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Pandemic 1918: Eyewitness Accounts from the…
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Pandemic 1918: Eyewitness Accounts from the Greatest Medical Holocaust in… (original 2018; édition 2018)

par Catharine Arnold (Auteur)

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Before AIDS or Ebola, there was the Spanish Flu -- Catharine Arnold's gripping narrative, Pandemic 1918, marks the 100th anniversary of an epidemic that altered world history. In January 1918, as World War I raged on, a new and terrifying virus began to spread across the globe. In three successive waves, from 1918 to 1919, influenza killed more than 50 million people. German soldiers termed it Blitzkatarrh, British soldiers referred to it as Flanders Grippe, but world-wide, the pandemic gained the notorious title of "Spanish Flu". Nowhere on earth escaped: the United States recorded 550,000 deaths (five times its total military fatalities in the war) while European deaths totaled over two million. Amid the war, some governments suppressed news of the outbreak. Even as entire battalions were decimated, with both the Allies and the Germans suffering massive casualties, the details of many servicemen's deaths were hidden to protect public morale. Meanwhile, civilian families were being struck down in their homes. The City of Philadelphia ran out of gravediggers and coffins, and mass burial trenches had to be excavated with steam shovels. Spanish flu conjured up the specter of the Black Death of 1348 and the great plague of 1665, while the medical profession, shattered after five terrible years of conflict, lacked the resources to contain and defeat this new enemy. Through primary and archival sources, historian Catharine Arnold gives readers the first truly global account of the terrible epidemic.… (plus d'informations)
Membre:wellreadcatlady
Titre:Pandemic 1918: Eyewitness Accounts from the Greatest Medical Holocaust in Modern History
Auteurs:Catharine Arnold (Auteur)
Info:St. Martin's Press (2018), Edition: First Edition, 368 pages
Collections:boxed, Votre bibliothèque, tbr-owned, physical-book, owned, borrowed, Read, À lire, Favoris
Évaluation:****
Mots-clés:borrowed, health, history, physical-book, non-fiction

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Pandemic 1918: Eyewitness Accounts from the Greatest Medical Holocaust in Modern History par Catharine Arnold (2018)

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Inspired to read this after my step-mother said that her grandfather became anti-vax after the WW1 with the Spanish Flu. Couldn’t find anything in here about the movement at that time although a writer with no medical training in 1950s did claim it was caused by the Vaccination programme used on the troops in Texas. (Overlooking the overcrowded conditions, that plenty of unvaccinated people died from it and it did not,stem from there). I suspect a bit of retrospective justification going on here. ( )
  mumoftheanimals | Nov 7, 2021 |
Fascinating look at the course of the Spanish flu of 1918-19, or as it was anthromorphized in the press's cartoonish figure of the "Spanish lady", a female figure with a death's head, dressed in black flamenco-style dress and mantilla. The earliest mention of any widespread epidemic was made by Hippocrates in 412 BC and we have had epidemics and pandemics of different origins and symptoms ever since, including now. The author mentions theories as to its origin, from the possible to the conspiratorial, and much of the book is taken from the writings, letters, or memoirs of people who had either witnessed it in others or had recovered from it themselves. Katherine Anne Porter, the writer, who recovered, felt it was a turning point in her life. The world would probably be a different place if FDR or Mahatma Gandhi had not recovered from their severe bouts with the "Spanish lady". The book was very prescient concerning public health measures, which we are using today. No cure was found; the disease just burned itself out. Not until the 1990s was the genome found. Viruses were not even discovered until the 1930s. Health professionals' earlier thinking of a bacterial origin for the Spanish flu led them into blind alleys.

A little girls' jump rope skipping rhyme from that period:
"I had a little bird,
And its name was Enza.
I opened the window
And in-flew-enza." ( )
  janerawoof | Dec 3, 2020 |
Absolutely fascinating, and that’s simply after reading the Prologue! Published on Aug 28, 2018, this is an eerie foretelling of past pandemic events, and those yet to come. Although Arnold could not predict the COVID19 pandemic of 2019-2020, the parallels the Spanish Lady, or flu, has with today’s COVID19 is uncanny. The prologue found me fascinated, and as I reach Chapter 1, I am hooked already.

The various stories take you across the globe as you get glimpses of those infected or those touched by the epidemic. Science of the day is interspersed and again, the parallels of the 1918 Flu and the 2020 Covid-19 outbreaks are amazing. A must-read.
*I received an arc from the publisher through NetGalley for an honest review ( )
  KimMcReads | Sep 22, 2020 |
This book was incredible. It is estimated 20 million people died in WWI. Just as that terrible debacle was maybe slowing down a new killer rose up to take war's place. The Spanish flu. Spanish, not because it started there, because Spain was neutral in WWI and didn't have a news blackout. I have always wondered about that. I have also always wondered how 100 million people could die of the "flu" and people know nothing of it today in the COVID era. My great aunt Katie died in 1918 of the Spanish flu. She was 18 years old. This disease was cruel. Instead of the usual flu taking the old it took young people, in the prime of life. It took others too but it especially liked people in their teens and twenties and very healthy. The brilliance of this book is not the statistics but the voices speaking from that time as they talk again and are heard. They talk of the days leading up to the flu, the parades, and the innocence. They talk of having the disease and how painful it was, they talk of watching their loved ones die from it. They talk of running out of coffins, bodies stacked like wood, mass graves, and the smell. They talked of grief. One little girl told how she loved church bells until they became synonymous with funerals. The book talked about the heroism of the medical people who fought the disease, many of them dying also. I had to stop reading this book sometimes because of the sadness I felt for these people. People are so resilient because life goes on and they got on with it. I would like to thank Netgalley and the publisher for allowing me to read this book in exchange for a review. ( )
  BarbaraS2016 | Apr 22, 2020 |
I've always found the Spanish flu fascinating, simply because we don't hear much about it. It had never been mentioned in any of my history classes in high school; it was only when I took a course in Twentieth Century European history that I heard of the Spanish flu for the first time.

This book is a good overview of the Spanish flu epidemic, and I definitely learned a few new things. It's based on people's personal experiences during the epidemic, so there's not an overarching organization to this book. It's more a loose collection of "what happened in this part of the world" chapters. I would have liked a bit more structure to the book. ( )
  schatzi | Jan 16, 2019 |
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It was beginning of the rout of civilisation, of the massacre of mankind. - H.G. Wells, War of the Worlds
The Captain looked suddenly tired. "Sometimes I think, Mr. Benson, that the very air is poisoned with the damned influenza. For four years now millions of rotting corpses have covered a good part of Europe from the Channel to Arabia. We can't escape it even when we're 2,000 miles out to sea. It seems to come as it did on our last trip, like a dark and invisible fog. - Herbert Faulkner West, HMS Cephalonia: A Story of the North Atlantic in 1918
Fly this plague-stricken spot! The hot, foul air / Is rank with pestilence - the crowded marts / And public ways, once populous with life, / Are still and noisome as a churchyard vault; / Aghast and shuddering, Nature holds her breath / In abject fear, and feels at her strong heart / The deadly fangs of death." - Susanna Moodie, "Our Journey up the Country"
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Dedicated to the memory of my grandparents Aubrey Gladwin and Lalage Bagley Gladwin, and the millions like them who perished in the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918-19.
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As the sun sank over a windswept Yorkshire churchyard in September 2008, a battered lead-lined coffin was reburied hours after being opened for the first time in eighty-nine years.
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Before AIDS or Ebola, there was the Spanish Flu -- Catharine Arnold's gripping narrative, Pandemic 1918, marks the 100th anniversary of an epidemic that altered world history. In January 1918, as World War I raged on, a new and terrifying virus began to spread across the globe. In three successive waves, from 1918 to 1919, influenza killed more than 50 million people. German soldiers termed it Blitzkatarrh, British soldiers referred to it as Flanders Grippe, but world-wide, the pandemic gained the notorious title of "Spanish Flu". Nowhere on earth escaped: the United States recorded 550,000 deaths (five times its total military fatalities in the war) while European deaths totaled over two million. Amid the war, some governments suppressed news of the outbreak. Even as entire battalions were decimated, with both the Allies and the Germans suffering massive casualties, the details of many servicemen's deaths were hidden to protect public morale. Meanwhile, civilian families were being struck down in their homes. The City of Philadelphia ran out of gravediggers and coffins, and mass burial trenches had to be excavated with steam shovels. Spanish flu conjured up the specter of the Black Death of 1348 and the great plague of 1665, while the medical profession, shattered after five terrible years of conflict, lacked the resources to contain and defeat this new enemy. Through primary and archival sources, historian Catharine Arnold gives readers the first truly global account of the terrible epidemic.

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