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6+ oeuvres 131 utilisateurs 7 critiques

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Dr Gail Crowther is the author of several papers and chapters on Sylvia Plath. She has also written The Haunted Reader and Sylvia Plath (2017) and, with Elizabeth Sigmund, Sylvia Plath in Devon: A Year's Turning (2014), both published by Fonthill Media. Archivist Peter K. Steinberg is the author of afficher plus the 2004 biography Sylvia Plath published by Chelsea House, as well as articles and introductions to works by and about Sylvia Plath. He is co-editor of The Letters of Sylvia Plath (Faber). afficher moins

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This non-fiction book is a must read for those interested in the intersection of feminism and literature. A combination of biography and social commentary, Three-Martini Afternoons covers the lives of two renowned poets, Sylvia Plath and Anne Sexton, in a serious of straightforward chapters taking the reader on a parallel journey through their lives. While the book had a bit of an academic feel to it, I also found it very accessible, even to people who know nothing about either of these authors. Since both women struggled with mental illness, there are definitely some sad moments, as they were both so talented and yet, so troubled. Very well researched, respectful and fascinating reporting.… (plus d'informations)
 
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Anita_Pomerantz | 5 autres critiques | Mar 23, 2023 |
The organization — one aspect of their lives in each chapter — hollows out their stories. The impact of societal expectations of women in the 1950s and 60s, their marriage roles, mental illness (not addressed until the end of the book), etc. all impact each other. Stripping away all but one context at a time made their stories one-dimensional.

More than that, the author doesn’t leave it to the reader to come to their own conclusions. Rather, she’ll point out, for example, that we haven’t moved far beyond a particular outdated notion. When you come to this realization on your own, however, the impact is much more powerful.… (plus d'informations)
 
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maria514626 | 5 autres critiques | Jul 22, 2022 |
I really loved the layout of this both as a dual biography and chapter themes. I had no idea that Plath and Sexton knew each other and kind of adore the fact that they’d go have drinks after their writing class in 1959. This does a good job of going over their lives in regards to their writings and, as stated in the book, not backwards starting with their deaths. There’s no fancy gloss but good coverage of all issues, although I think that Ted Hughes was the absolute ultimate douchebag, and I’m not backing down on that.… (plus d'informations)
½
2 voter
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spinsterrevival | 5 autres critiques | May 26, 2021 |
This book serves as a sad reminder of how little some things have changed in the years since Sylvia Plath and Anne Sexton enjoyed drinks at the Ritz. You can read this book as a dual biography of the two poets, but it also details the way mental illness, motherhood, marriage, and suicide were regarded in the 1950s and 60s. The depictions of sexism made me angry and the limited understanding of mental illness (and the associated treatments) made me sad. By the end of this book, I was filled with a new admiration for these women, what they endured, and how they managed to create despite their circumstances. This book is very readable and highly recommended for anyone interested in either Plath or Sexton.… (plus d'informations)
1 voter
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wagner.sarah35 | 5 autres critiques | May 11, 2021 |

Statistiques

Œuvres
6
Aussi par
1
Membres
131
Popularité
#154,467
Évaluation
4.0
Critiques
7
ISBN
9

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