emportent sur ceux de la connaissance extra-lucide. Je prévois en effet l'heure de ma mort et le détail exact de mes derniers instants. Dans un mois jour pour jour, le vingt septembre mille huit cent cinquante, je serai assis dans ce même fauteuil, dans ce même cabinet de travail, à dix heures du soir, et j'attendrai la mort, las de cet éternel don de pénétration et de prévision, à bout d'espoir et d'illusion.

Moi j'y ai vu surtout une histoire pour dire que vivre il valait mieux ne pas tout savoir. Dans la postface de Marianne Tomi, on se rencontre qu'il peut y avoir plein de lectures possibles (et que d'après elle, c'est quand même pas le même niveau que Mary Elizabeth Braddon, trop populaire) : il y a des éléments biographiques dans le texte, une des leçons que l'on peut tirer est que Latimer cherche trop à avoir ce qu'il ne peut pas avoir : la femme de son frère, le don de créer...

Vous pouvez lire cette nouvelle comme moi, juste parce qu'elle est captivante et très bien écrite (en gros prendre cela comme un très bon divertissement) ou comme Marianne Tomi, en spécialiste de George Eliot, et trouver le texte intéressant mais pas majeur dans l’œuvre de l'auteur.
… (plus d'informations)
 
Signalé
CecileB | 25 autres critiques | Jul 23, 2012 |
Mon avis sur Middlemarch :

Le roman fait 1100 pages dans l’édition Folio (c’est un F17 !) alors forcément je ne sais pas par où commencé. D’après ce que Sylvère Monod explique, Middlemarch est né de la fusion de deux projets : décrire la vie d’un petite ville provinciale et parler des mariages d’une jeune femme qui voulait faire le bien autour d’elle. Tout de suite, cela m’a rappelé les deux livres d’Elizabeth Gaskell Cranford et Femmes et filles. Mais en réalité c’est très différent même si cela parle de la même chose.

Une partie du roman parle donc de la vie à Middlemarch, des hameaux et des domaines aux alentours. Ainsi, vous pouvez apprendre les méthodes pour combattre le cholera, comment était créé des hôpitaux, comment tout était financé, comment les médecins entre eux se faisaient la guerre (d’après ce que j’ai compris, c’est surtout parce que le cadre de leur profession n’était pas réellement défini) qui fréquentait les salles de jeu, comment choisir le meilleur cheval pour ne pas se faire arnaquer, comment certains propriétaires et fermiers craignaient le chemin de fer … Alors que dans Cranford, vous aviez un livre où n’apparaissait que des discussions de salons de thé et donnaient cette impression que tout ce jouait là, notamment les réputations des gens, dans Middlemarch, il y a une vraie vie de village ! Des décisions sont prises dans des conseils, les nobles demandent de l’aide à un homme spécialisé dans tout ce qui touche à la campagne (chaque propriétaire ayant son idée sur comment améliorer la vie des paysans vivant sur ses terres). Le roman de George Eliot vise à une description minutieuse et exacte de la vie de l’époque ; c’est un “roman-monde” (à l’échelle d’un village).

Pour ce qui est des histoires sentimentales, il y en a trois. D’abord, il y a celle de Dorothea, jeune femme qui souhaite par dessus tout faire le bien autour d’elle avec son argent, ou tout du moins que son existence ne soit pas vaine. Au début du roman, sir James Chettam est très amoureux d’elle (elle arrive même à lui faire construire des maisons neuves pour ses paysans) mais Dorothea le voit avec sa sœur Celia. Quand monsieur Casaubon, recteur de la paroisse de Lowick âgé d’une soixantaine d’années, arrive au domaine de Mr. Brooke, oncle de Dorothea, celle-ci en tomba folle amoureuse. Pas parce qu’il est beau, ou très sympathique ou quoi que ce soit du genre mais parce qu’il a un projet de livre hautement intellectuel, dont il rassemble la bibliographie depuis trente ans ! Dorothea l’épouse pour pouvoir aider le grand homme. Elle sera bien évidemment déçue par sa vie conjugale. Pourtant elle rencontrera Monsieur Ladislaw, cousin de Mr. Casaubon, avec qui elle aura beaucoup plus de point en commun mais qui déchaînera les passions à Middlemarch.

La deuxième histoire concerne Lydgate, médecin qui arrive à Middlemarch avec de hautes idées sur la médecine et la science, qui lui aussi rêve d’accomplir de grandes choses, et Rosamond Vincy, jeune fille élevée dans la haute idée d’elle-même et de ses mérites pourtant peu nombreux. Lydgate ne voulait pas se marier de suite car il voulait s’établir et se faire un pécule pour pouvoir se marier et surtout la femme qui lui apporterait tout son soutien . Rosamond elle tombe amoureuse du prestige qu’elle s’imagine que son mari a et pourra lui amener. Forcément elle sera déçue.

Il y a aussi l’histoire annexe de Fred Vincy, frère de Rosamond, et Mary Garth. Lui, au début du roman, est très dissipé, dépensier, joueur mais pour l’amour de sa belle il s’amendera. Celle-ci l’aidera a toujours resté dans le droit chemin.

On voit que George Eliot n’a pas cette vision idyllique du mariage qu’ont certains romanciers (elle s’attaque à mon avis de manière assez virulente à cette institution). Elle n’y voit pas forcément un accomplissement. La preuve en est que Dorothea est le plus à même de réaliser ses bienfaits quand elle est veuve et non remariée. Des mariages peuvent être heureux comme celui de Celia et sir James. Mais Celia s’épanouit en temps que mère et non en tant que femme. Elle est docile et reste soumise à son mari. Dans Middlemarch, George Eliot nous montre quand même deux couples très mariés.

Le seul défaut que l’on peut donner à mon avis à ce roman c’est la maladresse dans les transitions qu’Elizabeth Gaskell n’a pas à mon sens dans ses romans. George Eliot en général à la fin du chapitre (ou au début) se met à faire un discours très abstrait. Puis tout à coup, elle met une phrase en rapport avec ses personnages (lien plus ou moins lointain avec le discours qui précède) et hop voilà la transition.

En conclusion, je ne regrette pas d’avoir pris le temps de lire ce gros roman !
… (plus d'informations)
 
Signalé
CecileB | Jul 23, 2012 |
Le roman fait 1100 pages dans l’édition Folio (c’est un F17 !) alors forcément je ne sais pas par où commencé. D’après ce que Sylvère Monod explique, Middlemarch est né de la fusion de deux projets : décrire la vie d’un petite ville provinciale et parler des mariages d’une jeune femme qui voulait faire le bien autour d’elle. Tout de suite, cela m’a rappelé les deux livres d’Elizabeth Gaskell Cranford et Femmes et filles. Mais en réalité c’est très différent même si cela parle de la même chose.

Une partie du roman parle donc de la vie à Middlemarch, des hameaux et des domaines aux alentours. Ainsi, vous pouvez apprendre les méthodes pour combattre le cholera, comment était créé des hôpitaux, comment tout était financé, comment les médecins entre eux se faisaient la guerre (d’après ce que j’ai compris, c’est surtout parce que le cadre de leur profession n’était pas réellement défini) qui fréquentait les salles de jeu, comment choisir le meilleur cheval pour ne pas se faire arnaquer, comment certains propriétaires et fermiers craignaient le chemin de fer … Alors que dans Cranford, vous aviez un livre où n’apparaissait que des discussions de salons de thé et donnaient cette impression que tout ce jouait là, notamment les réputations des gens, dans Middlemarch, il y a une vraie vie de village ! Des décisions sont prises dans des conseils, les nobles demandent de l’aide à un homme spécialisé dans tout ce qui touche à la campagne (chaque propriétaire ayant son idée sur comment améliorer la vie des paysans vivant sur ses terres). Le roman de George Eliot vise à une description minutieuse et exacte de la vie de l’époque ; c’est un “roman-monde” (à l’échelle d’un village).

Pour ce qui est des histoires sentimentales, il y en a trois. D’abord, il y a celle de Dorothea, jeune femme qui souhaite par dessus tout faire le bien autour d’elle avec son argent, ou tout du moins que son existence ne soit pas vaine. Au début du roman, sir James Chettam est très amoureux d’elle (elle arrive même à lui faire construire des maisons neuves pour ses paysans) mais Dorothea le voit avec sa sœur Celia. Quand monsieur Casaubon, recteur de la paroisse de Lowick âgé d’une soixantaine d’années, arrive au domaine de Mr. Brooke, oncle de Dorothea, celle-ci en tomba folle amoureuse. Pas parce qu’il est beau, ou très sympathique ou quoi que ce soit du genre mais parce qu’il a un projet de livre hautement intellectuel, dont il rassemble la bibliographie depuis trente ans ! Dorothea l’épouse pour pouvoir aider le grand homme. Elle sera bien évidemment déçue par sa vie conjugale. Pourtant elle rencontrera Monsieur Ladislaw, cousin de Mr. Casaubon, avec qui elle aura beaucoup plus de point en commun mais qui déchaînera les passions à Middlemarch.

La deuxième histoire concerne Lydgate, médecin qui arrive à Middlemarch avec de hautes idées sur la médecine et la science, qui lui aussi rêve d’accomplir de grandes choses, et Rosamond Vincy, jeune fille élevée dans la haute idée d’elle-même et de ses mérites pourtant peu nombreux. Lydgate ne voulait pas se marier de suite car il voulait s’établir et se faire un pécule pour pouvoir se marier et surtout la femme qui lui apporterait tout son soutien . Rosamond elle tombe amoureuse du prestige qu’elle s’imagine que son mari a et pourra lui amener. Forcément elle sera déçue.

Il y a aussi l’histoire annexe de Fred Vincy, frère de Rosamond, et Mary Garth. Lui, au début du roman, est très dissipé, dépensier, joueur mais pour l’amour de sa belle il s’amendera. Celle-ci l’aidera a toujours resté dans le droit chemin.

On voit que George Eliot n’a pas cette vision idyllique du mariage qu’ont certains romanciers (elle s’attaque à mon avis de manière assez virulente à cette institution). Elle n’y voit pas forcément un accomplissement. La preuve en est que Dorothea est le plus à même de réaliser ses bienfaits quand elle est veuve et non remariée. Des mariages peuvent être heureux comme celui de Celia et sir James. Mais Celia s’épanouit en temps que mère et non en tant que femme. Elle est docile et reste soumise à son mari. Dans Middlemarch, George Eliot nous montre quand même deux couples très mariés.

Le seul défaut que l’on peut donner à mon avis à ce roman c’est la maladresse dans les transitions qu’Elizabeth Gaskell n’a pas à mon sens dans ses romans. George Eliot en général à la fin du chapitre (ou au début) se met à faire un discours très abstrait. Puis tout à coup, elle met une phrase en rapport avec ses personnages (lien plus ou moins lointain avec le discours qui précède) et hop voilà la transition.

En conclusion, je ne regrette pas d’avoir pris le temps de lire ce gros roman !
… (plus d'informations)
 
Signalé
CecileB | 330 autres critiques | Jul 23, 2012 |

Listes

Europe (1)
100 (1)
1870s (1)
AP Lit (3)
1860s (4)
My TBR (4)
1850s (1)

Prix et récompenses

Vous aimerez peut-être aussi

Auteurs associés

A.S. Byatt Introduction, Editor
Gaston Leroux Contributor
Sun Tzu Contributor
George Sand Contributor
Theodor Fontane Contributor
Sir Walter Scott Contributor
John Webster Contributor
Blaise Pascal Contributor
Jane Austen Contributor
Alphonse Daudet Contributor
Thomas Dekker Contributor
Henri Barbusse Contributor
Mary Shelley Contributor
Fyodor Dostoyevsky Contributor
Guy de Maupassant Contributor
Honore de Balzac Contributor
Emily Brontë Contributor
Anne Brontë Contributor
Honoré de Balzac Contributor
Arthur Machen Contributor
Washington Irving Contributor
Louisa May Alcott Contributor
Alexandre Dumas Contributor
H. P. Lovecraft Contributor
Edgar Allan Poe Contributor
E. M. Forster Contributor
Herman Melville Contributor
Lewis Carroll Contributor
Dante Alighieri Contributor
Leo Tolstoy Contributor
Joseph Conrad Contributor
Henry James Contributor
Homer Contributor
Aldous Huxley Contributor
Mark Twain Contributor
Gustave Flaubert Contributor
D. H. Lawrence Contributor
Victor Hugo Contributor
Marcel Proust Contributor
Bram Stoker Contributor
Jonathan Swift Contributor
Jack London Contributor
Henry Fielding Contributor
Arthur Conan Doyle Contributor
Theodore Dreiser Contributor
Stendhal Contributor
Andy Hopkins Adapted by
Jocelyn Potter Adapted by
Sue Saunders Adapter
R.T. Jones Introduction
Ludwig Feuerbach Contributor
Frederic Harrison Contributor
Tess O'Toole Introduction
J.W. Cross Editor
Justin Rainey Activities by
Maud Jackson Adapted by
Robert Hill Ativities by
Rosemary Ashton Introduction, Editor
Nadia May Narrator
Graham Handley Editor, Introduction
Beryl Gray Editor, Afterword
Robert Mathias Cover designer
Walter Ernest Allen Afterword, Introduction
George Levine Introduction
Megan McDaniel Introduction, Illustrator
R. M. Hewitt Introduction
Robin Jacques Illustrator
Terence Cave Editor, Introduction
Jordi Arbonès Translator
Adam & Eve Illustrator
Melanie Walz Herausgeber
Ned Halley Afterword
Kingsley Hart Introduction
Ronald Pickup Narrator
Alain Jumeau Translator
Kate Reading Narrator
W. L. Taylor Illustrator
Mason Cooley Introduction
Rick Ellis Cover Design
Elinor S. Shaffer Introduction
Monica Elias Illustrator
Elsie Tollet Translator
Michel Faber Introduction
Margaret Drabble Introduction
Penelope Fitzgerald Introduction
ג. אריוך Translator
Alex Struik Cover Design
Jessica Hische Illustrator
Francine Prose Introduction
Simon Brett Illustrator
Keith Carabine Series Editor
Gabriel Woolf Narrator
Ilse Leisi Translator
Juliet Aubrey Narrator
Thomas Creswick Cover artist
Max Wildi Nachwort
Margret Stevens Translator
Pierre Mornet Illustrator
Irmgard Nickel Translator
Mario Manzari Translator
Sylvère Monod Translator
Arthur A. Dixon Illustrator
Jennifer Egan Introduction
Frank Kermode Afterword
Håkan Tollet Translator
Wanda Fraiken Neff Introduction
Rainer Zerbst Translator
Arie Storm Afterword
Quentin Anderson Introduction
Gerald Bullett Introduction
David Russell Introduction
Rebecca Mead Foreword
Aune Tuomikoski Translator
Felicia Bonaparte Introduction
Carole Boyd Narrator
Jerome Beaty Afterword
Doreen Roberts Introduction
Kristian Wachinger Herausgeber
John Mullan Introduction
Nancy Henry Preface
Paul Montazzoli Introduction
David G. Pitt Introduction
Clarence Rowe Illustrator
Q. D. Leavis Introduction
Anna Bentinck Narrator
Andrew Sachs Narrator
F.E. Bevan Editor
Robert Herrick Introduction
J Bernard Davis Illustrator
Dinah Birch Introduction
Wray Manning Illustrator
John Constable Cover artist
Bel Mooney Introduction
David Daiches Introduction
Ian Stephens Illustrator
Louis Salomon Introduction
Alyson Macneill Illustrator
Margot Livesey Introduction
Jane Smiley Afterword
Curtis Dahl Foreword
Flo Gibson Narrator
Jozef Israëls Illustrator
W. D. Howe Editor
James Hill Cover artist
Carole Jones Introduction
Christian Bokelman Cover artist
Harry Brockway Illustrator
Henry King Illustrator (photos from film version)
Dorothea Barrett Introduction
Frederic Leighton Cover artist
John Ritchie Cover artist
Kathryn Hughes Introduction
Dinny Thorold Introduction
Josie Billington Contributor
H. R. Millar Illustrator
Hugh Thomson Illustrator
Jennifer Gribble Introduction
Charles Reid Illustrator
A.H. Buckland Illustrator
Grace Rhys Introduction
Annie Matheson Introduction
Bruce Pirie Narrator
Samuel Laurence Cover artist
Matthew Sweet Foreword
Esther Wood Contributor
Charles Lee Lewes Introduction
Rachel Lay Illustrator

Statistiques

Œuvres
494
Aussi par
57
Membres
54,619
Popularité
#274
Évaluation
4.0
Critiques
858
ISBN
2,445
Langues
27
Favoris
316

Tableaux et graphiques