AccueilGroupesDiscussionsExplorerTendances
Site de recherche
Ce site utilise des cookies pour fournir nos services, optimiser les performances, pour les analyses, et (si vous n'êtes pas connecté) pour les publicités. En utilisant Librarything, vous reconnaissez avoir lu et compris nos conditions générales d'utilisation et de services. Votre utilisation du site et de ses services vaut acceptation de ces conditions et termes.
Hide this

Résultats trouvés sur Google Books

Cliquer sur une vignette pour aller sur Google Books.

Serendipities: Language and Lunacy par…
Chargement...

Serendipities: Language and Lunacy (original 1999; édition 1999)

par Umberto Eco (Auteur)

MembresCritiquesPopularitéÉvaluation moyenneMentions
1,1541413,391 (3.61)14
Best-selling author Umberto Eco's latest work unlocks the riddles of history in an exploration of the "linguistics of the lunatic," stories told by scholars, scientists, poets, fanatics, and ordinary people in order to make sense of the world. Exploring the "Force of the False," Eco uncovers layers of mistakes that have shaped human history, such as Columbus's assumption that the world was much smaller than it is, leading him to seek out a quick route to the East via the West and thus fortuitously "discovering" America. The fictions that grew up around the cults of the Rosicrucians and Knights Templar were the result of a letter from a mysterious "Prester John"--undoubtedly a hoax--that provided fertile ground for a series of delusions and conspiracy theories based on religious, ethnic, and racial prejudices. While some false tales produce new knowledge (like Columbus's discovery of America) and others create nothing but horror and shame (the Rosicrucian story wound up fueling European anti-Semitism) they are all powerfully persuasive. In a careful unraveling of the fabulous and the false, Eco shows us how serendipities--unanticipated truths--often spring from mistaken ideas. From Leibniz's belief that the I Ching illustrated the principles of calculus to Marco Polo's mistaking a rhinoceros for a unicorn, Eco tours the labyrinth of intellectual history, illuminating the ways in which we project the familiar onto the strange. Eco uncovers a rich history of linguistic endeavor--much of it ill-conceived--that sought to "heal the wound of Babel." Through the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, Greek, Hebrew, Chinese, and Egyptian were alternately proclaimed as the first language that God gave to Adam, while--in keeping with the colonial climate of the time--the complex language of the Amerindians in Mexico was viewed as crude and diabolical. In closing, Eco considers the erroneous notion of linguistic perfection and shrewdly observes that the dangers we face lie not in the rules we use to interpret other cultures but in our insistence on making these rules absolute. With the startling combination of erudition and wit, bewildering anecdotes and scholarly rigor that are Eco's hallmarks, Serendipities is sure to entertain and enlighten any reader with a passion for the curious history of languages and ideas.… (plus d'informations)
Membre:Elizabeth.Huddleston
Titre:Serendipities: Language and Lunacy
Auteurs:Umberto Eco (Auteur)
Info:Harvest (1999), Edition: 1st, 144 pages
Collections:Votre bibliothèque
Évaluation:
Mots-clés:Aucun

Information sur l'oeuvre

Serendipities: Language and Lunacy par Umberto Eco (1999)

Chargement...

Inscrivez-vous à LibraryThing pour découvrir si vous aimerez ce livre

Actuellement, il n'y a pas de discussions au sujet de ce livre.

» Voir aussi les 14 mentions

Affichage de 1-5 de 14 (suivant | tout afficher)
Umberto Eco is best known for his book, "The Name of the Rose" which was made into a movie starring Sean Connery. He was, however, a literary critic and university professor. For this book, he has his philosopher's hat on.

It is a fascinating collection of five essays about language revised from lectures Eco gave in the 1990s. The lectures can be read separately, but they are related and make a good set. In them, Eco speculates on aspects of language, including the efforts over the ages to search for an original Hebrew, language of Adam; the evolution of language through misunderstandings, conquests and exchange; creation of a universal dictionary (much like the universal language of mathematics). Although there is much to absorb here, Eco's arguments are well laid out with broad cultural references, and beautifully written. ( )
  steller0707 | Aug 25, 2019 |
Somewhere in an earlier Alomodovar film, maybe Flower of the Secret, a character describes a scenario for a film, one which actually A would eventually create as Volver. I really like that, the inclusion. Eco anticipates his Cemetery of Prague with a devilish delight in this one, little surprise as nearly all of PC, outside of the protagonist, is grounded in historical evidence. I liked this dizzying book, though the final section did leave me grasping, if not gasping. ( )
  jonfaith | Feb 22, 2019 |
I'm an academic. Some of these are derived from his lectures? I strive to attain Eco's level of scholarship. ( )
  JasonRiedy | Jul 20, 2018 |
I greatly enjoyed the 'The Force of Falsity' with its many examples of how falsehoods end up have great consequences and historical impact. 'Languages in Paradise' was interesting but I admit to not knowing all of the references Eco made in the essay. I had never been aware of the inconsistency between the story of the Tower of Babel and Genesis 10. The search for the original sacred language is a fascinating concept in itself. ( )
  Humberto.Ferre | Sep 28, 2016 |
More language than lunacy, some of it almost too academicky, but Eco’s the kind of semiotician we’d like to drink with. Dante, Borges, Prester John, the cage of fundamentalism, god mumbling with an accent.

Jack’s Abby Calyptra Session IPL
Uinta Organic Hazel Amber Wheat
  MusicalGlass | Jul 9, 2016 |
Affichage de 1-5 de 14 (suivant | tout afficher)
aucune critique | ajouter une critique

» Ajouter d'autres auteur(e)s (1 possible)

Nom de l'auteur(e)RôleType d'auteurŒuvre ?Statut
Eco, Umbertoauteur(e) principal(e)toutes les éditionsconfirmé
Weaver, WilliamTraducteurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Vous devez vous identifier pour modifier le Partage des connaissances.
Pour plus d'aide, voir la page Aide sur le Partage des connaissances [en anglais].
Titre canonique
Titre original
Titres alternatifs
Date de première publication
Personnes ou personnages
Lieux importants
Évènements importants
Films connexes
Prix et distinctions
Épigraphe
Dédicace
Premiers mots
Citations
Derniers mots
Notice de désambigüisation
Directeur(-trice)(s) de publication
Courtes éloges de critiques
Langue d'origine
Informations provenant du Partage des connaissances anglais. Modifiez pour passer à votre langue.
DDC/MDS canonique
LCC canonique

Références à cette œuvre sur des ressources externes.

Wikipédia en anglais (3)

Best-selling author Umberto Eco's latest work unlocks the riddles of history in an exploration of the "linguistics of the lunatic," stories told by scholars, scientists, poets, fanatics, and ordinary people in order to make sense of the world. Exploring the "Force of the False," Eco uncovers layers of mistakes that have shaped human history, such as Columbus's assumption that the world was much smaller than it is, leading him to seek out a quick route to the East via the West and thus fortuitously "discovering" America. The fictions that grew up around the cults of the Rosicrucians and Knights Templar were the result of a letter from a mysterious "Prester John"--undoubtedly a hoax--that provided fertile ground for a series of delusions and conspiracy theories based on religious, ethnic, and racial prejudices. While some false tales produce new knowledge (like Columbus's discovery of America) and others create nothing but horror and shame (the Rosicrucian story wound up fueling European anti-Semitism) they are all powerfully persuasive. In a careful unraveling of the fabulous and the false, Eco shows us how serendipities--unanticipated truths--often spring from mistaken ideas. From Leibniz's belief that the I Ching illustrated the principles of calculus to Marco Polo's mistaking a rhinoceros for a unicorn, Eco tours the labyrinth of intellectual history, illuminating the ways in which we project the familiar onto the strange. Eco uncovers a rich history of linguistic endeavor--much of it ill-conceived--that sought to "heal the wound of Babel." Through the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, Greek, Hebrew, Chinese, and Egyptian were alternately proclaimed as the first language that God gave to Adam, while--in keeping with the colonial climate of the time--the complex language of the Amerindians in Mexico was viewed as crude and diabolical. In closing, Eco considers the erroneous notion of linguistic perfection and shrewdly observes that the dangers we face lie not in the rules we use to interpret other cultures but in our insistence on making these rules absolute. With the startling combination of erudition and wit, bewildering anecdotes and scholarly rigor that are Eco's hallmarks, Serendipities is sure to entertain and enlighten any reader with a passion for the curious history of languages and ideas.

Aucune description trouvée dans une bibliothèque

Description du livre
Résumé sous forme de haïku

Couvertures populaires

Vos raccourcis

Genres

Classification décimale de Melvil (CDD)

401 — Language Language Philosophy and theory

Classification de la Bibliothèque du Congrès

Évaluation

Moyenne: (3.61)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 5
2.5 3
3 35
3.5 9
4 36
4.5 2
5 15

Est-ce vous ?

Devenez un(e) auteur LibraryThing.

 

À propos | Contact | LibraryThing.com | Respect de la vie privée et règles d'utilisation | Aide/FAQ | Blog | Boutique | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliothèques historiques | Critiques en avant-première | Partage des connaissances | 166,240,050 livres! | Barre supérieure: Toujours visible