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A Woman Is No Man: A Novel par Etaf Rum
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A Woman Is No Man: A Novel (édition 2020)

par Etaf Rum (Auteur)

MembresCritiquesPopularitéÉvaluation moyenneMentions
8924718,573 (4.05)43
A NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER A READ WITH JENNA TODAY SHOW BOOK CLUB PICK  A GOODREADS CHOICE AWARDS FINALIST FOR BEST FICTION AND BEST DEBUT * BOOKBROWE'S BEST BOOK OF THE YEAR * A MARIE CLAIRE BEST WOMEN'S FICTION OF THE YEAR * A REAL SIMPLE BEST BOOK OF THE YEAR * A POPSUGAR BEST BOOK OF THE YEAR ALL WRITTEN BY FEMALES A New York Times Book Review Editors' Choice * A Washington Post 10 Books to Read in March * A Newsweek Best Book of the Summer * A USA Today Best Book of the Week * A Washington Book Review Difficult-To-Put-Down Novel * A Refinery 29 Best Books of the Month * A Buzzfeed News 4 Books We Couldn't Put Down Last Month * A New Arab Best Books by Arab Authors * An Electric Lit 20 Best Debuts of the First Half of 2019 * A The Millions Most Anticipated Books of 2019 "Garnering justified comparisons to Khaled Hosseini's A Thousand Splendid Suns... Etaf Rum's debut novel is a must-read about women mustering up the bravery to follow their inner voice."   --Refinery 29 In her debut novel Etaf Rum tells the story of three generations of Palestinian-American women struggling to express their individual desires within the confines of their Arab culture in the wake of shocking intimate violence in their community--a story of culture and honor, secrets and betrayals, love and violence. Set in an America at once foreign to many and staggeringly close at hand, A Woman Is No Man is an intimate glimpse into a controlling and closed cultural world, and a universal tale about family and the ways silence and shame can destroy those we have sworn to protect. "Where I come from, we've learned to silence ourselves. We've been taught that silence will save us. Where I come from, we keep these stories to ourselves. To tell them to the outside world is unheard of--dangerous, the ultimate shame." Palestine, 1990. Seventeen-year-old Isra prefers reading books to entertaining the suitors her father has chosen for her. Over the course of a week, the naïve and dreamy girl finds herself quickly betrothed and married, and is soon living in Brooklyn. There Isra struggles to adapt to the expectations of her oppressive mother-in-law Fareeda and strange new husband Adam, a pressure that intensifies as she begins to have children--four daughters instead of the sons Fareeda tells Isra she must bear. Brooklyn, 2008. Eighteen-year-old Deya, Isra's oldest daughter, must meet with potential husbands at her grandmother Fareeda's insistence, though her only desire is to go to college. Deya can't help but wonder if her options would have been different had her parents survived the car crash that killed them when Deya was only eight. But her grandmother is firm on the matter: the only way to secure a worthy future for Deya is through marriage to the right man. But fate has a will of its own, and soon Deya will find herself on an unexpected path that leads her to shocking truths about her family--knowledge that will force her to question everything she thought she knew about her parents, the past, and her own future.… (plus d'informations)
Membre:eshaundo
Titre:A Woman Is No Man: A Novel
Auteurs:Etaf Rum (Auteur)
Info:Harper Perennial (2020), Edition: Reprint, 368 pages
Collections:Votre bibliothèque
Évaluation:***
Mots-clés:l-unrecs

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A Woman Is No Man par Etaf Rum

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    Dominicana par Angie Cruz (MM_Jones)
    MM_Jones: Both are immigrant to New York stories from a different culture.
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» Voir aussi les 43 mentions

Affichage de 1-5 de 47 (suivant | tout afficher)
I honestly couldn't get enough of this book once I got into it. There were multiple instances where I had to put the book down and take a deep breath because some scenes completely shocked and amazed me. It was an absolute page turner. I had to know what was going to happen next and I had to figure out how everything was related. I should mention a *trigger warning* because there was a lot of scenes with abuse of varying kinds that were honestly pretty upsetting. But I think the author handled it well, especially given the context of the book in general. I highly recommend this book to anyone looking for a emotional book with twists and turns that also gives light to a new perspective. ( )
  kathrynwithak7 | Nov 24, 2021 |
audiobook fiction - told through the shifting viewpoints of three generations of Muslim American women, Fareeda (toxic mother-in-law and Palestinian emigrant), Isra (young mother who has also left her family in Palestine after marrying Fareeda's eldest son), and Deya (Isra's eldest of 4 daughters, raised by Fareeda after her parents' deaths, now of marriageable age but wanting to go to college instead). 1970s-80s Palestine and refugee camps / 1990s-2000s Brooklyn NYC.

Liked the story (for once I did not get tired of the switching storylines -- each was engaging and suspenseful), and the hopeful ending (especially in light of the author's backstory, though the book is not based on her own life), but I really hope no one makes generalizations about Islam based on these characters. There is oppression in some cultures that affects many women, but the Islamic experience is as diverse as the billions of Muslims who live in different places all over the world, and it would be a gross mistake to assume that to be a Muslim woman is as necessarily as horrible and tragic as these characters' lives might lead one to believe.

Please read also :

The Bad Muslim Discount

Books by Uzma Jalaluddin

I would also recommend the young adult fiction books by S. K. Ali ( )
  reader1009 | Oct 3, 2021 |
A Woman Is No Man is an intense novel examining the ways in which some women in certain patriarchal cultures suffer at the hands of both men and other women when it comes to leading their own lives versus going along with a status quo where reputation and bearing baby boys is everything.

The story focuses on three women - Isra, who moves from Palestine to the US with her new husband, their eldest daughter Deya, and Fareeda, Isra's mother-in-law. We quickly learn that Isra and Deya - along with Isra's sister-in-law Sarah - are expected to comply with their elders' every command, including getting married at a young age and forgoing any sort of higher education in favour of popping out babies. While the family are Muslims, these expectations come from the culture in which the family lives, rather than their religion (a distinction that is often left out of some modern-day discourse around the lives of women in patriarchal cultures).

The writing is rich in description - I particularly liked the descriptions of Isra's home in Palestine at the start of the novel. The author uses a very close third-person perspective to show the interiority of each character, but as events take bleaker and bleaker turns, this can soon feel a little claustrophobic for the reader. I had to keep putting the book down to give myself a break from the misery of the characters, a privilege that I know full well the women who go through this kind of suffering can't access.

Still, I really liked learning about Palestinian culture and food (which sounds fantastic!), and seeing what life for some Palestinians has been like since the nakba. I hope we continue to see more novels from Palestinian authors break through in the west. ( )
  mooingzelda | Jul 11, 2021 |
Nominated in two categories for best book in 2019 by Goodreads, there are many positive reviews of this book. There is no question that the subservient role of Palestinian women and the abuse to which they are subjected is heart-wrenching and that Rum deserves credit for shedding light on some darkness in this world. But, this book reminded me of Groundhog Day, with the same set of events occurring again and again, especially the cultural shame of giving birth to a girl versus a boy or the desire of women to become educated versus married at age 16, 17 or 18, often to a stranger or even to speak her mind. ( )
  skipstern | Jul 11, 2021 |
In 1990, teenage Isra leaves her home in Palestine to be married to Adam, who she has barely met. She moves to Brooklyn, where she is stifled by her overbearing mother in law, Fareeda, and proceeds to disappoint her by bearing daughters.

In 2008, Isra's oldest daughter Deya is being pushed by her grandmother to follow in her mother's footsteps.

This as intense, heartbreaking book. It flips through time, and between all three characters, to let the story unfold. All three women are suffocated by the weight of cultural expectation. (Rum makes clear that these expectations are not Islamic; at worst, she might be accused of an unflattering portrayal of Palestinian-American immigrants, but I don't think such an accusation would bear weight under examination.) The women, and the men they live with, are weighed down by history, dislodged by war and emigration. Without a secure sense of place in America, they cling to a set of cultural rules to separate themselves.

What that amounts to is a stifling, violent, patriarchal life, in which reputation is everything, and the value of a woman is nothing. Women are a burden; sons will bring you security. Even a trip alone to the supermarket would be a breach of protocol. Much of the novel has Fareeda and Isra, or Fareeda and Deya, trapped in the house together. Reading novels is Isra and Deya's act of rebellion, time spent away from the endless work of cooking and serving the men. Adam's sister Sarah, and Isra's sister in law Nadine, push back at what is expected of them, but Isra, trapped between her memories of her mother's own mistreatment and her perceived failure as a wife, becomes beaten down.

The women form the complex, emotional heart of the story, and Rum is interested in how they respond to how they are trapped in their cultural bonds and how they choose to respond with the small amount of agency they have. The men are peripheral. Their control exists in part because women uphold it. While there are hints of their own dilemmas, Rum isn't nearly as interested in them. She has a wonderful sense of detail in their thoughts and experiences--the characters live in an almost claustrophobically contained world, where they rarely leave the confines of their block, but the minutiae, from rolling grape leaves to serving tea, are vivid and bright. The intersecting plotlines allow the story to unfold perfectly. There isn't genuine suspense--this isn't a thriller--and the big reveal is not a sihocker, but the path from A to B is what's of interest here. ( )
  arosoff | Jul 11, 2021 |
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A NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER A READ WITH JENNA TODAY SHOW BOOK CLUB PICK  A GOODREADS CHOICE AWARDS FINALIST FOR BEST FICTION AND BEST DEBUT * BOOKBROWE'S BEST BOOK OF THE YEAR * A MARIE CLAIRE BEST WOMEN'S FICTION OF THE YEAR * A REAL SIMPLE BEST BOOK OF THE YEAR * A POPSUGAR BEST BOOK OF THE YEAR ALL WRITTEN BY FEMALES A New York Times Book Review Editors' Choice * A Washington Post 10 Books to Read in March * A Newsweek Best Book of the Summer * A USA Today Best Book of the Week * A Washington Book Review Difficult-To-Put-Down Novel * A Refinery 29 Best Books of the Month * A Buzzfeed News 4 Books We Couldn't Put Down Last Month * A New Arab Best Books by Arab Authors * An Electric Lit 20 Best Debuts of the First Half of 2019 * A The Millions Most Anticipated Books of 2019 "Garnering justified comparisons to Khaled Hosseini's A Thousand Splendid Suns... Etaf Rum's debut novel is a must-read about women mustering up the bravery to follow their inner voice."   --Refinery 29 In her debut novel Etaf Rum tells the story of three generations of Palestinian-American women struggling to express their individual desires within the confines of their Arab culture in the wake of shocking intimate violence in their community--a story of culture and honor, secrets and betrayals, love and violence. Set in an America at once foreign to many and staggeringly close at hand, A Woman Is No Man is an intimate glimpse into a controlling and closed cultural world, and a universal tale about family and the ways silence and shame can destroy those we have sworn to protect. "Where I come from, we've learned to silence ourselves. We've been taught that silence will save us. Where I come from, we keep these stories to ourselves. To tell them to the outside world is unheard of--dangerous, the ultimate shame." Palestine, 1990. Seventeen-year-old Isra prefers reading books to entertaining the suitors her father has chosen for her. Over the course of a week, the naïve and dreamy girl finds herself quickly betrothed and married, and is soon living in Brooklyn. There Isra struggles to adapt to the expectations of her oppressive mother-in-law Fareeda and strange new husband Adam, a pressure that intensifies as she begins to have children--four daughters instead of the sons Fareeda tells Isra she must bear. Brooklyn, 2008. Eighteen-year-old Deya, Isra's oldest daughter, must meet with potential husbands at her grandmother Fareeda's insistence, though her only desire is to go to college. Deya can't help but wonder if her options would have been different had her parents survived the car crash that killed them when Deya was only eight. But her grandmother is firm on the matter: the only way to secure a worthy future for Deya is through marriage to the right man. But fate has a will of its own, and soon Deya will find herself on an unexpected path that leads her to shocking truths about her family--knowledge that will force her to question everything she thought she knew about her parents, the past, and her own future.

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813.6 — Literature English (North America) American fiction 21st Century

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