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Enig Marcheur (1980)

par Russell Hoban

Autres auteurs: Voir la section autres auteur(e)s.

MembresCritiquesPopularitéÉvaluation moyenneMentions
1,2152213,150 (4.22)168
Describes Riddley Walker's attempt to understand the past and present of a world which continues to exist two thousand years after the ultimate catastrophe.
  1. 50
    Cartographie des nuages par David Mitchell (Rynooo, browner56, pfeldman)
    browner56: Highly imaginative works, particularly the phonetic recreations of the English language
  2. 50
    Un cantique pour Leibowitz par Walter M. Miller Jr. (amberwitch)
  3. 30
    L'orange mécanique par Anthony Burgess (fugitive)
  4. 20
    La Comédie Tragique ou la Tragédie Comique de Mr Punch par Neil Gaiman (alaskayo)
    alaskayo: Graphic novel centered around the immortal rapscallion Mr. Punch, and his friends, Pooty, their pig babby, and Drop John the Foller Man (or Mr On The Levvil, if you will).
  5. 20
    Postman par David Brin (reading_fox)
    reading_fox: Although the language is very different the themes are similar
  6. 20
    Lanark par Alasdair Gray (fugitive)
  7. 20
    La Route par Cormac McCarthy (Cecrow)
  8. 10
    The Wake par Paul Kingsnorth (spiphany)
  9. 10
    Temps futurs par Aldous Huxley (leigonj)
    leigonj: Ape and essence is Huxley's 'other' dystopian novel beside Brave New World, a story set in a post-apocalyptic world in a society which has regressed morally, as well as technologically, and developed its own religious beliefs based on the nuclear war that befell it.… (plus d'informations)
  10. 10
    Le livre de Dave : Une révélation du passé récent et de l'avenir lointain par Will Self (Michael.Rimmer)
  11. 10
    Pygmy par Chuck Palahniuk (fugitive)
    fugitive: The protagonist uses a fractured, and manufactured language which takes some getting used to.
  12. 10
    The Last English King par Julian Rathbone (isabelx)
    isabelx: Charcoal burners living and working the same way in mediaeval and post-apocalyptic settings.
  13. 00
    The Book of Koli par M. R. Carey (reading_fox)
    reading_fox: Very similar scenario, although RW has more explicitly devolved language and less tech.
  14. 00
    The Children's Hospital par Chris Adrian (sturlington)
  15. 00
    The Slynx par Tatyana Tolstaya (spiphany)
  16. 00
    Harvest par Jim Crace (spiphany)
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» Voir aussi les 168 mentions

Affichage de 1-5 de 22 (suivant | tout afficher)
I'd give Riddley Walker six stars if I could. This is one of the books that really had an impact on me growing up, and started to get me interested in the power of language. ( )
  bowendwelle | Apr 19, 2021 |
An amazing book. It’s written entirely in a fairly dense, invented dialect, and thick with symbolism, so it took some effort. But it was very rewarding and I’ve been thinking on it a lot since I finished it a few days ago. I gather that some editions have glossaries and explanatory notes, but mine does not. I did find this comprehensive set of annotations online, with contributions by the author, after I finished it. I’m glad I only saw it after I was done.

Here’s the first paragraph:

"On my naming day when I come 12 I gone front spear and kilt a wyld boar he parbly ben the las wyld pig on the Bundel Downs any how there hadnt ben none for a long time befor him nor I aint looking to see none agen. He dint make the groun shake nor nothing like that when he come on to my spear he wernt all that big plus he lookit poorly. He done the reqwyrt he ternt and stood and clattert his teef and made his rush and there we wer then. Him on 1 end of the spear kicking his life out and me on the other end watching him dy. I said, 'Your tern now my tern later.' The other spears gone in then and he wer dead and the steam coming up off him in the rain and we all yelt, 'Offert!'”

Harold Bloom put it on his canon long-list. ( )
  k6gst | Feb 12, 2020 |
This book is written in not just the "voice" but the spelling and language of a boy growing up in a unique, apparently post-apocalyptic culture in the region around what in our world is Canterbury in England. It is very cleverly done, and develops the culture and mythology of the culture very effectively, but I find it too depressing to enjoy reading. ( )
  antiquary | Dec 23, 2017 |
I have just finished reading the Folio Society Limited edition of Riddley Walker.
The post-apocalyptic theme is a common one in science fiction, but in Riddley Walker, it is approached in a unique way as it uses the language of the 44th. century rather than our own.
As a result, it is not a fast book to read, but you soon get used to the new words and altered definitions of known words. Just let your eyes flow across the words and the meaning seems to become clear. Checking the glossary at the end of the book would have helped, but I only found this after I had finished.
To describe it as a nitty-gritty version of the dystopian future is a gross understatement. The rough edges grate on your consciousness, and as a result it is probably a far more realistic version of this possible future than that portrayed by the more dramatic authors of the genre.
The FS edition is superb with its dark moody textural cover (and page edge washes), heavy paper and large type (helps ion reading the strange dialect). The illustrations by Quentin Blake perfectly fit the dialogue, and are at exactly the right place in the text.
A book that I will remember for a long time, and this edition is highly recommended. ( )
  wcarter | May 7, 2017 |
The tale itself is a short and slender one, but the way its told is an extraordinary literary achievement. The events of the book take place thousands of years after a nuclear war has destroyed civilization, and humans are living in a kind of Iron Age, dimly aware that mankind was once much greater, and trying to puzzle out the connections between that lost world and their own mucky one. The author immerses you in the look, feel and smell of this place. What is extraordinary is, the entire story is written in the dialect of the time--a kind of smashed English in which words have been broken and put back together many times, like bones that have been fractured and imperfectly set by someone over and over. Some of it will come to you from sounding the words phonetically, and some will come from repetition of the same phrases in different contexts. The hardest part for me were proper and place names-- I'm not overly familiar with the geography or proper names of England, which is where the story takes place. ( I had to look in the glossary to find out "rizlas" were cigarette papers.) The constant repetition wore me down after awhile, and sometimes it seemed like nothing was happening, the characters were just turning things over (and over and over) in their heads. Something truly momentous occurs at the end of chapter 16, and that was an "Aha!" moment for me. There were two Afterwords, a glossary and some notes at the end, and I might have had an easier time if I'd read them first, but I'm kind of glad I muddled through on my own. I will read it again now, and I'm sure I''ll pick up on things I missed the first time. Because the story is told first person by the title character, you really get to know him well and care about him--not so much the other characters. Strangely enough, the only secondary character I really felt anything for was a dog. This isn't an easy book to get through, but well worth the effort as I've never read anything like it. ( )
1 voter unclebob53703 | Nov 2, 2016 |
Affichage de 1-5 de 22 (suivant | tout afficher)
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» Ajouter d'autres auteur(e)s (12 possibles)

Nom de l'auteur(e)RôleType d'auteurŒuvre ?Statut
Hoban, RussellAuteurauteur(e) principal(e)toutes les éditionsconfirmé
Blake, QuentinIllustrateurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Gary, Kelli M.auteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Harman, DominicArtiste de la couvertureauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Marcellino, FredArtiste de la couvertureauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Mitchell, DavidPostfaceauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Richard, NicolasTraducteurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Roberts, AdamIntroductionauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Self, WillIntroductionauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé

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Jesus has said:
Blessed is the lion that
the man will devour, and the lion
will become man. And loathsome is the
man that the lion will devour,
and the lion will become man.

Gospel of Thomas, Logion 7
Translated by George Ogg
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To Wieland
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On my naming day when I come 12 I gone front spear and kilt a wyld boar he parbly ben the las wyld pig on the Bundel Downs any how there hadnt ben none for a long time befor him nor I aint looking to see none agen.
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O what we ben! And what we come to!
(p. 100)
Im so old you know my memberment is mosly gone I jus have bits of this and that in my head like meat and vedgerbels in a stew Im jus a old stew head is all I am.
(p. 149)
I dont have nothing only words to put down on paper. Its so hard. Some times theres mor in the emty paper nor there is when you get the writing down on it.
(p. 158)
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Describes Riddley Walker's attempt to understand the past and present of a world which continues to exist two thousand years after the ultimate catastrophe.

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