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The 48 Laws of Power par Robert Greene
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The 48 Laws of Power (original 1998; édition 2000)

par Robert Greene (Auteur)

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4,230452,251 (3.94)19
Amoral, cunning, ruthless, and instructive, this piercing work distills three thousand years of the history of power into 48 well-explicated laws. It outlines the laws of power in their unvarnished essence, synthesizing the philosophies of Machiavelli, Sun-tzu, Carl von Clausewitz, and other great thinkers. Some laws teach the need for prudence, the virtue of stealth, and many demand the total absence of mercy, but like it or not, all have applications in real life. Illustrated through the tactics of Queen Elizabeth I, Henry Kissinger, P. T. Barnum, and other famous figures who have wielded--or been victimized by--power, these laws will fascinate any reader interested in gaining, observing, or defending against ultimate control.--From publisher description.… (plus d'informations)
Membre:cherrytomato
Titre:The 48 Laws of Power
Auteurs:Robert Greene (Auteur)
Info:Penguin Books (2000), Edition: 1st, 452 pages
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Power les 48 lois du pouvoir par Robert Greene (1998)

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The 48 Laws of Power by Robert Greene

Why I picked this book up: I am a clinical Psychologis. I grew up in LA County and work in a max security, level 4, prison. I once talked with an inmate porter who cleaned our hallway, bathroom and cleared trash. I often read and he asked me if I ever read one if Greene’s books. He named three of them and I started this one. This book as been banned from being read in prison. From the very. Evinning, Right away, I thought and felt this book was based on conniving, taking advantage of others, lying and myriad other negative things so I stopped reading it. It appeared to be pushing sin or at least amoral behavior. this us my 14th book is far in 2022. Having time to read recently, I figured I'd read it to see what other thoughts were in this book. This book has historical figures and examples of what they got from behaving in these ways.

Thoughts: I know manipulation is common and even pets can manipulate to get what they want but I do not want my children reading this book. I don't want my children to manipulate others, I want them to be honest, honorable, trustworthy and pure.

Why I finished this read: In spite of all the morally unacceptable thind a in these laws I finished because I wanted to orient myself to and observe the inmates I work around. I read this to educate myself on how some criminals think and behave.

I rated this book at a 1.5 stars because I do like like this root of these 49 laws. ( )
  DrT | Feb 17, 2022 |
Evil ( )
  Alexandro69 | Feb 12, 2022 |
https://nwhyte.livejournal.com/3842078.html

I read the first three chapters and put it down with no intention of resuming. I thought it was a repulsive book. It claims to be a self-help book about how to gain Power and be Powerful, illustrated by case studied of people who Obeyed or Transgressed the Laws of Power in history. Most of the self-help books that I have read at least pay lip service to becoming a better person, wanting to make the world a better place by your existence, finding and fulfilling your personal mission, that kind of thing. Greene is just interested in Power; he does not define it, just assumes that you want it too; there is no ethical framework here. It's rather sickening, and the worrying thing is that a lot of people seem to have bought and liked the book. I suspect that his historical analysis is bunk as well, but cannot be bothered to check any of the examples. ( )
  nwhyte | Jan 14, 2022 |
An immoral but true depiction of the ways of the powerful... ( )
  volfy | Jun 26, 2021 |
Early in my career, an executive arrived early to a meeting and asked one of the finance people for a department’s quarterly numbers. He listened, then nodded silently about the bad numbers. When the other people arrived, including the manager of the aforementioned department, he called the meeting to order.

He asked the manager for his quarterly numbers, though he already knew them. When the hapless manager finished his report, the executive glared at him across the table for a few seconds. Then he stood up, picked up the report, slammed it down on the table and said simply, “F**k!” It was a performance I will never forget. He was observing Robert Greene’s Law 17:

"Keep others in suspended terror: cultivate an air of unpredictability….

"You sometimes need to strike without warning, to make others tremble when they least expect it. It is a device that the powerful have used for centuries."

Robert Greene has been called “a modern Machiavelli” primarily because of his cult classic, The 48 Laws of Power. At its core, the book attempts the same thing Machiavelli’s book attempts: to describe how to get and keep power. It is not concerned in the least with morality.

Each chapter is only a few pages, and the book can easily be dipped into now and again, rather than read from front to back. A chapter will focus on one of the 48 laws, and each is composed of 5 subsections. First is the Law, a one-sentence statement of how to behave. Then follows Judgment, a brief, 2-3 sentence interpretation of the law.

Transgression of the Law, the third section, is usually a historical story about someone who failed to observe the law, and an interpretation of how that person could have saved himself from the consequences of the transgression.

Observance of the Law is also a historical story, but this time of a person who observed the law and the rewards reaped from doing so.

Finally is Keys to Power. Greene uses examples from history to explain how to observe the law, pitfalls to be wary of, and quotes and images to help further illustrate the law and its importance.

This isn’t Dale Carnegie. Most of the laws describe behavior that one might describe as immoral or deceitful. A few of the Laws:

Law 3: Conceal your intentions

Law 14: Pose as a friend, work as a spy

Law 33: Discover each man’s thumbscrew

Law 42: Strike the shepherd and the sheep will scatter

The 48 Laws of Power is considered by some to be an underground classic. I recommend it, and think it should be read in the same spirit as The Prince: you can follow all of the laws to the letter, pick and choose those you find to be useful, or learn why others might behave in ways you don’t quite understand. But, unlike The Prince, you probably know someone who has actually read it. ( )
  evenlake | Mar 23, 2021 |
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Amoral, cunning, ruthless, and instructive, this piercing work distills three thousand years of the history of power into 48 well-explicated laws. It outlines the laws of power in their unvarnished essence, synthesizing the philosophies of Machiavelli, Sun-tzu, Carl von Clausewitz, and other great thinkers. Some laws teach the need for prudence, the virtue of stealth, and many demand the total absence of mercy, but like it or not, all have applications in real life. Illustrated through the tactics of Queen Elizabeth I, Henry Kissinger, P. T. Barnum, and other famous figures who have wielded--or been victimized by--power, these laws will fascinate any reader interested in gaining, observing, or defending against ultimate control.--From publisher description.

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