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Hier, les oiseaux (1976)

par Kate Wilhelm

Autres auteurs: Voir la section autres auteur(e)s.

MembresCritiquesPopularitéÉvaluation moyenneMentions
1,589608,631 (3.83)114
When the first warm breeze of Doomsday came wafting over the Shenandoah Valley, the Sumners were ready. Using their enormous wealth, the family had forged an isolated post holocaust citadel. Their descendants would have everything they needed to raise food and do the scientific research necessary for survival. But the family was soon plagued by sterility, and the creation of clones offered the only answer. And that final pocket of human civilization lost the very human spirit it was meant to preserve as man and mannequin turned on one another. Sweeping, dramatic, rich with humanity and rigorous in its science, Where Late the Sweet Birds Sang is widely regarded as a high point of both humanistic and hard science fiction. It won science fiction's Hugo Award and Locus Award on its first publication and is as compelling today as it was then.… (plus d'informations)
  1. 31
    Le Meilleur des mondes par Aldous Huxley (rat_in_a_cage)
    rat_in_a_cage: Hinweis auf Rückentext bei »Hier sangen früher Vögel«.
  2. 10
    The Long Tomorrow par Leigh Brackett (LamontCranston)
  3. 10
    Les Monades urbaines par Robert Silverberg (gaialover)
    gaialover: Dystopian society with controls against individualism and mandated polyamory.
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» Voir aussi les 114 mentions

Affichage de 1-5 de 60 (suivant | tout afficher)
Three and a half stars. ( )
  VictoriaGaile | Oct 16, 2021 |
This was the first book I read about cloning and, overall, it was an interesting story. It wasn't boring at all and it was a quick read (at least for me). I liked the multiple perspectives and the passage of time was well done in this book. There was a strong message: we must value individuality and creativity because if we were all the same the world would be a dull place.
Now that I've read an adult book about cloning, I'd love to read a YA one to see a different side on this subject. ( )
  _Marcia_94_ | Sep 21, 2021 |
For all the little ways this book is a bit dated, in greater ways it is insanely timely now in 2021: maybe even darkly prescient. Ecological collapse, global pandemic, official obliviousness to disaster, obsession...and that's just the first part. While other reviewers liken "Where Late The Sweet Birds Sang" to Miller's "A Canticle for Liebowitz" because it is in three parts, separated by passing time, and tells of humanity in the wake of apocalypse, that comparison only goes that far; in bucolic tone, human scale, empathy, and simply in the telling itself, this book is closer kin to Simak's "City," if more grim and cold. It's about what is left behind by those left behind, and looking forward is at best limited.

The post-apocalypse microcosm that makes up Parts 2 and 3 is both dystopic and dysfunctional, yet maintained by over-confident puppeteers too deeply invested to consider change. The attitudes and steps taken, if not the cloning and social experiment itself, are way too foreshadowed in the words and actions of a loud demographic currently in the USA:

"They were happy because they didn't have enough imagination to look ahead, he thought, and anyone who tried to tell them there were dangers was by definition an enemy of the community." (p.193)

Clunky science now and some awkward plot holes, but this little book needs to get dusted off and passed around. ( )
  MLShaw | Sep 2, 2021 |
An interesting story. I'm intrigued by the repeated themes of creation and destruction — not to mention their combination in the idea of flawed perfection, such as with Molly's portraits. David's attempt to destroy the mill when he realizes his clones are eliminating individuality dovetails nicely with Mark's destructive pranks later — which we learn are actually necessary to perpetuate humanity, as the clones do not have the imagination to see their own demise (another repeated theme, given that apparently only one extended family in the entire world has the foresight to establish a long-term, self-sustaining community to outlast the coming destruction). The end is clearly not an end, but another iteration in the cycle, although we might hope otherwise.

I particularly liked the way that Wilhelm wrote characters out of the story. Another writer might have been tempted to give a hint as to what happened to David or Molly and the others who leave. Except for the party that dies of radiation poisoning outside of Philly (a particularly disturbing image for me personally, as I was born in that great city!), we never get a clear idea about the fates of anyone who leaves the valley. The probability that they meet some doom lingers at the back of the mind throughout the story, yet there's always a glimmer of expectation that we might run across them at the end. Not knowing for sure is a more haunting proposition than revealing that they did indeed suffer some calamity, if only because there's the possibility that they did not.

Finally, Wilhelm does a great job at showing both the anxiety and inevitability (or inexorability) of parenthood. While we might like to think we have an influence on successive generations, ultimately they will do what they want themselves. The best we can do is to do the best we can do; rather than trying to force others, either older or younger, to do what we want, we should acknowledge our lack of power over the ever-slowly-changing zeitgeist and work to make things as good as we can. There's a huge potential for social commentary here — from the Baby Boomers retiring and its implication on job and retirement security for their kids and grandkids, to the ongoing developments in civil liberties...or violations thereof.

If I have a criticism of Wilhelm's book, it's that in some spots she seems to miss opportunities to make things a little clearer. In particular, many of Mark's movements seem a little too instantaneous, especially near the end, but even throughout the rest of the story there are places where physical or temporal jumps are made which aren't very clear. Also, in a few spots it would be nice to know how old some of the characters are — for the most part, it's not necessary, but having a better understanding of ages might also help to understand the relationships between some of the characters, especially since as we begin dealing with so many clones at various stages of development. All in all, though, these are relatively minor, but I feel it pulled me enough out of the story to make it not quite a 5-star rating: I'd give this 4.5 stars out of 5 if Goodreads allowed half-stars. ( )
  octoberdad | Dec 16, 2020 |
Sensible enough
more so than Clonus Horror
that's not saying much. ( )
  Eggpants | Jun 25, 2020 |
Affichage de 1-5 de 60 (suivant | tout afficher)
Mit großem erzählerischem Talent gelingt Kate Wilhelm eine glaubwürdige und spannende Dystopie, die völlig zu Recht zu den Klassikern der Science Fiction Literatur gezählt wird.
 
Fabulous story, deep thoughts cleverly disguised by amazing character development.
 

» Ajouter d'autres auteur(e)s (13 possibles)

Nom de l'auteur(e)RôleType d'auteurŒuvre ?Statut
Wilhelm, Kateauteur(e) principal(e)toutes les éditionsconfirmé
Chong, VincentArtiste de la couvertureauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Escher, M. C.Artiste de la couvertureauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Fields, AnnaNarrateurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Mahlow, RenéTraducteurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Morrill, RowenaArtiste de la couvertureauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Sargent, PamelaIntroductionauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Thole, KarelArtiste de la couvertureauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Tuttle, LisaIntroductionauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
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Locus ( [1977] | Novel | 1977)
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For Valerie, Kris, and Leslie, with love
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What David always hated most about the Sumner family dinners was the way everyone talked about him as if he were not there.
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In der zeitlosen Periode wurde das Leben selbst das Ziel, nicht die Wiederbeschaffung der Vergangenheit oder die raffinierte Planung der Zukunft.
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When the first warm breeze of Doomsday came wafting over the Shenandoah Valley, the Sumners were ready. Using their enormous wealth, the family had forged an isolated post holocaust citadel. Their descendants would have everything they needed to raise food and do the scientific research necessary for survival. But the family was soon plagued by sterility, and the creation of clones offered the only answer. And that final pocket of human civilization lost the very human spirit it was meant to preserve as man and mannequin turned on one another. Sweeping, dramatic, rich with humanity and rigorous in its science, Where Late the Sweet Birds Sang is widely regarded as a high point of both humanistic and hard science fiction. It won science fiction's Hugo Award and Locus Award on its first publication and is as compelling today as it was then.

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