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Gaudy Night (1935)

par Dorothy L. Sayers

Autres auteurs: Voir la section autres auteur(e)s.

Séries: Peter Wimsey & Harriet Vane (3), Lord Peter Wimsey (12)

MembresCritiquesPopularitéÉvaluation moyenneDiscussions / Mentions
5,4131461,893 (4.31)1 / 526
Harriet Vane's Oxford reunion is shadowed by a rash of bizarre pranks and malicious mischief that include beautifully worded death threats, burnt effigies and vicious poison-pen letters, and Harriet finds herself and Lord Peter Wimsey challenged by an elusive set of clues.
Récemment ajouté parmcoverdale, rusnic2000, Meaghan007, Inakiaranguren, sharpwinter, JoeB1934, JFBCore, rebekahbar, bibliothèque privée
Bibliothèques historiquesBarbara Pym, Rex Stout, Anthony Burgess
  1. 50
    Ekaterin par Lois McMaster Bujold (PhoenixFalls)
    PhoenixFalls: A Civil Campaign is Lois McMaster Bujold's attempt to replicate Gaudy Night -- with an infusion of Georgette Heyer -- in her long-running Vorkosigan Saga.
  2. 30
    Les Aventures de Mary Russell et Sherlock Holmes : Le Cercle des héritières par Laurie R. King (zembla)
    zembla: Both feature good banter, a mystery set in a mostly-female environment, and a tentative romance between the sleuth protagonists.
  3. 30
    The Late Scholar par Jill Paton Walsh (merry10)
    merry10: The Late Scholar is Jill Paton Walsh's further exploration of Dorothy L. Sayers' themes in Gaudy Night.
  4. 20
    Lucky Jim. par Kingsley Amis (kraaivrouw)
  5. 20
    Death Among the Dons par Janet Neel (littlegreycloud)
    littlegreycloud: A murder mystery, an academic setting, an unusual heroine, a knight in shining armour (although John McLeish is more believable than Lord Peter;): check, check, check and check. But most importantly: really good writing.
  6. 32
    Le Collège de magie par Caroline Stevermer (bmlg)
    bmlg: lively and engaging depiction of the community of women scholars
  7. 10
    Un cas d'école par Michael Innes (themulhern)
    themulhern: "Death at the President's Lodging" is a more fun book about people running about an English college in the 1930s in the middle of the night.
1930s (93)
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» Voir aussi les 526 mentions

Anglais (138)  Allemand (3)  Danois (3)  Espagnol (1)  Suédois (1)  Toutes les langues (146)
Affichage de 1-5 de 146 (suivant | tout afficher)
If I had picked the books for the 1001 Books lists, I would have chosen this book first from this series, I think.
This is a story about a woman very much like the marginally educated Conservatives who vote for and blindly support political men like Donald Trump, and the lengths she would go to to destroy the modern world that she sees as responsible for her husband's poor choices and unfortunate end. This book takes on the issue of women's education and the role of women in society. The story is set in the 1930's as tensions are building on the Continent, and with the effects of Great Depression and WW1 launching more women into roles seen for generations as suitable only for men. Harriet gets to do most of the sleuthing herself in this book, too, while Peter is away dealing with international relations in France and Poland.

In this book, too, it is mentioned that Peter is 45yrs old. He always seems older to me, but he's not actually all that old after all. ( )
  JBarringer | Dec 15, 2023 |
Best crime novel I've ever read ( )
  mrsnickleby | Nov 12, 2023 |
God, this is a weirdly unpleasant book to read. Being set in a 30s Oxford college brings all kinds of class details to the fore that are obviously present in the other books in the series (I mean, the main character is a Lord) but that get shown up in the nitty-gritty. The kind Oxford dons generously take on women who are struggling with widowhood and bringing up children but they can only pay them a pittance because unfortunately the college finances are so difficult while they talk about openings of massive new buildings and gaudy decoration. One woman student comes under suspicion because some of her antecedents were "unrefined". The "scouts", which is an Oxford term for domestic servants apparently, are beneath suspicion because they're too stupid and annoying and need to be locked in at night for their own good.

And for someone who was an Oxford don herself it's strange the seeming contempt she has for the whole concept of a woman being a don. It's presented as if they're inherently weird creatures who've somehow been cut off from a normal life. A character is shown to be struggling with college life and isn't sure they want to do it but was encouraged to do it by her parents, who are both great advocates for women going into spaces they've previously been excluded from. This earns a withering rebuke from Harriet Vane who gets mad that someone like that could have possibly taken a space from someone - "it's alright when men come up and don't really care about the studies" she says. And it's obviously intended as a very unsubtle criticism of feminists of the time - obviously the woman actually wanted to be a cook or a nurse but was prevented from achieving her goals by her dastardly feminist parents! A woman at the college who makes a comment about men wanting to tear down women at college is obviously deeply disturbed with a mania against men. The woman who comes along to do a PhD at the college on a fellowship is treated as having some sort of weird obsession for doing so, even if Harriet Vane seems to like her.

And even in 1935 was it really reasonable to have the Reliable Working Class Man make a comment about "needing a Hitler" to put women in their place and present it in a light hearted way?

There's just a general *meanness* to the book that I don't think really comes across in any of the other books in the series. ( )
  tombomp | Oct 31, 2023 |
Dorothy L. Sayers was a snob of the highest order, and not at all my cup of tea. Don't get me wrong, I have nothing wrong with authors who are antiquated in style (Proust, one of my homeboys) or problematic (Woody Allen's comedy) or indeed high-and-mighty, antiquated, and problematic (my bookshelf is a shrine to Lawrence Durrell) but something about Sayers puts me off.

Is it her half-page epigraphs at the commencement of each chapter? Her rambling style? Her characters' proclivity to burst into Latin without a footnote, even in a modern edition (not necessarily a problem for a classicist such as myself, but still annoying)? Or the sheer audacity of a 520-page mystery novel? I mean, even at their best, these things - whether by Christie, Marsh, Tey, or Innes - were designed to be amusements to pass the time, not Tolstoy. Perhaps it's Harriet Vane's unwillingness to really get involved in solving the mystery, and leaving it up to her bf.

Either way, I didn't enjoy Sayers in highschool and I still don't care for Gaudy Night but I appreciate that - much like my willingness to get lost in Pym or Zola - for some, Sayers fits their heart and soul specifically. I'll stick to the other Golden Age crime writers, thanks. (Delectable speech by the non-murderer at the end, though!) ( )
  therebelprince | Oct 24, 2023 |
3.5 stars. An uninspired mystery but a fascinating window into women and career in the 1930s. And a fun romance ( )
  emmby | Oct 4, 2023 |
Affichage de 1-5 de 146 (suivant | tout afficher)

» Ajouter d'autres auteur(e)s (68 possibles)

Nom de l'auteurRôleType d'auteurŒuvre ?Statut
Dorothy L. Sayersauteur principaltoutes les éditionscalculé
Carmichael, IanNarrateurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
George, ElizabethIntroductionauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Juva, KerstiTraducteurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Ledwidge, NatachaIllustrateurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Ludwidge, NatachaIllustrateurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
McDowell, JaneNarrateurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
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The University is a Paradise. Rivers of Knowledge are there. Arts and Sciences flow from thence. Counsell Tables are Horti conclusi, (as it is said in the Canticles) Gardens that are walled in, and they are Fontes signati. Wells that are sealed up; bottomless depths of unsearchable Counsels there.

John Donne
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Harriet Vane sat at her writing-table and stared out into Mecklenburg Square.
[Introduction] I came to the wonderful detective novels of Dorothy L. Sayers in a way that would probably make that distinguished novelist spin in her grave.
[Author's Note] It would be idle to deny that the City and University of Oxford (in aeternum floreant) do actually exist, and contain a number of colleges and other buildings, some of which are mentioned by name in this book.
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'The social principle seems to be,' suggested Miss Pyke, 'that we should die for our own fun and not other people's.' 'Of course I admit,' said Miss Barton, rather angrily, 'that murder must be prevented and murderers kept from doing further harm. But they ought not to be punished and they certainly ought not to be killed.' 'I suppose they ought to be kept in hospitals at vast expense, along with other unfit specimens,' said Miss Edwards. 'Speaking as a biologist, I must say I think public money might be better employed. What with the number of imbeciles and physical wrecks we allow to go about and propagate their species, we shall end by devitalising whole nations.' 'Miss Schuster-Slatt would advocate sterilisation,' said the Dean. 'They're trying it in Germany, I believe,' said Miss Edwards. 'Together,' said Miss Hillyard, 'with the relegation of woman to her proper place in the home.' 'But they execute people there quite a lot,' said Wimsey, 'so Miss Barton can't take over their organisation lock, stock and barrel.'
`Were you really being as cautious and exacting about it as you would be about writing a passage of fine prose?’
‘That’s rather a difficult sort of comparison. One can’t, surely, deal with emotional excitements in that detached spirit’.
‘Isn’t the writing of good prose an emotional excitement?’
‘Yes, of course it is. At least, when you get the thing dead right and know it’s dead right, there’s no excitement like it. It’s marvellous. It makes you feel like God on the Seventh Day – for a bit, anyhow.’
‘Well, that’s what I mean. You expend the trouble and you don’t make any mistake – and then you experience the ecstasy. But if there’s any subject in which you’re content with the second-rate, then it isn’t really your subject.’
All the children seem to be coming out quite intelligent, thank goodness. It would have been such a bore to be the mother of morons, and it's an absolute toss-up, isn't it? If one could only invent them, like characters in books, it would be much more satisfactory to a well-regulated mind.
Detachment is a rare virtue, and very few people find it lovable, either in themselves or in others. If you ever find a person who likes you in spite of it--still more, because of it--that liking has very great value, because it is perfectly sincere, and because, with that person, you will never need to be anything but sincere yourself.
...never again would she mistake the will to feel for the feeling itself.
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Harriet Vane's Oxford reunion is shadowed by a rash of bizarre pranks and malicious mischief that include beautifully worded death threats, burnt effigies and vicious poison-pen letters, and Harriet finds herself and Lord Peter Wimsey challenged by an elusive set of clues.

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