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La Séquestrée (1892)

par Charlotte Perkins Gilman

Autres auteurs: Voir la section autres auteur(e)s.

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2,6921214,335 (4.05)1 / 374
"The Yellow Wallpaper" is a 6,000-word short story by the American writer Charlotte Perkins Gilman, first published in January 1892 in The New England Magazine. It is regarded as an important early work of American feminist literature.Presented in the first person, the story is a collection of journal entries written by a woman (Jane) whose physician husband (John) has confined her to the upstairs bedroom of a house he has rented for the summer. She is forbidden from working and has to hide her journal from him, so she can recuperate from what he calls a "temporary nervous depression - a slight hysterical tendency," a diagnosis common to women in that period. The windows of the room are barred, and there is a gate across the top of the stairs, allowing her husband to control her access to the rest of the house.The story depicts the effect of confinement on the narrator's mental health and her descent into psychosis. With nothing to stimulate her, she becomes obsessed by the pattern and color of the wallpaper. "It is the strangest yellow, that wall-paper! It makes me think of all the yellow things I ever saw - not beautiful ones like buttercups, but old foul, bad yellow things. But there is something else about that paper - the smell! ... The only thing I can think of that it is like is the color of the paper! A yellow smell."In the end, she imagines there are women creeping around behind the patterns of the wallpaper and comes to believe she is one of them. She locks herself in the room, now the only place she feels safe, refusing to leave when the summer rental is up. "For outside you have to creep on the ground, and everything is green instead of yellow. But here I can creep smoothly on the floor, and my shoulder just fits in that long smooch around the wall, so I cannot lose my way."Wikipedia… (plus d'informations)
Récemment ajouté parbibliothèque privée, Emily_liz, RichardMorris, SwatiRavi, KaiStarkk, spygirl, Gumbywan, Litrvixen
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    sturlington: The Widow's House makes several allusions to "The Yellow Wallpaper."
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    MissBrangwen: Although they were written in different periods of time, both texts reminded me of each other because of their dealing with the female experience of confinement.
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1890s (16)
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An unnamed woman goes with her husband and family to a mansion in the country. The reason for the move is so she can recover from an unamed ailment of the nerves she got after having given birth to her first child.



So she is kept away from the rest of the family in an old room with yellow wallpaper. The windows are barred. She is to be kept isolated from everything that might upset her nerves.

But with nothing else to occupy her time and only minimal human contact she starts to think the yellow wallpaper is changing and that she can see figures moving about in there. She becomes convinced she must free them.

Her husband slowly but surely becomes her enemy as not only has he locked her up he also refuses to let her write.But she manages to hide her diary from her husband and starts describing her time in the room. And the story we are reading is her diary

"The Yellow Wallpaper" may be one of the creepiest short stories I have ever read.Very smart people might go on and on about how its a symbolic of the woman in the story being oppressed by the patriarcharal victorian society. And I guess it is all that too. seeing as its based on the authors own experience with a dumbass husband.

But when I read it I didnt think of any of that. To me it was pure psychological horror wich is something quite different from ghosts and vampires scaring you.With those you know why you are scared but in this type of story its a kind of creeping unease because its such a mundane thing as wallpaper but its made into something terrifying because you see it through the eyes of a (possibly) mad person.

All I can say I felt like I was inside the room with the narrator and the ending really stays with you.
( )
  Litrvixen | Jun 23, 2022 |
Another story about he slow process of loosing one's mind, it had a major twist and it took me a while to understand what really happened, but a great read. ( )
  Bookslesstravelled | Apr 15, 2022 |
I am trying to read more key feminist texts in 2020, and this has been on my list for a while. It did not disappoint; the emphasis on women's subjugation, lack of rights at the start of the 20th century, and some colonial elements rendered this short story powerful, and haunting. ( )
  sazruth | Apr 5, 2022 |
I originally read this story in 1994, and I welcomed the chance to revisit it with Sara Barkat's 2020 graphic novel that uses GIlman's full and complete text.

Such a creepy bit of psychological horror. It reminded me of the Lovecraftian works I've read recently, and it got me to wondering how much Gilman might have influenced Lovecraft. Sure enough, his mother knew her while she was a governess in Providence and Lovecraft is on record mentioning the story on several occasions.

Barkat's art is not as polished as I prefer, but it certainly adds a wonderful new dimension to Gilman's most unsettling prose. ( )
  villemezbrown | Mar 28, 2022 |
Interesting piece of short fiction about a woman living in a rented house. She seems to be suffering from depression, perhaps even post-partum depression because there is mention of a baby. Her physician husband alternately coddles her and dismisses her complaints. At his insistance they made their bedroom the old nursery at the top of the house which is papered with a hideous yellow paper. The paper has been torn off in spots. The narrator thinks the room must have been used by young boys but it becomes clear that someone else was confined here before the narrator came. As the days go by she becomes fixated on the design in the wallpaper. She believes there is a woman behind bars who tries to get out, especially at night. Is this a hallucination or is she projecting her own self on the design? And is her husband imprisoning her or is she imprisoning herself? There are no answers just more questions. ( )
  gypsysmom | Feb 20, 2022 |
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Nom de l'auteur(e)RôleType d'auteurŒuvre ?Statut
Gilman, Charlotte Perkinsauteur(e) principal(e)toutes les éditionsconfirmé
Barkat, SaraIllustrateurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Hedges, Elaine R.Postfaceauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
O'Farrell, MaggieIntroductionauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Potter, KirstenNarrateurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé

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to my mother, who encourages me [by Sara Barkat, illustrator of the unabridged graphic novel edition]
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It is very seldom that mere ordinary people like John and myself secure ancestral halls for the summer.
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There are things in that paper that nobody knows but me, or ever will.
It is the same woman, I know, for she is always creeping, and most women do not creep by daylight.
Personally, I believe that congenial work, with excitement and change, would do me good.
He is very careful and loving, and hardly lets me stir without special direction.
The color is repellent, almost revolting; a smouldering unclean yellow, strangely faded by the slow-turning sunlight.
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This is the short story, including the Feminist Press Reprint No. 3 edition (1973) and Virago Modern Classic No. 50 (1981). Please do NOT combine with any anthology or other collection, but only with other editions confirmed as having the same contents. Thank you.
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Wikipédia en anglais (2)

"The Yellow Wallpaper" is a 6,000-word short story by the American writer Charlotte Perkins Gilman, first published in January 1892 in The New England Magazine. It is regarded as an important early work of American feminist literature.Presented in the first person, the story is a collection of journal entries written by a woman (Jane) whose physician husband (John) has confined her to the upstairs bedroom of a house he has rented for the summer. She is forbidden from working and has to hide her journal from him, so she can recuperate from what he calls a "temporary nervous depression - a slight hysterical tendency," a diagnosis common to women in that period. The windows of the room are barred, and there is a gate across the top of the stairs, allowing her husband to control her access to the rest of the house.The story depicts the effect of confinement on the narrator's mental health and her descent into psychosis. With nothing to stimulate her, she becomes obsessed by the pattern and color of the wallpaper. "It is the strangest yellow, that wall-paper! It makes me think of all the yellow things I ever saw - not beautiful ones like buttercups, but old foul, bad yellow things. But there is something else about that paper - the smell! ... The only thing I can think of that it is like is the color of the paper! A yellow smell."In the end, she imagines there are women creeping around behind the patterns of the wallpaper and comes to believe she is one of them. She locks herself in the room, now the only place she feels safe, refusing to leave when the summer rental is up. "For outside you have to creep on the ground, and everything is green instead of yellow. But here I can creep smoothly on the floor, and my shoulder just fits in that long smooch around the wall, so I cannot lose my way."Wikipedia

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