AccueilGroupesDiscussionsPlusTendances
Site de recherche
Ce site utilise des cookies pour fournir nos services, optimiser les performances, pour les analyses, et (si vous n'êtes pas connecté) pour les publicités. En utilisant Librarything, vous reconnaissez avoir lu et compris nos conditions générales d'utilisation et de services. Votre utilisation du site et de ses services vaut acceptation de ces conditions et termes.
Hide this

Résultats trouvés sur Google Books

Cliquer sur une vignette pour aller sur Google Books.

Chargement...

The Remaking

par Clay Chapman

MembresCritiquesPopularitéÉvaluation moyenneMentions
1335162,651 (3.45)4
Inspired by a true story, this supernatural thriller for fans of horror and true crime follows a tale as it evolves every twenty years--with terrifying results. Ella Louise has lived in the woods surrounding Pilot's Creek, Virginia, for nearly a decade. Publicly, she and her daughter Jessica are shunned by their upper-crust family and the Pilot's Creek residents. Privately, desperate townspeople visit her apothecary for a cure to what ails them--until Ella Louise is blamed for the death of a prominent customer. Accused of witchcraft, both mother and daughter are burned at the stake in the middle of the night. Ella Louise's burial site is never found, but the little girl has the most famous grave in the South: a steel-reinforced coffin surrounded by a fence of interconnected white crosses. Their story will take the shape of an urban legend as it's told around a campfire by a man forever marked by his boyhood encounters with Jessica. Decades later, a boy at that campfire will cast Amber Pendleton as Jessica in a '70s horror movie inspired by the Witch Girl of Pilot's Creek. Amber's experiences on that set and its meta-remake in the '90s will ripple through pop culture, ruining her life and career after she becomes the target of a witch hunt. Amber's best chance to break the cycle of horror comes when a true-crime investigator tracks her down to interview her for his popular podcast. But will this final act of storytelling redeem her--or will it bring the story full circle, ready to be told once again? And again. And again . . .… (plus d'informations)
Chargement...

Inscrivez-vous à LibraryThing pour découvrir si vous aimerez ce livre

Actuellement, il n'y a pas de discussions au sujet de ce livre.

» Voir aussi les 4 mentions

5 sur 5
Not a five-star read, but I really did enjoy this one.

I know a lot of other readers didn't like the pacing, or the multi-decade jumps, but honestly, I really enjoyed that aspect of this story. For me, it allowed for different characters, therefore different points of view, on the central theme, which was enjoyable. We also got to see Amber at three different stages of her life, and how this had affected her entire life. And that, to me, is powerful.

I have two complaints. One minor, one a little more problematic.

The first is just more of a stylistic complaint. It didn't really matter who was narrating, but the author has a habit of really digging into repetition to drive a point home.

I'm taking you home.

I'm taking you home.

Taking you home.

Home.

Home.


Used sparingly, this can really underscore a point, but the author makes use of it far too much and it simply dilutes the point.

The second, and more problematic point is something I'm finding with a few of the horror novels I've read lately (I'm looking at you, [b:Ghoster|31934011|Ghoster|Jason Arnopp|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1565086425l/31934011._SX50_.jpg|72948659], and giving you the stinky side-eye, [b:The Cabin at the End of the World|36381091|The Cabin at the End of the World|Paul Tremblay|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1575855422l/36381091._SY75_.jpg|57969097])...you have a great concept, and you may even pull it off for the majority of the story, but then it's like the author doesn't know how to end it.

I feel like Chapman knew what he wanted here, and he came close, but it felt rushed and vague. That's all I can say without spoiling it. I'll just say it sort of works, if you squint your eyes and cant your head at just the right angle, but it's not quite there.

Still, overall, I'd recommend this one. Don't come in expecting major jumps and terror. This is a much slower, creeping horror. It's quiet and it sneaks up on you. ( )
  TobinElliott | Sep 3, 2021 |
I really enjoyed parts I & II of this book, was mostly just irritated during part III, and just ready to be done by part IV...

I was super intrigued by the premise of this book and the pacing of the first two sections felt really good and I was absolutely rooting for Amber, the child actor. Adult Amber, however, made me roll my eyes completely and the writing became overwrought & incredibly repetitive. If the author's goal was to make me despise the main character, he succeeded. Mostly, I was just hoping that the ghosts would finally show up and put her (& me) out of our misery. The final section was better, but still very repetitive and, strangely, rushed.

The audiobook was good, the narrators were overall excellent. I hope others get better mileage from this one than I did. ( )
1 voter tattooedreader13 | Aug 27, 2020 |
The Remaking by Clay McLeod Chapman is a horror story I was prepared to enjoy but, unfortunately, I found it to be stagnant and boring. This is the story of Ella Louise Ford and her daughter Jessica who were burned at the stake under suspicion of being witches. This crime was committed by some of the townspeople of Pilot’s Creek in Virginia who subsequently met their end in grim fashion. Twenty years later, an ambitious director comes to town to make a movie about the unfortunate mother and child. Things do not go well and twenty years after that, a remaking of the movie is undertaken. I read the entire book because many reviewers found this novel to be excellent and I wanted to be fair by making sure that I was not missing anything. Unfortunately, it only seemed to repeat itself, at a slow pace, over and over again. Maybe this is not my kind of book and please remember that this is only my own opinion. Thank you to Quirk Books and NetGalley for the e-ARC in exchange for an honest review. ( )
  carole888fort | Jan 6, 2020 |
Pilot’s Creek, Virginia is known for one thing, the legend of Ella Louise and Jessica, the mother and daughter who were accused of being witches in 1931. After the townsmen burned them at the stake, Ella Louise’s remains were abandoned in the woods. But little Jessica’s were buried in the cemetery under layers of cement. Her grave is surrounded by interlocking crosses, just to make sure.

In the 1970’s a man named Lee Ketchum decided to make a movie about the legend of the mother and daughter witches. Having grown up with the legend, he had been obsessed since he was a boy to make a movie of their story. Amber Pendelton is cast in his movie as little Jessica. Her life is forever changed by what she experienced in the woods during the filming of the movie.

This is a classic ghost story. It is also about cult horror films and how they don’t seem to die. I felt the book dragged out a bit too much, though, and parts were slow-moving. ( )
  Sandralovesbooks | Nov 29, 2019 |
'The Remaking' is a self-aware horror novel about an urban legend with supernatural inertia. The story of how Ella Louise and her daughter Jessica were labeled witches and burned in a small southern town in the 1920s is told again and again, a cult movie, a 90s remake, eventually a podcast comes knocking....

The story is inviting enough, but the air went out of the novel when I realized a hundred pages in that the back-cover copy was the entire novel. The novel isn't about the vindication of Amber and/or a quest to get to the heart of the curse of Jessica, the little witch girl. You follow each stage and it doesn't matter, because you know what's going to happen. I know old 40s movie trailers used to show the whole film in 30 seconds, and audiences were fine with that, but I thought we were past all that. This isn't like 'Moby-Dick' or something, where we all know the ending but the brick of a novel is still worth reading. I feel like in the last five years or so there is no effort made in making trailers that invite you in. They just say it all. Which is disappointing, because this isn't Moby-Dick, or even a decent horror film.

This knowing exactly where the story was going as I plodded through it was a little frustrating and took a lot of the appreciation out of the occasionally well-crafted atmosphere generated by the book. Even if I didn't know where the story was going, I don't know if the novel would have held up, as each section had trouble standing on its own. We didn't spend enough time with anybody but the understandably anxious and, later, damaged Amber for any real horror to creep in.

I read it through to the end to see if the author would pull a last-minute victory of an ending, but it was some vague, pseudo-feminist babble. I don't think an author can have characters rattling around and doing nothing for hundreds of pages and then pretend at the end it was all part of some sort of grand scheme. It's too bad, I loved the horror film references and would have liked some contemporary commentary on the genre. ( )
  ManWithAnAgenda | Sep 28, 2019 |
5 sur 5
aucune critique | ajouter une critique
Vous devez vous identifier pour modifier le Partage des connaissances.
Pour plus d'aide, voir la page Aide sur le Partage des connaissances [en anglais].
Titre canonique
Informations provenant du Partage des connaissances anglais. Modifiez pour passer à votre langue.
Titre original
Titres alternatifs
Date de première publication
Personnes ou personnages
Lieux importants
Évènements importants
Films connexes
Prix et distinctions
Épigraphe
Dédicace
Premiers mots
Citations
Derniers mots
Notice de désambigüisation
Directeur(-trice)(s) de publication
Courtes éloges de critiques
Langue d'origine
DDC/MDS canonique
LCC canonique

Références à cette œuvre sur des ressources externes.

Wikipédia en anglais

Aucun

Inspired by a true story, this supernatural thriller for fans of horror and true crime follows a tale as it evolves every twenty years--with terrifying results. Ella Louise has lived in the woods surrounding Pilot's Creek, Virginia, for nearly a decade. Publicly, she and her daughter Jessica are shunned by their upper-crust family and the Pilot's Creek residents. Privately, desperate townspeople visit her apothecary for a cure to what ails them--until Ella Louise is blamed for the death of a prominent customer. Accused of witchcraft, both mother and daughter are burned at the stake in the middle of the night. Ella Louise's burial site is never found, but the little girl has the most famous grave in the South: a steel-reinforced coffin surrounded by a fence of interconnected white crosses. Their story will take the shape of an urban legend as it's told around a campfire by a man forever marked by his boyhood encounters with Jessica. Decades later, a boy at that campfire will cast Amber Pendleton as Jessica in a '70s horror movie inspired by the Witch Girl of Pilot's Creek. Amber's experiences on that set and its meta-remake in the '90s will ripple through pop culture, ruining her life and career after she becomes the target of a witch hunt. Amber's best chance to break the cycle of horror comes when a true-crime investigator tracks her down to interview her for his popular podcast. But will this final act of storytelling redeem her--or will it bring the story full circle, ready to be told once again? And again. And again . . .

Aucune description trouvée dans une bibliothèque

Description du livre
Résumé sous forme de haïku

Couvertures populaires

Vos raccourcis

Genres

Classification décimale de Melvil (CDD)

813.6 — Literature American and Canadian American fiction 21st Century

Classification de la Bibliothèque du Congrès

Évaluation

Moyenne: (3.45)
0.5
1
1.5 1
2
2.5
3 8
3.5 2
4 8
4.5 1
5

Est-ce vous ?

Devenez un(e) auteur LibraryThing.

 

À propos | Contact | LibraryThing.com | Respect de la vie privée et règles d'utilisation | Aide/FAQ | Blog | Boutique | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliothèques historiques | Critiques en avant-première | Partage des connaissances | 162,479,551 livres! | Barre supérieure: Toujours visible