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Le singe blanc (1924)

par John Galsworthy

Autres auteurs: Voir la section autres auteur(e)s.

Séries: A Modern Comedy (1), The Forsyte Chronicles (4)

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2851071,362 (3.74)38
It's 1922 and Fleur Forsyte is now married to Michael Mont. Fleur throws herself into the roaring 20s with the rest of London, taking life as it comes. But the marriage is haunted by the ghost of a past love affair, and however vibrant Fleur appears, those closest to her sense her unhappiness. Michael, devoted to Fleur but not blind to her faults, is determined to stand by her through anything. He also finds himself caught up in the tragic and poignant story of a young couple struggling for survival in an age of unemployment and extreme poverty.… (plus d'informations)
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» Voir aussi les 38 mentions

Affichage de 1-5 de 10 (suivant | tout afficher)
John Galsworthy (1867 - 1933) fue un novelista y dramaturgo británico, autor de "La Saga de los Forsyte", ciclo de ocho novelas que giran en torno a esta familia. Algunas de las narraciones de esta saga fueron llevadas al cine, e incluso en 1967 la BBC rodó una serie de televisión con ellas que recaudó premios como el BAFTA o el Emmy. Galsworthy recibió el Nobel de Literatura en 1932. ( )
  Eucalafio | Nov 2, 2020 |
Fleur, the selfish cow
unchanged, unlike her father
Soames is the good guy?! ( )
  Eggpants | Jun 25, 2020 |
This moves the story on and concentrates on Fleur and her husband. Fleur remains quite a shallow young lady, and she is set on collecting. Her collection includes the nice items she owns, but it also includes people who attend her salons and hearts. That of Wilfred is a case in point. She never goes as far as to have intimate relations with him, but she is not mature enough to dismiss him either. This is further complicated by the fact that he was her husband's best man and remains a close friend. Both the men come out of this a lot better than Fleur in terms of character. The white monkey of the title is a painting and that serves as an allegory of the society at the time they find themselves. This books has a wider range of non-Forsytes than the previous trilogy. Iy s none the worse for that.
Soames is now an elder statesman and he is a far more sympatheitic character than previously. He has softened, no matter how much he would say he has not. Although he does have a moment of triumph at the shareholders meeting that almost makes me want to cheer. ( )
  Helenliz | Jun 21, 2019 |
This first part of the second of three (!) trilogies concerning the Forsytes does not have the epic sweep or grandeur of 'The Forsyte Saga'. Many of the more dynamic characters of the previous books are marginalized or not present at all, leaving us with Fleur and Michael, and her father Soames.

The plot revolves around the question of Fleur's affections. Her husband, Michael, well remembers Fleur's sudden turn-around considering his suit and knows that her love for him, if there at all, is more of convenience than passion. Will she abandon him for another? Meanwhile, he introduces the wife of a former employee to a line of work not considered 'suitable' by the world at large. Soames tests his conscience when he finds out about a scandal after being newly appointed as trustee to a financial concern.

Everything and everyone is uneasy, it seems. The writing is far cry from the more modern styles of some of Galsworthy's contemporaries, but he hits on the unease and the open acknowledgement of moral ambiguity. The cracks that were appearing when Soames reflected with horror on all the common people strolling in Hyde Park are now ravines. A person's backgrounds and connections are no guarantee of their behavior, conversation is less about information and more about affect, and Soames' eyes, as well as others, are turned up to the sky and thinking of fire raining down from the skies.

That was the single most interesting thing about the novel to me. The first World War hardly received a mention, but it plays in the minds of the characters of 'The White Monkey'. The characters also know it is not the last war either. The advent of airplanes used in warfare and the possibility of bombs falling on London is reflected on more than once.

Overall, I liked the novel, but it was easy for me to occasionally forget about the book and move on to others for weeks at a time. These characters are worth further consideration, but they don't have the sparkle of Irene or June.

'A Modern Comedy'

Previous (The Forsyte Saga): 'To Let'

Next: 'The Silver Spoon' ( )
  ManWithAnAgenda | Feb 19, 2019 |
This book is the fourth in the Forsyte Chronicles, first in the second trilogy. We are now in the roaring 20's, and the book focuses on Soames and his daughter, Fleur, and her husband Michael. Fleur, like Soames, is a collector. However, where Soames collects paintings, Fleur collects people. Galsworthy shows how in this time right after WWI the young people had an "I don't care what they think" attitude. Fleur's husband, Michael, is a likable character, who is madly in love with his wife and will do anything to make her happy. Soames becomes a more sympathetic character in this book, as he tries to fend off scandal, with foreshadowing of the Great Depression that was to come. ( )
  NanaCC | May 16, 2016 |
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Nom de l'auteur(e)RôleType d'auteurŒuvre ?Statut
Galsworthy, Johnauteur(e) principal(e)toutes les éditionsconfirmé
Case, DavidNarrateurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé

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It's 1922 and Fleur Forsyte is now married to Michael Mont. Fleur throws herself into the roaring 20s with the rest of London, taking life as it comes. But the marriage is haunted by the ghost of a past love affair, and however vibrant Fleur appears, those closest to her sense her unhappiness. Michael, devoted to Fleur but not blind to her faults, is determined to stand by her through anything. He also finds himself caught up in the tragic and poignant story of a young couple struggling for survival in an age of unemployment and extreme poverty.

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