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Wordslut: A Feminist Guide to Taking Back…
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Wordslut: A Feminist Guide to Taking Back the English Language (édition 2020)

par Amanda Montell (Auteur)

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3911565,281 (4.21)22
A brash, enlightening, and wildly entertaining feminist look at gendered language and the way it shapes us, written with humor and playfulness that challenges words and phrases and how we use them. The word bitch conjures many images for many people, but is most often meant to describe an unpleasant woman. Even before its usage to mean a female canine, bitch didn't refer to gender at all-it originated as a gender-neutral word meaning genitalia. A perfectly innocuous word devolving into a female insult is the case for tons more terms, including hussy-which simply meant "housewife"-or slut, which meant "untidy" and was also used to describe men. These words are just a few among history's many English slurs hurled at women. Amanda Montell, feminist linguist and staff features editor at online beauty and health magazine Byrdie.com, deconstructs language-from insults and cursing to grammar and pronunciation patterns-to reveal the ways it has been used for centuries to keep women form gaining equality. Ever wonder why so many people are annoyed when women use the word "like" as a filler? Or why certain gender neutral terms stick and others don't? Or even how linguists have historically discussed women's speech patterns? Wordslut is no stuffy academic study; Montell's irresistible humor shines through, making linguistics not only approachable but both downright hilarious and profound, demonstrated in chapters such as: Slutty Skanks and Nasty Dykes: A Comprehensive List of Gendered Insults Piss Off Bro: Linguists Explain What Locker Room Banter Really Is How to Embarrass the Shit Out of People Who Try to Correct Your Grammar Fuck it: An Ode to Cursing While Female Cyclops, Panty Puppet, Bald Headed Bastard and 100+ Other Things to Call Your Genitalia Montell effortlessly moves between history and popular culture to explore these questions and more. Wordslut gets to the heart of our language, marvels at its elasticity, and sheds much-needed light into the biases that shadow women in our culture and our consciousness.… (plus d'informations)
Membre:ashdinh
Titre:Wordslut: A Feminist Guide to Taking Back the English Language
Auteurs:Amanda Montell (Auteur)
Info:Harper Paperbacks (2020), Edition: Reprint, 304 pages
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Wordslut: A Feminist Guide to Taking Back the English Language par Amanda Montell (Author)

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Any college or university writing or English course needs to include "Wordslut: A Feminist Guide to Taking Back the English Language" as one of the required texts. It makes one think about the motivations behind people's peculiar linguistic habits, like the use of fillers or hedging.

An in-depth analysis of how words associated with femininity frequently evolve into derogatory terms, while words associated with masculinity use power and authority connotations is given in this insightful piece that explores the evolution of gendered language throughout centuries of human social circles.

The book also examines how gendered language affects the LGBTQIA+ community and looks at how slang and the internet interact to influence linguistic norms.

With a delightfully snarky tone, the book delivers an engaging reading experience that is both enlightening and enjoyable.
  deathicey | Dec 25, 2023 |
I am interested in both gender issues and linguistic geekiness, so this was my kind of book. Thought-provoking, educational and entertaining - and infuriating at times (meaning me do eye rolls at the patriarchy). Highly recommended. ( )
  Alexandra_book_life | Dec 15, 2023 |
Wordslut by Amanda Montell is a captivating exploration of the intricate relationship between language and societal attitudes towards women. It’s always nice to stumble across an unexpected gem, and finding this book is one such occasion. The cover's striking colour and standout title may have reeled me in, but it was the intriguing subject matter and Montell's accessible writing style which kept me reading.

Far from the radical feminist manifesto I had feared, Wordslut is witty, engaging, and well-researched. Montell displays a particular talent for making complex linguistic concepts comprehensible to a broader audience, challenging readers to contemplate their language use and question societal norms. Montell prompts readers to rethink language not merely as a reflection but as a potent influencer of societal dynamics and attitudes towards women. This book is not a comprehensive treatise on sociolinguistics, but it’s not meant to be. It is an introduction of the topic to the masses, and, in this, it certainly serves its purpose.

Montell delves into some polarising topics, with her take on political correctness, in particular, likely provoking strong reactions, especially among conservatives. Political correctness, she tells us, ‘…does not endanger our freedom of expression at all. The only thing it actually threatens is the notion that we can separate our word choices from our politics – that how we choose to communicate doesn’t say something deeper about who we are…What rubs people the wrong way about political correctness is not that they can’t use certain words anymore, it’s that political neutrality is no longer an option.’ Nevertheless, publishing a book on such topics as those discussed in Wordslut inevitably involves stepping on someone's toes; it's impossible to avoid offense.

A helpful addition to future additions would be the inclusion of a glossary and reference list. Needing to flick back through the book when I forgot an acronym, or qualification was an annoyance, and I often seek out further reading on the topics that interest me. While in-text references are included, an easily accessible list at the back would have been more convenient.

Minor inconveniences aside, Wordslut skilfully navigates the intricate role language plays in shaping our attitudes, beliefs, and behaviours, introducing sociolinguistics to the layperson, and encouraging readers to question social norms and the role of their own linguistic choices in shaping who they are. Whether or not you agree with Montell’s arguments, I encourage you to read what she has to say. ( )
  DelDevours | Dec 12, 2023 |
This books is fun, saucy and definitely interesting. Using a sociolinguistic approach, she looks at how women are discriminated against with their use of language (by using hedges, questions, girl talk), how they are more often interrupted, how words used most often assume a male perspective (eg. using "hey guys" as a gender-neutral term). Montell also looks at the binary of grammar which, by default, excludes certain genders and she reviews pronunciations (vocal fry, "gay voice"). She also devotes a chapter to dialects and codes which oppressed people will adopt to create languages that are reflective of their realities. And those are just some of the topics in this rich book.
It's a super accessible read, it's humorous, and it includes a lot of examples not only from feminist works, but also from 2SLGBTQ+ and, to a smaller extent, racialized communities.

I've just finished the book and already I'm seeing the assumptions that we make. Upon reading an article this morning on the Plant Mom Aesthetic, I couldn't help notice that the default was female - as though to be nurturing and caring was intrinsically a woman's quality. I guess you have to be a forest ranger to be a male lover of plants . It shows just how the language we use reflects socially accepted points of view. This book will help challenge the words that we use and cast a different perspective on how we all communicate. ( )
  Cecilturtle | Oct 3, 2023 |
A brilliant and so necessary look at how the English language, implicitly or otherwise, under-values, insults, judges or ignores women. A times, it will make you angry; it will also make you laugh. Especially interesting, to me, was how marginalized groups use slang for safety and to build community. The author explores gendered insults, the language of sex and gender, how women talk when men aren't around, and swearing.

A great read. ( )
  LynnB | Jun 26, 2023 |
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Montell, AmandaAuteurauteur principaltoutes les éditionsconfirmé
Bouvard, LaurenceNarrateurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Montell, AmandaNarrateurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
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When I sat the word bitch, what comes to mind?
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In the wrong hands, speech can be used as a weapon. But in the right ones, it can change the world.
…human beings use language as a social tool to do things like create solidarity, form relationships, and assert authority.
We're living in an era when many of us often feel overwhelmed and silenced by the English language.
Perhaps you've heard this feminist riddle: “A young boy was rushed to the hospital from the scene of an accident, where his father was killed, and prepped for emergency surgery. The surgeon walked in, took one look, and said, ‘I can't operate on him – he's my son.' How is this possible?” This scenario trips people up because if the boy's father is dead, how could he be operating on him? Few come to the conclusion that surgeon was in fact his mother. The rare and exotic lady surgeon.
Back in Chaucer's day, the word girl meant a child of any sex. In Old English, pretty meant crafty or cunning. In Middle English, dinner literally mean breakfast.
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A brash, enlightening, and wildly entertaining feminist look at gendered language and the way it shapes us, written with humor and playfulness that challenges words and phrases and how we use them. The word bitch conjures many images for many people, but is most often meant to describe an unpleasant woman. Even before its usage to mean a female canine, bitch didn't refer to gender at all-it originated as a gender-neutral word meaning genitalia. A perfectly innocuous word devolving into a female insult is the case for tons more terms, including hussy-which simply meant "housewife"-or slut, which meant "untidy" and was also used to describe men. These words are just a few among history's many English slurs hurled at women. Amanda Montell, feminist linguist and staff features editor at online beauty and health magazine Byrdie.com, deconstructs language-from insults and cursing to grammar and pronunciation patterns-to reveal the ways it has been used for centuries to keep women form gaining equality. Ever wonder why so many people are annoyed when women use the word "like" as a filler? Or why certain gender neutral terms stick and others don't? Or even how linguists have historically discussed women's speech patterns? Wordslut is no stuffy academic study; Montell's irresistible humor shines through, making linguistics not only approachable but both downright hilarious and profound, demonstrated in chapters such as: Slutty Skanks and Nasty Dykes: A Comprehensive List of Gendered Insults Piss Off Bro: Linguists Explain What Locker Room Banter Really Is How to Embarrass the Shit Out of People Who Try to Correct Your Grammar Fuck it: An Ode to Cursing While Female Cyclops, Panty Puppet, Bald Headed Bastard and 100+ Other Things to Call Your Genitalia Montell effortlessly moves between history and popular culture to explore these questions and more. Wordslut gets to the heart of our language, marvels at its elasticity, and sheds much-needed light into the biases that shadow women in our culture and our consciousness.

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