AccueilGroupesDiscussionsExplorerTendances
Site de recherche
Ce site utilise des cookies pour fournir nos services, optimiser les performances, pour les analyses, et (si vous n'êtes pas connecté) pour les publicités. En utilisant Librarything, vous reconnaissez avoir lu et compris nos conditions générales d'utilisation et de services. Votre utilisation du site et de ses services vaut acceptation de ces conditions et termes.
Hide this

Résultats trouvés sur Google Books

Cliquer sur une vignette pour aller sur Google Books.

Chargement...

The Complete Barchester Chronicles

par Anthony Trollope

MembresCritiquesPopularitéÉvaluation moyenneDiscussions / Mentions
1674136,775 (4.45)1 / 49
Trollope's panoramic, six-volume portrayal of the professional and landed classes of Victorian England, The Barsetshire Novels, are as a group one of the great works of 19th-century English fiction. Following the intrigues of ambition and love in the cathedral town of Barchester, thesenovels--the first serial fiction in English literature--include both Trollope's most popular novel, Barchester Towers, as well as his own personal favorite, The Last Chronicle of Barset. Now Oxford is bringing the Barsetshire Novels back in an elegantly crafted hard-bound set--with acid-free papersand durable binding--allowing readers unfamiliar with these classic volumes the perfect opportunity to enjoy them at last.These books teem with the life of 19th-century England. Whether describing gracious country living, with croquet and tea on the lawn, or the cut and thrust of London life in the 1860s, Trollope was one of the master chroniclers of his age. But perhaps the most endearing aspect of Trollope'sart are the characters he created. Here readers will find Trollope's most charming heroine, the bewitching Lily Dale; the upright clergyman Mr. Harding, central character of the first novel, The Warden; the disreputable Duke of Omnium; the reticent, stern, honorable Doctor Thorne; the amiable andbreezy Stanhope family; and the oily symbol of progress Mr. Slope. Each is skillfully handled with that subtlety of ironic observation and the pleasant humor that won Trollope such a wide and appreciative readership.Nathaniel Hawthorne hailed Trollope's novels as "just as real as if some giant had hewn a great lump out of the earth and put it under a glass case, with all its inhabitants going about their daily business and not suspecting that they were being made a show of." Few authors have captured that"daily business" with as much sensitivity and insight as Trollope.… (plus d'informations)
Chargement...

Inscrivez-vous à LibraryThing pour découvrir si vous aimerez ce livre

4 sur 4
I want to tell the world about the brilliant novel, The Warden, by Anthony Trollope, published in 1855, and one of six novels in his series “Chronicles of Barsetshire.” The main character is the kind and honorable Rev. Harding, and he is the precentor of a cathedral in a small country town in west England. I found it refreshing to see how Harding thinks and acts when he is engaged in the fight of his life. His reputation is attacked and his right to be Warden of Hiram’s Hospital is threatened by a relentless reformer and an attack dog of a tabloid newspaper. Harding lives with his youngest daughter and enjoys a quiet and busy life helping people, doing many good works and caring for the 12 old men who have been given a comfortable retirement life at the Hospital, which was established for men who are poor and no longer able to work. There is a love interest for his daughter, an unyielding son-in-law who defends the church and Harding, plenty of subtle humor and a charming picture of the country life.
If you are like me you will want to have the next book “Barchester Towers” in hand so you can begin reading it as soon as you finish “The Warden.” This Kindle edition has all six novels and is set up nicely. ( )
1 voter hangen | Mar 15, 2015 |
The second, third and fourth books in this series rank among my all times favourites. However, I find the Warden and Lilian Dale, as characters, unappealing, therefore I did not enjoy the first, fifth and sixth books so much. However, throughout all the books, Trollope's mastery of the English language is almost unparalleled and he provides a fascinating insight into Victorian England. ( )
  A.J.Lumaren | Sep 13, 2013 |
I suspect that reading all six Barsetshire novels in one sitting (January 11-April 5, thank you Kindle) probably robs them of some of their charm. The formulaic nature of the serialized novel is thrown into higher relief when you read one after another with nothing in between, and so are some of Trollope's weaknesses as a novelist.

Read the rest at my blog: http://thegrimreader.blogspot.com/2013/04/i-return-from-barsetshire.html ( )
1 voter nohrt4me2 | Apr 11, 2013 |
The "Chronicles of Barsetshire" is a series of six novels by English author Anthony Trollope, set in the west-country Cathedral city of Barchester.

The beautifully-written epic saga concerns the dealings of the clergy and the gentry, and the political, amatory, and social maneuverings that go on among and between them.

Barsetshire is the county in which the novels take place. The county town and cathedral town is Barchester. Other towns mentioned in the novels include Silverbridge, Hogglestock and Greshamsbury.

Included in this volume:
Book One: The Warden -- Mr Septimus Harding, elderly warden of Hiram's Hospital and Precentor of Barchester Cathedral. The story concerns the impact upon Harding and his circle when a zealous young reformer, John Bold, launches a campaign to expose the disparity in the apportionment of the charity's income between its object, the bedesmen, and its officer, Mr Harding. John Bold embarks on this campaign out of a spirit of public duty despite his romantic involvement with Eleanor and previously cordial relations with Mr Harding...

Book Two: Barchester Towers -- The much loved bishop having died, all expectations are that his son, Archdeacon Grantly, also a clergyman, will gain the office in his place. Instead, owing to the passage of the power of patronage to a new Prime Minister, a newcomer, Bishop Proudie, gains the see. His wife, Mrs Proudie, exercises an undue influence over the new bishop, making herself unpopular with right-thinking members of the clergy and their families...

Book Three: Doctor Thorne -- The romantic problems of Mary Thorne, niece of Doctor Thomas Thorne (a member of a junior branch of the family of Mr Wilfred Thorne who appeared in the previous novel), and Frank Gresham, the only son of the local squire. Major themes of the book are the social pain and exclusion caused by illegitimacy, the nefarious effects of the demon drink, and the difficulties of romantic attachments outside one's social class...

Book Four: Framley Parsonage -- Mark Robarts is a young vicar, newly arrived in the village of Framley in Barsetshire. This "living" has come into his hands through Lady Lufton, the mother of his childhood friend Ludovic, Lord Lufton. Mark has ambitions to further his career and begins to seek connections in the county's high society. He is soon preyed upon by local Member of Parliament Mr Sowerby...

Book Five: The Small House at Allington -- Lily has for a long time been secretly loved by John Eames, a junior clerk at the Income Tax Office, while Bell is in love with the local doctor, James Crofts. The handsome and personable, somewhat mercenary Adolphus Crosbie is introduced into the circle by the squire's nephew, Bernard Dale...

Book Six: The Last Chronicle of Barset -- An indigent but learned clergyman, the Reverend Josiah Crawley, the curate of Hogglestock, as he stands accused of stealing. It also features the courtship of the Rev. Mr Crawley's daughter, Grace, and Major Henry Grantly, son of the wealthy Archdeacon Grantly. The Archdeacon, although allowing that Grace is a lady, doesn't think her of high enough rank or wealth for his widowed son; his position is strengthened by the Reverend Mr Crawley's apparent crime. Almost broken by poverty and trouble, the Reverend Mr Crawley hardly knows himself if he is guilty or not...

These are wonderful, well-written thrilling and vigorous novels!
  vanpelten | Aug 15, 2011 |
4 sur 4
aucune critique | ajouter une critique

Appartient à la série

Contient

Fait l'objet d'une adaptation dans

A inspiré

Vous devez vous identifier pour modifier le Partage des connaissances.
Pour plus d'aide, voir la page Aide sur le Partage des connaissances [en anglais].
Titre canonique
Informations provenant du Partage des connaissances anglais. Modifiez pour passer à votre langue.
Titre original
Titres alternatifs
Date de première publication
Personnes ou personnages
Lieux importants
Évènements importants
Films connexes
Prix et distinctions
Épigraphe
Dédicace
Premiers mots
Citations
Derniers mots
Notice de désambigüisation
Informations provenant du Partage des connaissances anglais. Modifiez pour passer à votre langue.
Some sets included appear to only have five novel listed: however, this is simply because the rest of the title was cut off, as checking ISBNs show that they are 6-novel sets.
Directeur(-trice)(s) de publication
Courtes éloges de critiques
Langue d'origine
DDC/MDS canonique
LCC canonique

Références à cette œuvre sur des ressources externes.

Wikipédia en anglais

Aucun

Trollope's panoramic, six-volume portrayal of the professional and landed classes of Victorian England, The Barsetshire Novels, are as a group one of the great works of 19th-century English fiction. Following the intrigues of ambition and love in the cathedral town of Barchester, thesenovels--the first serial fiction in English literature--include both Trollope's most popular novel, Barchester Towers, as well as his own personal favorite, The Last Chronicle of Barset. Now Oxford is bringing the Barsetshire Novels back in an elegantly crafted hard-bound set--with acid-free papersand durable binding--allowing readers unfamiliar with these classic volumes the perfect opportunity to enjoy them at last.These books teem with the life of 19th-century England. Whether describing gracious country living, with croquet and tea on the lawn, or the cut and thrust of London life in the 1860s, Trollope was one of the master chroniclers of his age. But perhaps the most endearing aspect of Trollope'sart are the characters he created. Here readers will find Trollope's most charming heroine, the bewitching Lily Dale; the upright clergyman Mr. Harding, central character of the first novel, The Warden; the disreputable Duke of Omnium; the reticent, stern, honorable Doctor Thorne; the amiable andbreezy Stanhope family; and the oily symbol of progress Mr. Slope. Each is skillfully handled with that subtlety of ironic observation and the pleasant humor that won Trollope such a wide and appreciative readership.Nathaniel Hawthorne hailed Trollope's novels as "just as real as if some giant had hewn a great lump out of the earth and put it under a glass case, with all its inhabitants going about their daily business and not suspecting that they were being made a show of." Few authors have captured that"daily business" with as much sensitivity and insight as Trollope.

Aucune description trouvée dans une bibliothèque

Description du livre
Résumé sous forme de haïku

Couvertures populaires

Vos raccourcis

Évaluation

Moyenne: (4.45)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 2
3.5 2
4 10
4.5 2
5 17

Est-ce vous ?

Devenez un(e) auteur LibraryThing.

 

À propos | Contact | LibraryThing.com | Respect de la vie privée et règles d'utilisation | Aide/FAQ | Blog | Boutique | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliothèques historiques | Critiques en avant-première | Partage des connaissances | 172,045,304 livres! | Barre supérieure: Toujours visible