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Dune (1965)

par Frank Herbert

Autres auteurs: Voir la section autres auteur(e)s.

Séries: Dune (1), Dune: complete chronology (13)

MembresCritiquesPopularitéÉvaluation moyenneDiscussions / Mentions
33,95255252 (4.27)7 / 954
Here is the novel that will be forever considered a triumph of the imagination. Set on the desert planet Arrakis, Dune is the story of the boy Paul Atreides, who would become the mysterious man known as Muad'Dib. He would avenge the traitorous plot against his noble family-and would bring to fruition humankind's most ancient and unattainable dream. A stunning blend of adventure and mysticism, environmentalism and politics, Dune won the first Nebula Award, shared the Hugo Award, and formed the basis of what it undoubtedly the grandest epic in science fiction.… (plus d'informations)
  1. 3110
    Fondation par Isaac Asimov (Patangel, JonTheTerrible, philAbrams)
    JonTheTerrible: The pace of these books are similar as well as the topics they cover: society and government. The science plays only a small role in both books but is present enough to successfully build the worlds in which the characters inhabit.
  2. 153
    Hypérion - 1 par Dan Simmons (corporate_clone)
    corporate_clone: It is difficult not to compare Dune and Hyperion, even though both series have major differences in terms of tone, style and philosophy. Those are two long, epic, elaborate and very ambitious sci-fi masterpieces where religion plays a key role. I would highly recommend the fans of one to check out the other.… (plus d'informations)
  3. 70
    The Faded Sun Trilogy par C. J. Cherryh (reading_fox)
    reading_fox: Same basic sort of premise - SciFi set on desert worlds inspires the rise of a galactic empire, but very different outcomes!
  4. 82
    La grande porte par Frederik Pohl (Vonini)
  5. 85
    Le château de Lord Valentin par Robert Silverberg (corporate_clone)
    corporate_clone: Both books are a subtle blend of science fiction and fantasy while being truly epic stories. Although Dune remains a superior literary achievement in my view, Silverberg's Majipoor series is a credible alternative.
  6. 30
    A Door Into Ocean par Joan Slonczewski (Utilisateur anonyme)
  7. 41
    Rituel de chasse par Sheri S. Tepper (MyriadBooks)
    MyriadBooks: For the description of the planet.
  8. 31
    Le nom du monde est forêt par Ursula K. Le Guin (andomck)
    andomck: Ecological science fiction.
  9. 20
    La splendeur du ciel par Kay Kenyon (amysisson)
    amysisson: Different in tone, but similar in scope, plus it's also about the lengths to which empires will go to maintain the status quo.
  10. 43
    Crépuscule d'acier par Charles Stross (hyper7)
    hyper7: Singularity Sky could have been set in the Dune universe.
  11. 21
    La Reine des Neiges par Joan D. Vinge (sandstone78)
    sandstone78: Similar tropes in the form of human computers and a native species capable of granting youth, and the powerful woman trying to breed a special child- The Snow Queen seems on one level a response to Dune, taking many of the same elements and twisting them around, while going in quite different directions in other ways.… (plus d'informations)
  12. 10
    Fever Crumb par Philip Reeve (themulhern)
    themulhern: Duncan Idaho is not so unlike Kit Solent
  13. 21
    The King Must Die & The Bull from the Sea par Mary Renault (themulhern)
    themulhern: Young man with special powers and noble blood overthrows the established order through cunning and charisma. In the process he changes his people and then the rot sets in.
  14. 21
    Le Grand Vaisseau par Robert Reed (Sandwich76)
  15. 10
    L'anneau-monde par Larry Niven (sturlington)
  16. 11
    The Broken God par David Zindell (whiten06)
    whiten06: Another coming-of-age story with the protagonist gaining god-like knowledge through the use of hallucinogens.
  17. 33
    L'Effet Lazare par Frank Herbert (d_perlo)
    d_perlo: So you have read Frank Herbert's Dune series and want more? Thy The Lazarus Effect, The Jesus Incident, and The Ascension Factor, also by Frank Herbert. This is his take on a water world.
  18. 12
    The Enterprise of Death par Jesse Bullington (Sandwich76)
  19. 23
    Fils des Brumes, Tome 1 : L'empire ultime par Brandon Sanderson (wvlibrarydude)
    wvlibrarydude: Substance gives power to individual. Lots of political intrigue with interesting characters.
  20. 24
    L'Invasion des ténèbres par Robert Jordan (LaPhenix)
    LaPhenix: Another messiah story drawing inspiration from similar sources.

(voir toutes les recommandations de 25)

1960s (20)
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Affichage de 1-5 de 552 (suivant | tout afficher)
It is the masterpiece it is by the sheer volume of concepts introduced at the time in the genre. Even though the book as actually a bit long, the final part of the book feels really rushed as there is so much important happening in just a few pages. On the to next book! ( )
  Guide2 | Dec 1, 2021 |
Flat characters, unexplored plot, shitty dialogue. I see where others have improved upon what has started, so i appreciate its influence. But i have no interest in continuing. Esp when ive read about how far off the rails this story goes.
This edition with the appendix was pretty helpful. ( )
  sambadoll | Nov 29, 2021 |
This was a book with some interesting concepts and ideas but also with some glaring flaws, which is why I can’t rate it higher than 2 stars. I saw the movie first and completely fell in love with it and that made me pick up the book, which has affected my enjoyment of said book. I will compare the book and the movie in this review because I can’t help myself. This is also a bit of a rant review, so this might not be for everyone.

I very much liked the idea of spice as the universe’s most valuable commodity used for space travel. The worldbuilding is incredibly interesting and I really love the politics and backstabbing that goes on.

The writing style in book 1 didn’t really work for me. I felt everything was very distant which makes me unable to get attached to the characters, which was a huge difference for me between the book and the movie. In the movie I really loved Duke Leto, in the books I didn’t feel like I got to know him at all, and so his death didn’t matter to me. It felt like the author tried to tell me how great he was, but he didn’t manage to show me what an amazing leader and father he was.

One of the reasons why this is, I believe, had to do with how the author choose to write his POV’s. We jumped so many times between the thoughts of all the characters that I never got to really know any of them. In some chapters, we would switch between people’s thoughts in every paragraph instead of sticking to one person, and this didn’t work for me as a reader. Eventually I learned to ignore this issue, but it did affect my overall enjoyment of both the book and the characters. This did get better in books 2 and 3.

One thing that I felt came completely out of the blue was the info dumping that happened when Liet-Kaynes died where he saw his father’s ghost (the fact that they changed this to a woman in the film was not a problem for me at all, both book and film needs more female representation). This brought me out of the story, and it felt like a desperate attempt from the author to give the reader this information. The way this was done, with the ghost (which was probably a hallucination) didn’t fit into the story in my opinion and brought me completely out of the setting and storytelling, and just felt weird.

The main issue I had in book 3 were the time jumps that I couldn’t follow. At some point we’re told that Alia is two years old and then some chapter later she is suddenly a four-year-old. It also felt like they skipped a lot of key moments because of these time jumps. There was also a two year gap between books 2 and 3 which was really disappointing. We never saw Paul and Jessica being included in the Fremen culture and learning their way of life or the developing relationship between Paul and Chania, they were suddenly together and had a son. And again this goes to the authors choice of writing the story by telling me instead of showing me, and that is a storytelling that doesn’t work for me.

Another thing that disappointed me a little was that we’re never explained what a mentat is. On one hand the fact that everyday concepts in this world, like mentats and shields etc. are never explained is good, because the people in the world already know what it is, but it’s also a two-edged sword because the reader doesn’t know what it is or how it works. Herbert introduce these interesting concepts, but never goes into detail about what they are or how they get to be that way, and I would have liked more information about this in some way. This was one of the reasons I wanted to read the book, because the movie never goes in dept either. I wanted more information but didn’t feel like I got it, I still don’t really understand what a mentat is or how they do what they do. The same with the school that Yeuh was trained at. We get some hints about it, but again it’s taken for granted that the doctors that comes out of this school cannot be corrupted, however that works. Maybe these things will be explained in later books.

Moving on to the Bene Gesserit and how they are utilized. The fact that you have these powerful women who are a part of an organization whose reach seems to be limitless, and they’re being used as broodmares to make this prophet be born (so that they can manipulate and use him), and to preserve other bloodlines, seems good in theory but doesn’t work so well in reality. Yes, they have other functions as well and can be very dangerous and crafty when needed. There is an argument to be had that this, having so much control over these bloodlines and noble houses, is a power in itself, which is true but I would still have liked to see much more of them and their capabilities, instead of them being in the background birthing babies.

Another issue I had was how Paul inherited the women of the man he killed in single combat. She had the choice of becoming either his lover/wife or his slave. He also inherited the man’s children. I know the book was written in 1965, but this notion that women are only valuable in relation to their man doesn’t work very well in 2021, and to be honest, I was kind of disappointed in the Fremen culture at this point. We have this warrior culture that can beat the Emperor’s best soldiers and only the men can fight, whereas the women are commodities that are owned by their men or sent away to the southern parts to rear the children.

Unfortunately, this book was a disappointment for me and I’m not sure if I’ll ever pick up another Dune book again. The movie on the other hand worked well for me. The emotion and storytelling there were done so well, they cut away most of the things I didn’t like about the book and I’m very much looking forward to watching Dune Part II and rewatch Part I. ( )
  fantasyaddict | Nov 28, 2021 |
This escaped my 1970s High School Sci-Fi radar. I saw the movie and then read the book and both were great. He created a universe that I am looking forward to reading in the next few books. Heros quest on a desert planet with some good philosophizing wound w in th enarrative. ( )
  JBreedlove | Nov 20, 2021 |
A little too much fantasy for me. First one is a classic. Second one starts to get a little been-there-done-that. I never bothered with any beyond that. ( )
  dualmon | Nov 17, 2021 |
Affichage de 1-5 de 552 (suivant | tout afficher)
Why is Blanch’s influence on Dune worth recognizing? Celebrating Blanch is not a means to discredit Herbert, whose imaginative novel transcends the sum of its influences. But Dune remains massively popular while The Sabres of Paradise languishes in relative obscurity, and renewed public interest in Blanch’s forgotten history would be a welcome development.

Isaac Asimov’s Foundation trilogy was famously inspired by Edward Gibbon’s Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire. J. R. R. Tolkien’s background in medieval languages helped shape the mythology of Middle Earth. Frank Herbert’s Dune is no different, and rediscovering one of the book’s most significant influences is a rewarding experience.
 
One of the monuments of modern science fiction.
ajouté par GYKM | modifierChicago Tribune
 

» Ajouter d'autres auteur(e)s (23 possibles)

Nom de l'auteur(e)RôleType d'auteurŒuvre ?Statut
Frank Herbertauteur(e) principal(e)toutes les éditionscalculé
Brick, ScottNarrateurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Cassidy, OrlaghNarrateurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
de Fontaine, DorothyMapauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Di Fate, VincentArtiste de la couvertureauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Dirda, MichaelIntroductionauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Guidall, GeorgeNarrateurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Herbert, BrianPostfaceauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Morton, EuanNarrateurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Pennington, BruceArtiste de la couvertureauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Schmidt, JakobTraducteurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Schoenherr, JohnArtiste de la couvertureauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Siudmak, WojciechArtiste de la couvertureauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Stuyter, M.K.Traducteurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Toivonen, AnjaTraducteurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Vance, SimonNarrateurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Weber, SamIllustrateurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
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Durant la semaine qui précéda le départ pour Arrakis, alors que la frénésie des ultimes préparatifs avait atteint un degré presque insupportable, une vieille femme vint rendre visite à la mère du garçon, Paul.
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Je ne connaîtrai pas la peur, car la peur tue l’esprit. La peur est la petite mort qui conduit à l’oblitération totale. J’affronterai ma peur. Je lui permettrai de passer sur moi, au travers de moi. Et lorsqu’elle sera passée, je tournerai mon œil intérieur sur son chemin. Et là où elle sera passée, il n’y aura plus rien. Rien que moi.
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If you are combining a translated copy please check carefully as in some languages this book was split into two volumes. In some languages there is a single volume edition and a split edition - you should only combine the single volume edition with the English edition. Languages known to have multiple-volumes: French, German,
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Here is the novel that will be forever considered a triumph of the imagination. Set on the desert planet Arrakis, Dune is the story of the boy Paul Atreides, who would become the mysterious man known as Muad'Dib. He would avenge the traitorous plot against his noble family-and would bring to fruition humankind's most ancient and unattainable dream. A stunning blend of adventure and mysticism, environmentalism and politics, Dune won the first Nebula Award, shared the Hugo Award, and formed the basis of what it undoubtedly the grandest epic in science fiction.

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