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Waiting for Coyote's Call: An Eco-memoir…
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Waiting for Coyote's Call: An Eco-memoir from the Missouri River Bluff (édition 2008)

par Jerry Wilson

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4526459,509 (3.55)15
Inspired by Henry David Thoreau, Aldo Leopold, and Annie Dillard, Jerry Wilson's eco-memoir Waiting for Coyote's Call covers twenty-five years of trying to live life leaving as small an environmental footprint as possible. Wilson encourages readers to think about their place in nature through his family's quest to live equably with the natural world on 160 acres of prairie and woodland near the Missouri River in South Dakota. Wilson chronicles how he built their eco-friendly solar home and set about returning the plowed-under prairie to its original state. He muses on the difficulties of doing this in the modern world, where time is ever-more precious and convenience often outweighs the benefits of traditional methods of life. Taking the reader on journeys through his "Big Woods," Wilson examines the wonder of the creatures that also make their home on the "North Forty," noting how all that life fits together. From delight in home-grown tomatoes and passing Sandhill cranes to fears about humans' interaction with the web of life, Wilson's twenty-five years on the Missouri River bluff spring off the page, mirroring the fawns' leaps and bounds viewed from his window. … (plus d'informations)
Membre:Poemblaze
Titre:Waiting for Coyote's Call: An Eco-memoir from the Missouri River Bluff
Auteurs:Jerry Wilson
Info:South Dakota State Historical Society (2008), Hardcover, 284 pages
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Mots-clés:memoir

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Waiting for Coyote's Call: An Eco-memoir from the Missouri River Bluff par Jerry Wilson

  1. 43
    Les Bisons du Coeur-Brisé par Dan O'Brien (lorax)
    lorax: Two memoirs about life and nature on the South Dakota prairie; Wilson's is more observational, O'Brien's more active. Both are attempting to undo the damage of decades of unsustainable farming and ranching, though O'Brien's approach may ultimately be more useful on a large scale.… (plus d'informations)
  2. 00
    "Almanach d'un comte des sables" suivi de quelques croquis par Aldo Leopold (WildMaggie)
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Affichage de 1-5 de 27 (suivant | tout afficher)
Cette critique a été écrite dans le cadre des Critiques en avant-première de LibraryThing.
Grounded in the experience of building a home and reclaiming a forest on a bluff on the Missouri River in South Dakota, USA, Jerry Wilson pens a meditation on the relationship between humans and the land that they seek to subdue. He reflects on the action without wisdom that colours so much of humanity's efforts to control and direct nature, and its resources.

Wilson combines a description of acquiring land, designing and building an eco-friendly house, the cycle of seasons, the history of settlement in the area, the natural environment, and his endeavours to establish a forest reserve and attempting to restrain the encroachment of red cedars.

A consistent theme is that of neither possessing or owning land, but caring for it as a trustee for future generations. Wilson commits himself to be sensitive and vulnerable to the natural world.

I enjoyed reading this book, and reflecting on my own responses to these issues in my own environment. This is a book to read slowly and thoughtfully.
  rodneyvc | Jan 5, 2012 |
Cette critique a été écrite dans le cadre des Critiques en avant-première de LibraryThing.
I've enjoyed slowly reading through Jerry Wilson's pensive account of his home territory. Sometimes these simultaneous inward and outward examinations founder under the weight of their own good intentions, or take too circuitous a route (or lack a destination entirely), but his prose is gentle on the ear, sober, thoughtful. He claims not to have a plan, but in fact he does; he's giving you a tour of his back 140 acres, introducing you to the animals and plants that are his community there. I was relieved to note that while he's clearly read Aldo Leopold, Thoreau, and the rest, he isn't attempting to be any of the authors within the established canon of naturalist writing.

Coyote's Call is about the life he and his family built on a plot of land that appealed to them - and to a family of coyotes. His account of life on the land follows the progress of the planning and construction (often by hand) of his home. Neighbors tell him about those who've come before, and passed through; he learns about the stones, the water, and the lay of sunshine on his property. Overall, although I found his style just a little too philosophical and idealistic for my taste, I still enjoyed his account of what must be a warm and comforting home, in a lovely place. ( )
  Kinniska | Nov 19, 2010 |
Cette critique a été écrite dans le cadre des Critiques en avant-première de LibraryThing.
I found this book quite interesting. It spoke of the Missouri River and how it has been threatened.
  GypsyJon | Mar 23, 2010 |
Cette critique a été écrite dans le cadre des Critiques en avant-première de LibraryThing.
A strong memoir, but not a classic like Dillard. Strong prose with vibrant images. Just wish I had received it as a book, not as an e-book. And the 30 day limit was annoying.
  Poemblaze | Jan 7, 2010 |
Cette critique a été écrite dans le cadre des Critiques en avant-première de LibraryThing.
In my past I have read Annie Dillard, Thoureau and Aldo Leopold and enjoyed them, some more than others. Jerry Wilson is right in there, amidst the great ones, but this eco-memoir is not of the caliber of Dillard or Leopold but ti is very good. Perhaps because it is set smack dab in the middle of the modern world I find myself regretting the degradation of our environment and hearken back to the 'good old days' of Muir and Dillards "Pilgrim At Tinmker Creek', but this story of his 25 years spent living on the Missouri is a fine read, showing that he has a sense of pride and passion about the river and the place.... ( )
  oldmanriver1951 | Aug 4, 2009 |
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Inspired by Henry David Thoreau, Aldo Leopold, and Annie Dillard, Jerry Wilson's eco-memoir Waiting for Coyote's Call covers twenty-five years of trying to live life leaving as small an environmental footprint as possible. Wilson encourages readers to think about their place in nature through his family's quest to live equably with the natural world on 160 acres of prairie and woodland near the Missouri River in South Dakota. Wilson chronicles how he built their eco-friendly solar home and set about returning the plowed-under prairie to its original state. He muses on the difficulties of doing this in the modern world, where time is ever-more precious and convenience often outweighs the benefits of traditional methods of life. Taking the reader on journeys through his "Big Woods," Wilson examines the wonder of the creatures that also make their home on the "North Forty," noting how all that life fits together. From delight in home-grown tomatoes and passing Sandhill cranes to fears about humans' interaction with the web of life, Wilson's twenty-five years on the Missouri River bluff spring off the page, mirroring the fawns' leaps and bounds viewed from his window. 

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