AccueilGroupesDiscussionsExplorerTendances
Site de recherche
Ce site utilise des cookies pour fournir nos services, optimiser les performances, pour les analyses, et (si vous n'êtes pas connecté) pour les publicités. En utilisant Librarything, vous reconnaissez avoir lu et compris nos conditions générales d'utilisation et de services. Votre utilisation du site et de ses services vaut acceptation de ces conditions et termes.
Hide this

Résultats trouvés sur Google Books

Cliquer sur une vignette pour aller sur Google Books.

Cinderella Liberator (Fairy Tale Revolution)…
Chargement...

Cinderella Liberator (Fairy Tale Revolution) (édition 2019)

par Rebecca Solnit (Auteur), Arthur Rackham (Illustrateur)

MembresCritiquesPopularitéÉvaluation moyenneMentions
14010163,801 (4.17)8
Rebecca Solnit retells 'Cinderella'. A Fairy Tale Revolution is here to remix and revive our favourite stories. 'She looked like a girl who was evening, and an evening that had become a girl...' In the kitchen, in her rags, Cinderella, longs to go to the ball. After all, there is nothing worse than not being invited to the party. Enter her fairy godmother... But that is where the familiar story ends. Cinderella's transformation turns out to be much less about ballgowns, glass slippers and carriages, and much more about finding her truest self. Finally free from the kitchen cinders, who will she turn out to be?… (plus d'informations)
Membre:Zboy
Titre:Cinderella Liberator (Fairy Tale Revolution)
Auteurs:Rebecca Solnit (Auteur)
Autres auteurs:Arthur Rackham (Illustrateur)
Info:Haymarket Books (2019), Edition: Later Printing, 32 pages
Collections:Funroom bookshelf Export
Évaluation:
Mots-clés:Aucun

Information sur l'oeuvre

Cinderella Liberator par Rebecca Solnit

Aucun
Chargement...

Inscrivez-vous à LibraryThing pour découvrir si vous aimerez ce livre

Actuellement, il n'y a pas de discussions au sujet de ce livre.

» Voir aussi les 8 mentions

Affichage de 1-5 de 10 (suivant | tout afficher)
I appreciated this retelling in that it didn't really change the story as much as modernize it and give the characters more agency to find what they want to do with their lives. Solnit's short afterward/explanation at the end of the book was very informative. I also loved her choice to bring Rackham's watercolor silhouettes to a modern book. ( )
  Bodagirl | May 23, 2022 |
In which I am deeply amused -- just the right touches for me, in this modern retelling --they pronoun townsfolk and the rat coachwoman and the mice deciding whether they will stay horses, and all the spoiled and wealthy folk embracing an active lifestyle and satisfying work. Most of all, I like the theme of abundance -- that there is enough for everyone if it is shared properly, and agency -- that things can change if you ask for help or make decisions for yourself. There will be people who dislike this book, but I am not one of them. ( )
  jennybeast | Apr 14, 2022 |
What a beautiful book!

Recently I talked with a friend about looking for fairy tales with messages that you don't mind teaching your children. While we could come up with a few, we also came across suggestions to change old tales. The suggestions, while surely meant well, were mostly short sighted, like just making all male characters female.

This story on the other hand does it in a amazing way. It is so well retold, seemingly effortless inclusive, with beautiful messages. I hope there is a German translation. ( )
  Sue_Z | Mar 22, 2022 |
"With a little help from her fairy godmother, Cinderella takes care of business while learning how to be her “best and freest” self.

With the avowed intention of creating a “kinder” vision of the familiar tale that also gets away from the invidious notion that marrying (preferably marrying up) is the main chance in life for women, Solnit (Call Them by Their True Names, 2018, Kirkus Prize winner in nonfiction) offers younger readers this revisionist Cinderella. She arrives at the ball attended by transformed “footwomen,” befriends Prince Nevermind (who really just wants to be a farmer), and, while her stepsisters take up careers in fashion, goes on to open a cake shop where she harbors refugee children. The author’s efforts to get away from sexist tropes and language aren’t entirely successful (one stepsister becomes a “seamstress,” for instance), and an analytical afterword in cramped type that rivals the tale itself for length further weighs down the wordy, lecture-laden narrative. Still, readers ready to question the assumptions innate in most variants, European ones in particular, will find this one refreshing. The carefully selected Rackham silhouettes, first published a century ago, invest “Ella” with proactive spirit while (as the author notes) sidestepping racial determinations (in skin color at least, if not hair texture).

A story with a serious claim to universality again proves that it can bear a carriage full of messages. (lengthy source note) (Folktale. 8-10)" From Kirkus Reviews, www.kirkusreviews.com
  CDJLibrary | Feb 25, 2021 |
High points:
-The presence of people of different genders in various roles was so simply done. Why NOT have a lady sea captain? Coachwoman? Apple farmer?
-I love that the fairy godmother asks the creatures whether they want to go back to their old lives or stay in their new forms, and doesn't impose anyone else's will upon them. Each one gets a choice to consent or not.
-Ella's "happy ending", and the progression/redemption of the prince and the stepsisters, were lovely. They all get to do what makes them happiest.

I wish the children from warring kingdoms part had been slightly more subtle - something that had come up earlier and reached a natural resolution, maybe, instead of a random insertion at the end. I completely and totally support the message behind it, it just didn't feel like it was part of this story.

The writing was a little too repetitive for me in the beginning -- I know it's a fairy tale retelling, and so comes with the territory, but it felt like a little too much.

This would be fun for storytime, though I think it would require some prior knowledge of the Cinderella story -- I feel like children would miss out on some of the nods and lessons if they don't know what's been changed. ( )
  Midhiel | Mar 18, 2020 |
Affichage de 1-5 de 10 (suivant | tout afficher)
aucune critique | ajouter une critique

» Ajouter d'autres auteur(e)s

Nom de l'auteur(e)RôleType d'auteurŒuvre ?Statut
Rebecca Solnitauteur(e) principal(e)toutes les éditionscalculé
Rackham, ArthurIllustrateurauteur principalquelques éditionsconfirmé
Cohen, RachelConcepteurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Weintraub, AbbyBook and cover designauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé

Appartient à la série

Est une ré-écriture de

Vous devez vous identifier pour modifier le Partage des connaissances.
Pour plus d'aide, voir la page Aide sur le Partage des connaissances [en anglais].
Titre canonique
Titre original
Titres alternatifs
Date de première publication
Personnes ou personnages
Informations provenant du Partage des connaissances anglais. Modifiez pour passer à votre langue.
Lieux importants
Évènements importants
Films connexes
Prix et distinctions
Informations provenant du Partage des connaissances anglais. Modifiez pour passer à votre langue.
Épigraphe
Dédicace
Premiers mots
Informations provenant du Partage des connaissances anglais. Modifiez pour passer à votre langue.
Once upon a time there was a girl named Cinderella.
Citations
Derniers mots
Informations provenant du Partage des connaissances anglais. Modifiez pour passer à votre langue.
(Cliquez pour voir. Attention : peut vendre la mèche.)
Notice de désambigüisation
Directeur(-trice)(s) de publication
Courtes éloges de critiques
Informations provenant du Partage des connaissances anglais. Modifiez pour passer à votre langue.
Langue d'origine
DDC/MDS canonique
LCC canonique

Références à cette œuvre sur des ressources externes.

Wikipédia en anglais

Aucun

Rebecca Solnit retells 'Cinderella'. A Fairy Tale Revolution is here to remix and revive our favourite stories. 'She looked like a girl who was evening, and an evening that had become a girl...' In the kitchen, in her rags, Cinderella, longs to go to the ball. After all, there is nothing worse than not being invited to the party. Enter her fairy godmother... But that is where the familiar story ends. Cinderella's transformation turns out to be much less about ballgowns, glass slippers and carriages, and much more about finding her truest self. Finally free from the kitchen cinders, who will she turn out to be?

Aucune description trouvée dans une bibliothèque

Description du livre
Résumé sous forme de haïku

Couvertures populaires

Vos raccourcis

Évaluation

Moyenne: (4.17)
0.5
1
1.5 1
2
2.5
3 4
3.5
4 18
4.5 1
5 12

Est-ce vous ?

Devenez un(e) auteur LibraryThing.

 

À propos | Contact | LibraryThing.com | Respect de la vie privée et règles d'utilisation | Aide/FAQ | Blog | Boutique | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliothèques historiques | Critiques en avant-première | Partage des connaissances | 171,980,611 livres! | Barre supérieure: Toujours visible