AccueilGroupesDiscussionsExplorerTendances
Site de recherche
Ce site utilise des cookies pour fournir nos services, optimiser les performances, pour les analyses, et (si vous n'êtes pas connecté) pour les publicités. En utilisant Librarything, vous reconnaissez avoir lu et compris nos conditions générales d'utilisation et de services. Votre utilisation du site et de ses services vaut acceptation de ces conditions et termes.
Hide this

Résultats trouvés sur Google Books

Cliquer sur une vignette pour aller sur Google Books.

Morte d'Arthur, Le: King Arthur and the…
Chargement...

Morte d'Arthur, Le: King Arthur and the Legends of the Round Table (original 1485; édition 1962)

par Thomas Malory (Auteur)

MembresCritiquesPopularitéÉvaluation moyenneMentions
6,342491,264 (3.86)152
The legends of King Arthur and his knights of the Round Table have inspired some of the greatest works of literature--from Cervantes's Don Quixote to Tennyson's Idylls of the King. Although many versions exist, Malory's stands as the classic rendition. Malory wrote the book while in Newgate Prison during the last three years of his life; it was published some fourteen years later, in 1485, by William Caxton. The tales, steeped in the magic of Merlin, the powerful cords of the chivalric code, and the age-old dramas of love and death, resound across the centuries. The stories of King Arthur, Lancelot, Queen Guenever, and Tristram and Isolde seem astonishingly moving and modern. Malory's Le Morte d'Arthur endures and inspires because it embodies mankind's deepest yearnings for brotherhood and community, a love worth dying for, and valor, honor, and chivalry.… (plus d'informations)
Membre:marssaxman
Titre:Morte d'Arthur, Le: King Arthur and the Legends of the Round Table
Auteurs:Thomas Malory (Auteur)
Info:Signet (1995), Edition: Revised, 512 pages
Collections:Votre bibliothèque
Évaluation:
Mots-clés:Aucun

Information sur l'oeuvre

La Mort d'Arthure; the History of King Arthur and of the Knights of the Round Table, 3 Vols. par Sir Thomas Malory (1485)

  1. 40
    Le roi Arthur et ses preux chevaliers par John Steinbeck (caflores)
  2. 20
    Tristan: With the surviving fragments of the 'Tristran' of Thomas par Gottfried von Strassburg (Shuffy2)
    Shuffy2: See the similarities between the two love triangles of King Arthur, Lancelot, and Guenevere AND King Mark, Isolde, and Tristan
  3. 00
    Don Quichotte par Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra (CGlanovsky)
    CGlanovsky: Read the two concurrently and got a good sense of the kind of chivalric literature that gave birth to Quixote's madness.
Chargement...

Inscrivez-vous à LibraryThing pour découvrir si vous aimerez ce livre

Actuellement, il n'y a pas de discussions au sujet de ce livre.

» Voir aussi les 152 mentions

Affichage de 1-5 de 49 (suivant | tout afficher)
When I was in high school, I spent the summer reading Le Morte D'Arthur. It is probably still one of the best summers I've had. ( )
  zeropluszeroisone | Jan 30, 2022 |
The first English-language prose version of the Arthurian legend, completed by Sir Thomas Malory about 1470 and printed by William Caxton in 1485. The only extant manuscript that predates Caxton’s edition is in the British Library, London. It retells the adventures of the knights of the Round Table in chronological sequence from the birth of Arthur. Based on French romances, Malory’s account differs from his models in its emphasis on the brotherhood of the knights rather than on courtly love, and on the conflicts of loyalty (brought about by the adultery of Lancelot and Guinevere) that finally destroy the fellowship. ( )
  Marcos_Augusto | Oct 22, 2021 |
Full disclosure, I did not actually make it through reading this book - I only read to page 235 before I gave up and focused on enjoying Aubrey Beardsley’s illustrations. Malory may have been the driving force behind expanding the Arthurian mythos to include more adventures about King Arthur’s knights and in romanticising the ideals of medieval chivalry, but unfortunately that doesn’t make up for the fact that his writing style is completely obtuse and unpleasant to read. It’s amazing what punctuation (especially punctuation and formatting that’s tied to dialogue) will do for readability, and how a lack-there-of presents a barriere which modern readers are not going to enjoy. Malory’s language itself isn’t exactly modernized, which is expected in a text coming to us from the 1400s, but in this specific edition which was published in the 1890s (mine is a modern facsimile republication of course) I expected at least a modicum of modernization.

Yet my goal in purchasing this specific edition wasn’t really to read the stories of King Arthur and the knights of the Round Table, anyways. I’m pretty familiar with the majority of Arthurian lore already, and to a certain extent expected that the readability of this volume wasn’t going to be its shining glory; like most purchasers of this weighty book (I imagine), I got it because it reprinted in its entirety Aubrey Beardsley’s first major collection of literary artwork. Compared to some of Beardsley’s later work, the Arthurian collection does have a few downfalls: its scope is far too large for the young artist, and readers can tell that his creativity was taxed by the sheer number of titling pieces he had to produce. Yet the larger illustrations, even those which don’t depict specific scenes from the tales, are wonderful examples of Beardsley’s mastery of composition, linework, and balance of negative and positive space. Even though the smaller compositions quickly become repetitive and stray from depicting the chapters they’re assigned to that doesn’t stop them from being great examples of Beardsley’s unique style of art and a showcase of his artistic experimentation in book illustration. There’s something intrinsically attractive about books which include titling artwork, so I’m glad that the publisher chose to utilize this method to enhance his publication - even though it wasn’t particularly popular at the time or a guaranteed success when other methods of illustration were undoubtedly more popular. ( )
  JaimieRiella | Feb 25, 2021 |
King Arthur’s mythic Round Table – with Queen Gwynevere, Sir Launcelot, and the famous sword Excalibur – resounds through England’s history. They might be fable, or they might have a historical root. Either way, they make for a good telling and national myth. Sir Thomas Malory recorded these tales in book form in the late fifteenth century, and Keith Baines adapted these for modern languages in the mid-twentieth century. Their storytelling power remains full of intrigue and drama.

Be forewarned that these stories contain much conflict and fighting. They tell of a day where knights maintained the social order, and these knights maintained order amongst themselves by a code of honor. As abundantly repeated, Sir Launcelot was the most noble of these knights, second only in greatness to his son Galahad. The honor of knighthood achieved some level of eternality for these chaps and encourages the reader to aim for similar levels of greatness.

But this was no tranquil knighthood. These knights courageously entered into drama-filled situations and sought to resolve them honorably. Malory’s records delineate many of these dramas. In an era and country ruled by royalty, knighthood symbolized a nobility for the common man. (Unfortunately, in this era, women were excluded from such honors.) These tales form a founding myth of the English people, where in the absence of a democracy or a republic, the ambitious sought to serve the king – and by the king, the people.

Readers of this work should understand that this founding myth forms as much a part of British culture as the founding myth of the Revolutionary War does for the American people. Indeed, Great Britain still is subject to a heredity (though constitutional) monarchy which allegedly traces its origin back to Arthur. Hence this work provides many political, historical, and cultural insights in its contribution to literature.

Students of England or Western civilization will certainly benefit from studying this work. Also, generally educated readers will likely benefit from enhanced understanding of the unique British people. But philosophical understanding is not all there is. Readers will also find these stories entertaining as adapted by Baines into a fluent, modern tongue. They harken the human heart back to an era of chivalry and romance. This era may have never existed in history exactly as told, but it certainly dwells still in our hearts. Understanding that romance of honor will continue to benefit the modern reader if she/he chooses to spend their time seeking after Camelot. ( )
  scottjpearson | Dec 27, 2020 |
This is one of those books I'm glad I read, but it got old, fast. Its a classic for western literature, and its the inspiration for so many early modern fantasy writers. Unfortunately, I didn't like it. Between all the kings and knights, the countless jousting matches, and really unlikable characters, it I had a hard time reading this. Of course, the stories are drawn from oral tradition, the author, Malory, pretty much made up whatever he wanted and for late 15th century, nobody much cared about accuracy.

As for characters, the only one I really liked was Nyneve, who locked Merlin up in a caver for following her around (Merlin deserved it). ( )
  TheDivineOomba | Aug 22, 2020 |
Affichage de 1-5 de 49 (suivant | tout afficher)
aucune critique | ajouter une critique

» Ajouter d'autres auteur(e)s (57 possibles)

Nom de l'auteur(e)RôleType d'auteurŒuvre ?Statut
Malory, Sir Thomasauteur(e) principal(e)toutes les éditionsconfirmé
Agrati, GabriellaDirecteur de publicationauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Baines, KeithTraducteurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Beardsley, AubreyIllustrateurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Bryan, Elizabeth J.Introductionauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Budin, Stephanie LynnIntroductionauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Caxton, WilliamDirecteur de publicationauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Cooper, HelenDirecteur de publicationauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Cowen, JanetDirecteur de publicationauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Dillon, DianeArtiste de la couvertureauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Dillon, LeoArtiste de la couvertureauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Ferguson, Anna-MarieIllustrateurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Field, P. J. C.Editor.auteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Gibbings, RobertIllustrateurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Goodrich, Norma LorreDirecteur de publicationauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Graves, RobertIntroductionauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Jacobi, DerekNarrateurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Lumiansky, Robert M.Directeur de publicationauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Magini, Maria LetiziaDirecteur de publicationauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Matthews, JohnDirecteur de publicationauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Pollard, Alfred W.Directeur de publicationauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Rhys, ErnestDirecteur de publicationauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Rhys, JohnIntroductionauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Strachey, Sir EdwardDirecteur de publicationauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Vinaver, EugèneDirecteur de publicationauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Wright, ThomasDirecteur de publicationauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé

Est contenu dans

Contient

Fait l'objet d'une ré-écriture dans

Fait l'objet d'une adaptation dans

Est en version abrégée dans

A inspiré

Contient un commentaire de texte de

Contient un guide de lecture pour étudiant

Vous devez vous identifier pour modifier le Partage des connaissances.
Pour plus d'aide, voir la page Aide sur le Partage des connaissances [en anglais].
Titre canonique
Informations provenant du Partage des connaissances anglais. Modifiez pour passer à votre langue.
Titre original
Titres alternatifs
Date de première publication
Personnes ou personnages
Informations provenant du Partage des connaissances anglais. Modifiez pour passer à votre langue.
Lieux importants
Informations provenant du Partage des connaissances anglais. Modifiez pour passer à votre langue.
Évènements importants
Films connexes
Informations provenant du Partage des connaissances anglais. Modifiez pour passer à votre langue.
Prix et distinctions
Informations provenant du Partage des connaissances anglais. Modifiez pour passer à votre langue.
Épigraphe
Dédicace
Informations provenant du Partage des connaissances anglais. Modifiez pour passer à votre langue.
For Anna
To Frances Strachey
Her father inscribes this book
the introduction to which
could not have been now re-written
without her help
in making the ear familiar with words
which the eye can no longer read.
Premiers mots
Informations provenant du Partage des connaissances anglais. Modifiez pour passer à votre langue.
King Uther Pendragon, ruler of all Britain, had been at war for many years with the Duke of Tintagil in Cornwall when he was told of the beauty of Lady Igraine, the duke's wife.
Citations
Derniers mots
Informations provenant du Partage des connaissances anglais. Modifiez pour passer à votre langue.
(Cliquez pour voir. Attention : peut vendre la mèche.)
Notice de désambigüisation
Informations provenant du Partage des connaissances anglais. Modifiez pour passer à votre langue.
This is the entry for the complete, unabridged text. Please don't combine with selections or retellings!
Directeur(-trice)(s) de publication
Courtes éloges de critiques
Informations provenant du Partage des connaissances anglais. Modifiez pour passer à votre langue.
Langue d'origine
Informations provenant du Partage des connaissances anglais. Modifiez pour passer à votre langue.
DDC/MDS canonique
LCC canonique

Références à cette œuvre sur des ressources externes.

Wikipédia en anglais (2)

The legends of King Arthur and his knights of the Round Table have inspired some of the greatest works of literature--from Cervantes's Don Quixote to Tennyson's Idylls of the King. Although many versions exist, Malory's stands as the classic rendition. Malory wrote the book while in Newgate Prison during the last three years of his life; it was published some fourteen years later, in 1485, by William Caxton. The tales, steeped in the magic of Merlin, the powerful cords of the chivalric code, and the age-old dramas of love and death, resound across the centuries. The stories of King Arthur, Lancelot, Queen Guenever, and Tristram and Isolde seem astonishingly moving and modern. Malory's Le Morte d'Arthur endures and inspires because it embodies mankind's deepest yearnings for brotherhood and community, a love worth dying for, and valor, honor, and chivalry.

Aucune description trouvée dans une bibliothèque

Description du livre
Résumé sous forme de haïku

Couvertures populaires

Vos raccourcis

Évaluation

Moyenne: (3.86)
0.5 1
1 7
1.5 2
2 46
2.5 11
3 179
3.5 24
4 278
4.5 20
5 213

Est-ce vous ?

Devenez un(e) auteur LibraryThing.

 

À propos | Contact | LibraryThing.com | Respect de la vie privée et règles d'utilisation | Aide/FAQ | Blog | Boutique | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliothèques historiques | Critiques en avant-première | Partage des connaissances | 171,774,378 livres! | Barre supérieure: Toujours visible