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Avec vue sur l'Arno (1908)

par E. M. Forster

Autres auteurs: Voir la section autres auteur(e)s.

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Classic Literature. Fiction. HTML:

A Room with a View is a romance and a social critique of Edwardian society. A young woman is chaperoned to Italy by her bitter aunt. There she meets an intriguing, but eccentric young man. Back in England she finds herself respectably engaged to a proper gentleman, but is thrown into a muddle when her young man from Italy moves to her English town. The novel celebrates the chaotic, unsure muddle of feelings over a kind of lifeless acceptance of the way things are.

.… (plus d'informations)
Récemment ajouté parMoosieMoo, bibliothèque privée, Bambean, AdaJane, RoXXieSiXX, jammysams, mistfantasy, Nahiyan., escapinginpaper, Abcdarian
Bibliothèques historiquesH.D., T. E. Lawrence
  1. 41
    Avril enchanté par Elizabeth von Arnim (SylviaC)
  2. 30
    Howards End par E. M. Forster (sturlington)
    sturlington: Where A Room with a View is comedy, Howards End is tragedy.
  3. 31
    Merchant Ivory's English Landscape par John Pym (carlym)
    carlym: [Merchant Ivory's English Landscape] includes quite a few photos from the movie version of [A Room with a View].
  4. 31
    Cold Comfort Farm par Stella Gibbons (upster)
    upster: It's refreshing and fun
  5. 10
    The House of Velvet and Glass par Katherine Howe (StarryNightElf)
    StarryNightElf: Two ladies travel in Europe during the Edwardian Era.
  6. 00
    Sex and Vanity par Kevin Kwan (nicole_a_davis)
  7. 00
    Monteriano par E. M. Forster (KayCliff)
Europe (8)
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Groupe SujetMessagesDernier message 
 Made into a Movie: A Room with a View1 non-lu / 12wonderY, Janvier 2016

» Voir aussi les 741 mentions

Affichage de 1-5 de 220 (suivant | tout afficher)
Realized I had never actually read this, just seen the movie. Gobbled it up in 2 enjoyable days. ( )
  Abcdarian | May 18, 2024 |
When English woman Lucy Honeychurch travels through Italy with her cousin and chaperone Charlotte Bartlett, they meet the Emersons, father and son, at their boarding house in Florence. The unconventional George Emerson kisses Lucy, and Charlotte whisks her off to Rome, but back in England, the Emersons take a house in the same village as the Honeychurches. Eventually, Lucy breaks off her engagement to Cecil Vyse, and almost flees to Greece to join the Miss Alans (also from the boarding house in Florence) before Mr. Emerson causes her to see that she and George are in love.

Quotes

"He has the merit - if it is one - of saying exactly what he means." (Mr. Beebe to Charlotte Bartlett, re: Mr. Emerson, 9)

Then the pernicious charm of Italy worked on her, and, instead of acquiring information, she began to be happy. (23)

"It is so sad when people who have abilities misuse them, and I must say they nearly always do." (Miss Alan, 39)

Why were most big things unladylike? (45)

This solitude oppressed her; she was accustomed to have her thoughts confirmed by others or, at all events, contradicted; it was too dreadful not to know whether she was thinking right or wrong. (54)

Happy Charlotte, who, though greatly troubled over things that did not matter, seemed oblivious to things that did... (64)

She recalled the free, pleasant life of her home, where she was allowed to do everything, and where nothing ever happened to her. (65)

...in Italy...her senses expanded; she felt that there was no one whom she might not get to like, that social barriers were irremovable, doubtless, but not particularly high. You jump over them...(127)

Indoors...she reflected that it is impossible to foretell the future with any degree of accuracy, that it is impossible to rehearse life. A fault in the scenery, a face in the audience, an irruption of the audience on to the stage, and all our carefully planed gestures mean nothing, or mean too much. (153)

Life is easy to chronicle, but bewildering to practice... (164)

"Every moment of his life he's forming you, telling you what's charming or amusing or ladylike, telling you what a man thinks womanly; and you, you of all women, listen to his voice instead of your own." (George Emerson to Lucy, 191)

"I have just used you as a peg for my silly notions of what a woman should be." (Cecil to Lucy, 199)

"'Life,' wrote a friend of mine, 'is a public performance on the violin, in which you must learn the instrument as you go along.'" (Mr. Emerson to Lucy, 233) ( )
  JennyArch | Apr 20, 2024 |
Accompanied by Charlotte, Lucy goes to Florence to find herself, and she learns about Italy's social culture. The story follows Lucy's character arc as she meets the men of Italy alongside Charlotte, whose English societal views start to change.


I received a free copy of this book via Booksprout and am voluntarily leaving a review. ( )
  Louisesk | Jan 26, 2024 |
Lucy Honeychurch, a young Englishwoman is in Italy among others of her class, all of whom have brought with them their social prejudices. A father and son of a lower social class offer her a room with a better view, an act that arouses suspicion in Lucy’s chaperone who sees lurid expectations attached to the offer and doesn’t want to endanger themselves. As several other rules become breached, Lucy fears for her good name. The Edwardian England moral code, outrageous to a present-day American, presents a big issue for Lucy. Forster’s style, heavy on dialogue, sometimes left me confused as to who was speaking. Also, he wove Greek myth into the narrative whose allusions I didn’t always understand. Nonetheless, the story is emotionally compelling and the theme of assessing one’s basic cultural beliefs resonates today.
( )
  dcvance | Dec 21, 2023 |
The name E.M. Forster summons up memories of high school advanced placement English class where my instructor would give us a 4-5 page piece of writing pulled from a novel and expect us to read, understand, converse wisely, and compose a 1,500 word essay on all its vague bits in just under 48 hours. I still have nightmares that I faked my way through that class.

A Room With a View is one of those novels that I knew was a classic and knew I read something about in high school but from which I chose to stay far away due to being tediously subjected to one of its dismembered parts my Senior year. When my daughter cosplayed Helena Bonham Carter a couple weeks ago, we took turns listing out her films and I was reminded that I'd seen photos online recently for this one. Searching my to be read shelves a few days ago after finishing The Scarlet Pimpernel, I came across this copy and, being in a mood, decided I'd give it a go.

I've never cared for the "Bloomsbury novel"---that gratingly philosophical piece of writing that skips around in time with no back story and feels no need to go into depth about settings and scenery. The conversations are filled with symbolic foreshadowing and the pages are filled with conversations. I never feel like I know where I'm at or who I'm with when I try to follow this sort of story. Maybe my imagination just isn't developed enough.

In this specific story, the author uses the character of old Mr. Emerson to tout his philosophical views about class, prejudice, love, equality, Feminism, and more. I suppose he's meant to be a voice to draw Lucy out of her 19th century suppressed female compliance, but from 2020, his final scene with her looks awfully male-dominated. Words that are meant to encourage her to follow her heart still don't give her room for much of an opinion and, as was the way of the time, she is silenced and told what she must think or feel. Because of this, it was difficult for me to see her as truly in love with her husband in the final scene. Instead, it seemed like a further stifling. There was so much melodrama throughout and I came away thinking that perhaps Lucy really never loved any man.

Besides the very random kiss in the violets (had to reread---is she dreaming? I need to watch the film maybe...), I thought that the first half of the book was better written than the first. Yet, something rebellious and secretly Feminist in me suddenly began loving the story for a minute as I observed Lucy's behavior toward Cecil in the wood. She pretends to forget Emerson's name---then corrects herself. But it's not a remembrance, it's a confession, and it's quite a romantic foreshadowing of things we already know are to come.

The ultimate question of the novel is this: would I rather be connected with a room or a view? The answer for most is, of course, a view---yet the ability to live in a view rather than a room is not easily obtainable for everyone. It requires risk, a strong sense of self, and sometimes the willingness to live lonely yet contented. The fact that Lucy got the view AND the happily ever after makes this novel handsome enough to tempt me into watching the 1985 film, as well.

Some of my favorite quotes include:

"Pull out from the depths those thoughts that you do not understand, and spread them out in the sunlight and know the meaning of them."

"But Italy worked some marvel in her. It gave her light and --- which he held more precious --- it gave her shadow. Soon he detected in her a wonderful reticence. She was like a woman of Leonardo da Vinci's, whom we love not so much for herself as for the things that she will not tell us."

"Mistrust all enterprises that require new clothes." (2020 masks? Ha!) ( )
  classyhomemaker | Dec 11, 2023 |
Affichage de 1-5 de 220 (suivant | tout afficher)
E M Forsters romantext präglas av en oerhört njutbar balans mellan utsagt och outsagt, mellan ytlig elegans och underförstådda referenser till en betydligt dunklare verklighet.
 

» Ajouter d'autres auteur(e)s (43 possibles)

Nom de l'auteurRôleType d'auteurŒuvre ?Statut
Forster, E. M.auteur principaltoutes les éditionsconfirmé
Bradbury, Malcolmauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Crossley, StevenNarrateurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Davidson, FrederickNarrateurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Ekman, MariaTraducteurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Harte, Glynn BoydIllustrateurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Lustig, AlvinConcepteur de la couvertureauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Shallenberg, KaraNarrateurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Simpson, MonaIntroductionauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Stallybrass, OliverDirecteur de publicationauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Stevenson, JulietNarrateurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Timonen, Hanna-LiisaTraducteurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Ward, CandaceDirecteur de publicationauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé

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"The Signora had no business to do it," said Miss Bartlett, "no business at all. She promised us south rooms with a view close together, instead of which here are north rooms, looking into a courtyard, and a long way apart. Oh, Lucy!"
A Room with a View was published in 1908. (Appendix)
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She joined the vast armies of the benighted, who follow neither the heart nor the brain, and march to their destiny by catch-words.
If Miss Honeychurch ever takes to live as she plays [piano], it will be very exciting both for us and for her.
She was like a woman of Leonardo da Vinci, whom we love not so much for herself as for the things that she will not tell us.
There is a certain amount of kindness, just as there is a certain amount of light,” he continued in measured tones. “We cast a shadow on something wherever we stand, and it is no good moving from place to place to save things; because the shadow always follows. Choose a place where you won’t do harm—yes, choose a place where you won’t do very much harm, and stand in it for all you are worth, facing the sunshine.”
It makes a difference, doesn’t it, whether we fence ourselves in, or whether we are fenced out by the barriers of others?
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Classic Literature. Fiction. HTML:

A Room with a View is a romance and a social critique of Edwardian society. A young woman is chaperoned to Italy by her bitter aunt. There she meets an intriguing, but eccentric young man. Back in England she finds herself respectably engaged to a proper gentleman, but is thrown into a muddle when her young man from Italy moves to her English town. The novel celebrates the chaotic, unsure muddle of feelings over a kind of lifeless acceptance of the way things are.

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