AccueilGroupesDiscussionsExplorerTendances
Site de recherche
SantaThing signup ends Monday at 12pm Eastern US. Check it out!
décliner
Ce site utilise des cookies pour fournir nos services, optimiser les performances, pour les analyses, et (si vous n'êtes pas connecté) pour les publicités. En utilisant Librarything, vous reconnaissez avoir lu et compris nos conditions générales d'utilisation et de services. Votre utilisation du site et de ses services vaut acceptation de ces conditions et termes.
Hide this

Résultats trouvés sur Google Books

Cliquer sur une vignette pour aller sur Google Books.

Chargement...

The Best American Science and Nature Writing 2007 (2007)

par Richard Preston (Directeur de publication)

MembresCritiquesPopularitéÉvaluation moyenneMentions
229393,240 (3.78)5
"Science is about not knowing and wanting badly to know. Science is about flawed and complicated human beings trying to use whatever tools they've got, along with their minds, to see something strange and new. In that sense, writing about science is just another way of writing about the human condition." -- from the introduction by Richard Preston The twenty-eight pieces in The Best American Science and Nature Writing 2007 span a wide range of topics, from the farthest reaches of space to the everyday world around us to the secrets hiddin in our own bodies. Michael Lemonick travels to an extinct volcano in Hawaii, where telescopes at the summit are providing researchers with a glimpse of the most distant galaxy ever seen -- and profound new insights into the creation of the universe. Neil deGrasse Tyson takes a sharp, witty look at Americans' delirium over space travel. And with surgical precision Michael Perry describes how a medical autopsy is performed. Dead men can tell tales. Here we also see examinations of the sometimes harmful impact of science on the natural world. Susan Casey gives an alarming portrait of plastic waste pollution in the world's oceans, including a dead zone in the mid-Pacific that's twice the size of Texas. Michael Shnayerson heads to West Virginia, where the Appalachians are being blasted at the rate of several ridgetops a week, all in the pursuit of ever-elusive coal. And Paul Bennett goes deep beneath Rome's streets, where cutting-edge excavation techniques are revealing newfound treasures in one of the world's oldest cities. A profile of a late, distinguished British ornithologist by John Seabrook reveals that the man's personal collection of bird skins, now in the British Natural History Museum, was largely stolen or bought and intentionally mislabeled. Richard Conniff visits a former Brooklyn social worker turned primatologist who has become a fierce advocate of the lemur. And Patricia Gadsby takes us into the kitchens of Europe's finest chefs to explain how the new field of molecular gastronomy is revolutionizing fine cuisine.… (plus d'informations)
Chargement...

Inscrivez-vous à LibraryThing pour découvrir si vous aimerez ce livre

Actuellement, il n'y a pas de discussions au sujet de ce livre.

» Voir aussi les 5 mentions

3 sur 3
I love this series, man. Always chock full of really interesting, thought-provoking pieces. ( )
  AlCracka | Apr 2, 2013 |
Couldn't finish. Richard Preston must have been in a rotten mood when he chose these essays: picking through Roman sewers, giant floating piles of trash, how terrorists might access nuclear material. ( )
  bexaplex | May 21, 2010 |
The Best American Series is an anthology published yearly by Houghton Mifflin of articles that appeared in magazines over the past year - it's kind of a "best of" for magazine articles, in case you didn't get a chance to read 100s of magazines this past year. This one is for science and nature, but they also have them for fiction, travel, comics, etc.. The first was for fiction since 1915, but starting around 2000 they really expanded the line, including one that has blog articles(!). The Science and Nature Writing series began in 2000 so this is the seventh book. It is my first of the Best American series, of which I hope there will be many more on my shelf.

There are 28 articles by 28 authors arranged in alphabetic order by the authors last name. It is a box of surprises and a bag of chips - one never knows what comes up next, once you start it's hard to stop. It's unlike a short story anthology, it's a unique experience to read magazine articles in book form without the glossy pictures, narrow columns and advertisements, it is easier and more enjoyable, sort of like Tivo, with the best of TV distilled down and all the commercials removed.

Articles about science often don't have longevity since things naturally change rapidly, and this book does have a few articles about current events that in a few years will be outdated, but most of the articles have longer appeal that will last at least another decade, and some are timeless in scope and artistic appeal. The articles are written for a popular audience, so for the general reader, they are easily accessible small windows into what's going on in the world today.

--Review by Stephen Balbach, via CoolReading (c) 2008 cc-by-nd ( )
2 voter Stbalbach | Mar 13, 2008 |
3 sur 3
aucune critique | ajouter une critique
Vous devez vous identifier pour modifier le Partage des connaissances.
Pour plus d'aide, voir la page Aide sur le Partage des connaissances [en anglais].
Titre canonique
Informations provenant du Partage des connaissances anglais. Modifiez pour passer à votre langue.
Titre original
Titres alternatifs
Date de première publication
Personnes ou personnages
Lieux importants
Évènements importants
Films connexes
Prix et distinctions
Épigraphe
Dédicace
Premiers mots
Citations
Derniers mots
Notice de désambigüisation
Directeur(-trice)(s) de publication
Courtes éloges de critiques
Langue d'origine
DDC/MDS canonique
LCC canonique

Références à cette œuvre sur des ressources externes.

Wikipédia en anglais (1)

"Science is about not knowing and wanting badly to know. Science is about flawed and complicated human beings trying to use whatever tools they've got, along with their minds, to see something strange and new. In that sense, writing about science is just another way of writing about the human condition." -- from the introduction by Richard Preston The twenty-eight pieces in The Best American Science and Nature Writing 2007 span a wide range of topics, from the farthest reaches of space to the everyday world around us to the secrets hiddin in our own bodies. Michael Lemonick travels to an extinct volcano in Hawaii, where telescopes at the summit are providing researchers with a glimpse of the most distant galaxy ever seen -- and profound new insights into the creation of the universe. Neil deGrasse Tyson takes a sharp, witty look at Americans' delirium over space travel. And with surgical precision Michael Perry describes how a medical autopsy is performed. Dead men can tell tales. Here we also see examinations of the sometimes harmful impact of science on the natural world. Susan Casey gives an alarming portrait of plastic waste pollution in the world's oceans, including a dead zone in the mid-Pacific that's twice the size of Texas. Michael Shnayerson heads to West Virginia, where the Appalachians are being blasted at the rate of several ridgetops a week, all in the pursuit of ever-elusive coal. And Paul Bennett goes deep beneath Rome's streets, where cutting-edge excavation techniques are revealing newfound treasures in one of the world's oldest cities. A profile of a late, distinguished British ornithologist by John Seabrook reveals that the man's personal collection of bird skins, now in the British Natural History Museum, was largely stolen or bought and intentionally mislabeled. Richard Conniff visits a former Brooklyn social worker turned primatologist who has become a fierce advocate of the lemur. And Patricia Gadsby takes us into the kitchens of Europe's finest chefs to explain how the new field of molecular gastronomy is revolutionizing fine cuisine.

Aucune description trouvée dans une bibliothèque

Description du livre
Résumé sous forme de haïku

Couvertures populaires

Vos raccourcis

Évaluation

Moyenne: (3.78)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2
2.5 1
3 5
3.5 6
4 16
4.5
5 5

Est-ce vous ?

Devenez un(e) auteur LibraryThing.

 

À propos | Contact | LibraryThing.com | Respect de la vie privée et règles d'utilisation | Aide/FAQ | Blog | Boutique | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliothèques historiques | Critiques en avant-première | Partage des connaissances | 164,368,827 livres! | Barre supérieure: Toujours visible