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Crash en forêt (1987)

par Gary Paulsen

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Séries: Brian's Saga (1)

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17,902583282 (3.78)253
After a plane crash, thirteen-year-old Brian spends fifty-four days in the Canadian wilderness, learning to survive with only the aid of a hatchet given him by his mother, and learning also to survive his parents' divorce.
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» Voir aussi les 253 mentions

Anglais (575)  Polonais (1)  Toutes les langues (576)
Affichage de 1-5 de 576 (suivant | tout afficher)
Really well done. I really got into the character, and loved his thinking. ( )
  LaPhenix | Jul 8, 2024 |
This is a classic children's book in the adventure/survival genre. Brian is a 13-year-old boy who finds himself alone in a small plane above the Canadian wilderness, with the pilot dead from a heart attack.

You have to understand that Gary Paulsen is not a great writer. The writing is average at best, and the author often uses the technique of repeating the same observation several times in slightly different sentences. The book is also direct and simplistic, targeted to children rather than to the YA market.

Having said that, these flaws can be forgiven because this book has something valuable to offer: the tale of how Brian changes his mindset and gets attuned to the wilderness, in a world where the first pressing concern is getting food and the second protecting yourself against adverse weather and wild animals. In the beginning Brian is a scared child, and as the story advances he figures out the rules of this new environment and he changes to be able to survive. By the end we feel that, barring a tragic accident, he is will be able to cope with all the adversities the wilderness throws his way.

This is a short book, and one things get going the reading becomes fast and compulsive. Good for young, reluctant readers who enjoy adventure tales. ( )
  jcm790 | May 26, 2024 |
This is a book about Brian, a 13-year-old boy who survived a plane crash and has to survive the wilderness of Canada until his parents can find him. This is a good book to show students how much they know and how to use their funds of knowledge to be successful. Throughout this book, the reader can see the themes of survival resilience, and self-discovery. ( )
  jxm304 | Apr 28, 2024 |
Twelve-year-old city kid Brian Robeson is flying to visit his father for the summer after his parents' divorce. During the flight, the pilot has a heart attack, and Brian lands the plane, but has no idea where he is. He escapes the wreck and makes a shelter near a lake, and must figure out how to get food and start a fire with nothing but his hatchet as he hopes for rescue.

This was the book that the Homeschool Book Group chose from the book tasting, so I'm re-reading it for the first time since grade school. The premise is as gripping as I remember - a great hook for book-talking - but the sentences are short, declarative, and repetitive, very "Hemingway for Kids." Still, it's a classic for a reason, and retains its appeal with that speculative, what-if-it-were-me aspect.

Questions for book group:
--What do you think of the narrative style (close third person; short, declarative sentences)? How does it help create the atmosphere/mood of the story?
--If you could choose 3-5 items to have with you in a survival scenario like Brian's, what do you think would be most important?
--What does Brian think is "the most important rule of survival"? Do you agree? What does he learn to prioritize?
--Brian relies on information he's learned from watching nature shows on TV. What knowledge do you have that would help you in a survival scenario, and where did you learn it?
--Brian muses about good luck and bad luck. Can you think of something that happened in the story that seemed like bad luck at first, but had a good result (or vice versa)? [e.g. when the tornado comes through, it ruins Brian's shelter but reveals the Cessna]
--The story ends somewhat abruptly, soon after Brian gets the survival pack out of the downed plane and turns on the transmitter. What did you think of the ending? Were you surprised that the pilot who rescues Brian said they had given up the search a month or two ago?
--For much of the story, Brian's thoughts are primarily focused on survival, with thoughts of his parents fading into the background. What do you think about "the Secret" that causes Brian to be so angry at his mother? Do you think Brian's father knows?

Quotes

If you keep walking back from good luck, he thought, you'll come to back luck. (40)

Here, at first, it was silent, or he thought it was silent, but when he started to listen, really listen, he heard thousands of things. (41)

And he was, at that moment, almost overcome with self-pity. He was dirty and starving and bitten and hurt and lonely and ugly and afraid and so completely miserable that it was like being in a pit, a dark, deep pit with no way out. (70)

...he learned the most important rule of survival, which was that feeling sorry for yourself didn't work. (82)

He had gotten depressed thinking about how they hadn't found him yet, and when he was busy and had something to do the depression seemed to leave. (104)

He was not the same. The plane passing changed him, the disappointment cut him down and made him new. He was not the same and would never be again like he had been. (123)

Patience, he thought. So much of this was patience - waiting and thinking and doing things right. So much of all this, so much of all living was patience and thinking. (145)

The rifle changed him, the minute he picked it up, and he wasn't sure that he liked the change very much. (186)

Up and down, he thought. The pack was wonderful but it gave him and up and down feelings. (187)

He had not moved. It had all happened so fast that he hadn't moved. He sat...staring at the plane, not quite understanding it yet; not quite knowing yet that it was over. (190) ( )
  JennyArch | Apr 25, 2024 |
independent reading level: grade 4-12
awards:
John Newberry Award,
Dorothy Canfield Fisher Children's Book Award
  daylaj | Apr 24, 2024 |
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» Ajouter d'autres auteur(e)s (6 possibles)

Nom de l'auteurRôleType d'auteurŒuvre ?Statut
Gary Paulsenauteur principaltoutes les éditionscalculé
Coyote, PeterNarrateurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé

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secret, secret, oh the secret.
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To the students of the Hershey Middle School
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Brian Robeson stared out the window of the small plane at the endless green northern wilderness below.
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He could not play the game without hope; could not play the game without a dream. They had taken it all away from him now, they had turned away from him and there was nothing for him now. The plane gone, his family gone, all of it gone. They would not come. He was alone and there was nothing for him.
In measured time, forty-seven days had passed since the crash. Forty-two days, he thought, since he had died and had been born as the new Brian.
Many times he thought he would not make it.
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This LT work distinguishes Gary Paulsen's original 1988 novel, Hatchet, from later editions that include related readings. Thank you.
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After a plane crash, thirteen-year-old Brian spends fifty-four days in the Canadian wilderness, learning to survive with only the aid of a hatchet given him by his mother, and learning also to survive his parents' divorce.

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