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Lord Peter et l'inconnu (1925)

par Dorothy L. Sayers

Autres auteurs: Voir la section autres auteur(e)s.

Séries: Lord Peter Wimsey (1)

MembresCritiquesPopularitéÉvaluation moyenneMentions
4,4921732,110 (3.67)475
Ian Carmichael is Lord Peter Wimsey, with Patricia Routledge as his mother, in this BBC radio full-cast dramatization. Wimsey's mother has heard through a friend that Mr. Thipps, a respectable Battersea architect, found a dead man in his bath, wearing nothing but a gold pince-nez. Lord Wimsey makes his way straight over to Mr. Thipps, and a good look at the body raises a number of interesting questions. Why would such an apparantly well-groomed man have filthy black toenails, flea bites and the scent of carbolic soap lingering on his corpse? Then comes the disappearance of oil millionaire Sir Reuben Levy, last seen on the Battersea Park Road. With his beard shaved he would look very similar to the man found in the bath--but is Sir Levy really dead?… (plus d'informations)
  1. 30
    Jeeves par P. G. Wodehouse (casvelyn)
    casvelyn: Lord Peter Wimsey and Bertie Wooster are rather similar characters, and they both have loyal and competent valets. Peter, of course, solves mysteries, while Bertie is more of a comic figure.
  2. 00
    Long Before Forty par C. S. Forester (themulhern)
    themulhern: The med school student Lord Peter interviewed could just as well have been C. S. Forester himself (before he dropped out of med school and became a novelist).
  3. 00
    A Test of Wills par Charles Todd (majkia)
    majkia: similar focus on shellshock.
  4. 01
    Le meurtre de Roger Ackroyd par Agatha Christie (cbl_tn)
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» Voir aussi les 475 mentions

Affichage de 1-5 de 173 (suivant | tout afficher)
Last year I read both [b:Strong Poison|246225|Strong Poison (Lord Peter Wimsey, #5)|Dorothy L. Sayers|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1486963427l/246225._SY75_.jpg|1121561], a later entry in this series, and [b:The Mutual Admiration Society: How Dorothy L. Sayers and her Oxford Circle Remade the World for Women|44287172|The Mutual Admiration Society How Dorothy L. Sayers and her Oxford Circle Remade the World for Women|Mo Moulton|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1553100507l/44287172._SY75_.jpg|68805017], and I couldn't help having both of these books in mind as I read [b:Whose Body?|192893|Whose Body? (Lord Peter Wimsey, #1)|Dorothy L. Sayers|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1387573241l/192893._SY75_.jpg|1090544].

Although this book is not as polished as Strong Poison, it is a clever and witty introduction to the premise and characters. Unlike many authors from the Golden Age of British crime fiction, Sayers includes references to social or political issues that were of interest or personal concern to her. In this volume she shares the lingering effects of what we now define as PTSD on veterans of World War I. She also addresses the continuing prevalence of anti-Semitism in English society of the time. And she unintentionally connects to our current age by having a coroner require that the courtroom windows be opened "because the flu is back".

For me, the inclusion of these realistic elements helps Sayers' books stand the test of time better than some of her contemporaries. It's not all just fluff and plot. Although it would be fun to read the entire series in sequence, I may jump ahead to [b:Gaudy Night|93575|Gaudy Night (Lord Peter Wimsey, #10)|Dorothy L. Sayers|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1388197565l/93575._SY75_.jpg|341789] next, as it is set in a fictional version of Somerville, the Oxford college attended by the women profiled in The Mutual Admiration Society. ( )
  BarbKBooks | Aug 15, 2022 |
"Such a quaint thing," said the Dutchess, "I thought I'd tell you. You know little Mr. Thipps?"
"Thipps?" said Lord Peter. "Thipps? Oh, yes, the little architect man who's doing the church roof. Yes. What about him?"

Mrs. Thromorton's just been in, in quite a state of mind."

"Sorry, Mother, I can't hear. Mrs. Who?"

"Throgmorton - Throgmorton - the vicar's wife." Mr. Thipps rang them up this morning. It was his day to come down, you know. He rang them up to say he couldn't. He was so upset, poor little man. He'd found a dead body in his bath."

"Sorry, Mother, I can't hear; found what, where?"

"A dead man, dear, with nothing on but a pair of pince-nez. Mrs. Throgmorton positively blushed when she was telling me. I'm afraid people do get a little narrow minded in country Vicarage."
  taurus27 | Jun 5, 2022 |
(22) This is the first book in the Lord Peter Wimsey series by Dorothy Sayers. Lord Peter Wimsey is a member of the nobility who also was an officer during WW1. He is the idle rich spending his time sleuthing, in part, to distract him from the shell shock he suffers from. This introduces him to the reader through a fairly simple case - a body is found in a bathtub in the apartment of an unassuming man at the same time a businessman disappears without a trace. The body in the bathtub is decidedly not this man - but who is he? And how do the two odd events relate. It seems the missing business man came home; took off all his clothes, slept in his bed and then .. just disappears. Peter and a policeman friend investigate and the solution is actually not hard to guess. My e-copy contained quite a bit of an excerpt from the next book in the series so I thought I had much more to read and then boom! not much more than 100 pages or so in .. this slim volume ended.

I would put this somewhere along the same degree of enjoyment as Rendell's Inspector Wexford, though perhaps I am a bit more partial to Sayers writing than Rendells in this serial form. But its a close thing. This was not nearly as good or rich as 'Gaudy Night,' but I get that it is just the first book in the series and that I should likely just keep reading and withhold judgement.

Not much more to say... I think I will probably dub 2022 as the year of mysteries for me. For whatever reason mystery and crime is what I am drawn to at this time in my life; I can't fight it. I just need to let it play out. I think I'll keep reading the series for a bit in lieu of Wexford which I've tired of. ( )
  jhowell | Apr 30, 2022 |
The stark naked body was lying in the tub. Not unusual for a proper bath, but highly irregular for murder -- especially with a pair of gold pince-nez deliberately perched before the sightless eyes. What's more, the face appeared to have been shaved after death. The police assumed that the victim was a prominent financier, but Lord Peter Wimsey, who dabbled in mystery detection as a hobby, knew better. In this, his first murder case, Lord Peter untangles the ghastly mystery of the corpse in the bath

Considering this is the first in the series, Wimsey (plus Bunter, plus the Duchess) are strong characters already, with Wimsey being presented with a dead body in a bathroom, whilst the police are investigating the disappearance of Sir Reuben Levy, a financier who disappeared whilst on a night out.

It's fairly evident the significance of the unidentified body, but it's just a case of proving it. The written confession unfortunately, comes late in the book, and is all but redundant, as the reader should have worked it all out for themselves by the time it comes out (and it's all done bar the shouting).




( )
  nordie | Apr 18, 2022 |
On second reading (this time via audio book), I still find Wimsey an utter delight -- I had forgotten or not noticed his interest in early printed works, so that just added to the story for me -- and I found myself chuckling at his witty conversation more than once. Also, I have missed Bunter.

That said -- wow, what a product of its time. While there was nothing fully anti-semitic expressed, the constant need to comment on one of the victim's Jewishness and offer sweeping stereotypical views caused me quite a bit of dismay. I'm taking the opportunity to explore how things I didn't consciously examine in my previous reading may have tainted my worldview, and we'll see how far I get in the re-read of the series.

Also, hilariously, the audio version that I listened to was a legitimately published copy, but had clearly been copied off the CD, including both the change-CD now prompts and a portion obscured by disk damage. It surprises me that a publisher would release digital content in such a poorly edited state. The reader also took some getting used to -- very British, very lugubrious and languid in his speech, with a great many mouth noises as the the tale progressed. Very... authentic. ( )
  jennybeast | Apr 14, 2022 |
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Nom de l'auteur(e)RôleType d'auteurŒuvre ?Statut
Sayers, Dorothy L.auteur(e) principal(e)toutes les éditionsconfirmé
Bayer, OttoTraducteurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Berg, DanielTraducteurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Bleck, CathieArtiste de la couvertureauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Case, DavidNarrateurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
George, ElizabethIntroductionauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Griffini, Grazia MariaTraducteurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Kendall, RoeNarrateurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
May, NadiaNarrateurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Rikman, KristiinaTraducteurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Werner, EdwardTraducteurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
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To M. J. Dear Jim: This book is your fault. If it had not been for your brutal insistence, Lord Peter would never have staggered through to the end of the enquiry. Pray consider that he thanks you with his accustomed suavity. Yours ever, D. L. S.
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'Oh damn!' said Lord Peter Wimsey at Piccadilly Circus.
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"Look here, Peter," said the other [Parker] with some earnestness, "Suppose you get this playing-fields-of-Eton complex out of your system once and for all. There doesn't seem to be much doubt that something unpleasant has happened to Sir Reuben Levy. Call it murder, to strengthen the argument. If Sir Reuben has been murdered, is it a game? and is it fair to treat it as a game?"
"That is what I'm ashamed of, really," said Lord Peter. "It IS a game to me, to begin with, and I go on cheerfully, and then I suddenly see that somebody is going to be hurt, and I want to get out of it." (Chapter VII, Leipzig: The Albatross 1938, p. 176)
"There's nothing you can't prove if your outlook is sufficiently limited."
"But when you can really investigate, Mr. Parker, and break up the dead, or for preference the living body with the scalpel, you always find the footmarks---the little train of ruin or disorder left by madness or disease or drink or any other similar pest. But the difficulty is to trace them back, merely by observing the surface symptoms---the hysteria, crime, religion, fear, shyness, conscience, or whatever it may be; just as you observe a theft or a murder and look for the footsteps of the criminal, so I observe a fit of hysterics or an outburst of piety and hunt for the little mechanical irritation which has produced it."
"All these men work with a bias in their minds, one way or another," he said; "they find what they are looking for."
"Yes, yes, I know," said the detective, "but that's because you're thinking about your attitude. You want to be consistent, you want to look pretty, you want to swagger debonairly through a comedy of puppets or else to stalk magnificently through a tragedy of human sorrows and things. But that's childish. If you've any duty to society in the way of finding out the truth about murders, you must do it in any attitude that comes handy. You want to be elegant and detached? That's all right, if you find the truth out that way, but it hasn't any value in itself, you know. You want to look dignified and consistent---what's that got to do with it? You want to hunt down a murderer for the sport of the thing and then shake hands with him and say, 'Well played---hard luck---you shall have your revenge tomorrow!' Well, you can't do it like that. Life's not a football match. You want to be a sportsman. You can't be a sportsman. You're a responsible person."

"I don't think you ought to read so much theology," said Lord Peter. "It has a brutalizing influence."
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Ian Carmichael is Lord Peter Wimsey, with Patricia Routledge as his mother, in this BBC radio full-cast dramatization. Wimsey's mother has heard through a friend that Mr. Thipps, a respectable Battersea architect, found a dead man in his bath, wearing nothing but a gold pince-nez. Lord Wimsey makes his way straight over to Mr. Thipps, and a good look at the body raises a number of interesting questions. Why would such an apparantly well-groomed man have filthy black toenails, flea bites and the scent of carbolic soap lingering on his corpse? Then comes the disappearance of oil millionaire Sir Reuben Levy, last seen on the Battersea Park Road. With his beard shaved he would look very similar to the man found in the bath--but is Sir Levy really dead?

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Tantor Media

2 éditions de ce livre ont été publiées par Tantor Media.

Éditions: 1400101646, 1400111307

 

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