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Calypso
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Calypso

MembresCritiquesPopularitéÉvaluation moyenneMentions
1,574828,742 (4.08)56
David Sedaris returns with his most deeply personal and darkly hilarious book. If you've ever laughed your way through David Sedaris's cheerfully misanthropic stories, you might think you know what you're getting with Calypso. You'd be wrong. When he buys a beach house on the Carolina coast, Sedaris envisions long, relaxing vacations spent playing board games and lounging in the sun with those he loves most. And life at the Sea Section, as he names the vacation home, is exactly as idyllic as he imagined, except for one tiny, vexing realization: it's impossible to take a vacation from yourself. With Calypso, Sedaris sets his formidable powers of observation toward middle age and mortality. Make no mistake: these stories are very, very funny--it's a book that can make you laugh 'til you snort, the way only family can. Sedaris's powers of observation have never been sharper, and his ability to shock readers into laughter unparalleled. But much of the comedy here is born out of that vertiginous moment when your own body betrays you and you realize that the story of your life is made up of more past than future. This is beach reading for people who detest beaches, required reading for those who loathe small talk and love a good tumor joke. Calypso is simultaneously Sedaris's darkest and warmest book yet--and it just might be his very best.… (plus d'informations)
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Titre:Calypso
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Calypso par David Sedaris

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» Voir aussi les 56 mentions

Affichage de 1-5 de 82 (suivant | tout afficher)
Always entertaining to listen to Sedaris read his book. He addresses serious issues (suicide, aging, political differences with parents), but always manages to have me laughing in the end. ( )
  carolfoisset | Oct 14, 2021 |
I'm new to David Sedaris and despite being well aware of his many books and essay collections, this is the first time I've dipped a toe into his literary ouevre, and let me tell you, this guy makes me laugh! Calypso is a collection of essays published in June 2018 and I thoroughly enjoyed listening to him narrate the audiobook.

Sedaris is a humourist (which I've learned is different to a comedian) and he shares his observational humour and revelations of varying degrees of importance about a range of topics, but largely including his family, upbringing with five siblings, ageing of his parents (and himself), and comments on society.

I loved the quirky family jokes and insights and each essay is delivered in an intelligent, yet self deprecating and insightful way that often made me laugh out loud or chuckle to myself. His wry sense of humour certainly isn't for everyone, and I was only too aware of Sedaris' white privilege shining through in many of his stories. That said, Sedaris seems to be extremely self aware in a way that made it easy for me to let this go and just enjoy the ride. Besides, who can hate on a guy for his white male privilege when his hobby is picking up litter by the side of the road.

There were many moments I stopped to repeat a phrase or enjoy a sentence again, like this one from half way through the book.

"There was never any problem making conversation with my mother. That was effortless. The topics springing from nowhere, and we'd move from one to the next in a way that made me think of a monkey gracefully swinging through the branches of a tree." Chapter 11, 3 hours and 20 minutes remaining

Employing a droll sense of humour and acerbic wit, Sedaris successfully maintains the balance between serious topics, like the death of his sister by suicide, to lighter moments like toilet troubles or the engagements he has with readers in the signing line of his shows. (I'd love to see him perform live if he comes back to Melbourne).

I enjoyed Calypso by David Sedaris so much that I've decided to go back to some of his earlier work and continue listening. Have you read any David Sedaris, seen him on talk shows or even perform live? Do you enjoy his sense of humour? If so, I'd love to hear about it. In the meantime, I recommend his work with caution. I don't know if I'd have enjoyed Calypso quite so much if I'd read his work instead of listening to it, and his humour is an acquired taste. But I can't get enough, so take from that what you will. ( )
  Carpe_Librum | Oct 11, 2021 |
My first Sedaris book. I enjoy dark or macabre humor - a lot. For the reviews describing it as “sidesplitting” and funny, all I can say is their appreciation for humor and mine are quite different.

His politics aside (comes across as hugely anti-Trump), I found his biases about conservatives and potential Trump voters to be offensively stereotyped. He comes off as an elitist snob. I suppose it shouldn’t be surprising that his humor misses the mark more than it lands.

I don’t know if he is still with his partner, but there are times when what he writes about Hugh and their relationship is downright mean.

He does have a few good bits that I chuckled over. But, if this is his typical work, I won’t be spending any more of my time with him. ( )
  AMKitty | Sep 30, 2021 |
David Sedaris delivers another book in which he looks at his life in a darkly humorous way. In this book, he and his family address getting older, health issues, and the death of his sister by suicide. He also talks about the triumphs of middle age, such as having a guest bedroom, going on book tours, and buying a beach house for his family to visit.

While this book was very much in the style of previous titles by Sedaris and again read by the author for the audio version (a mix of studio recordings and live events), something about it just didn't sit the same with me. I didn't find myself laughing as much as I usually do with with his books. It may have been my mood in the days listening to it or something else I cannot quite put my finger on.

Tried and true fans of Sedaris will likely still enjoy this book (or, as in my case, like it enough), but I would recommend another one of his books over this title to a newbie. ( )
  sweetiegherkin | Sep 26, 2021 |
Sedaris on Sedaris, or rather, the Sedarises: a ninety-something father and five children in middle age, plus assorted partners (e.g. Hugh), in-laws, and one child (David's niece Madelyn, who appears in a few essays, and who is apparently ruthless at the board game Sorry!). Heavy topics such as their younger sister's suicide and their father's hoarding are leavened by moments of hilarity and absurdity.

Quotes

Doesn't the blood of every suicide splash back on our faces? (Now We Are Five, 30)

At what point had I realized that class couldn't save you, that addiction or mental illness didn't care whether you'd taken piano lessons or spent a summer in Europe? (A House Divided, 56)

"Why can't you let people change? ...Why do you choose to remember the negative rather than the positive?" (Leviathan, 91)

I think of it as a switch that turns someone from a profession to a person, and it works both ways. (Your English Is So Good, 100)

London is five hours ahead of Washington, DC, except when it comes to gay marriage. In that case, it's two years and five hours ahead. (A Modest Proposal, 119)

We're like a pair of bad trapeze artists, reaching for each other's hands and missing every time. (The Silent Treatment, 138)

You're not supposed to talk about your good deeds, I know. It effectively negates them and in the process makes people hate you. (Sorry, 172)

Why does everything that counters [her] worldview have to be false? (Sorry, 175)

It's hard to even call it lying; rather, it's a form of insistence. (The Comey Memo, 256) ( )
  JennyArch | Aug 17, 2021 |
Affichage de 1-5 de 82 (suivant | tout afficher)
The author’s fans and newcomers alike will be richly rewarded by this sidesplitting collection.
ajouté par rretzler | modifierPublishers Weekly (starred review) (payer le site) (Mar 19, 2018)
 
In which the veteran humorist enters middle age with fine snark but some trepidation as well.
 
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David Sedaris returns with his most deeply personal and darkly hilarious book. If you've ever laughed your way through David Sedaris's cheerfully misanthropic stories, you might think you know what you're getting with Calypso. You'd be wrong. When he buys a beach house on the Carolina coast, Sedaris envisions long, relaxing vacations spent playing board games and lounging in the sun with those he loves most. And life at the Sea Section, as he names the vacation home, is exactly as idyllic as he imagined, except for one tiny, vexing realization: it's impossible to take a vacation from yourself. With Calypso, Sedaris sets his formidable powers of observation toward middle age and mortality. Make no mistake: these stories are very, very funny--it's a book that can make you laugh 'til you snort, the way only family can. Sedaris's powers of observation have never been sharper, and his ability to shock readers into laughter unparalleled. But much of the comedy here is born out of that vertiginous moment when your own body betrays you and you realize that the story of your life is made up of more past than future. This is beach reading for people who detest beaches, required reading for those who loathe small talk and love a good tumor joke. Calypso is simultaneously Sedaris's darkest and warmest book yet--and it just might be his very best.

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