AccueilGroupesDiscussionsPlusTendances
Site de recherche
Ce site utilise des cookies pour fournir nos services, optimiser les performances, pour les analyses, et (si vous n'êtes pas connecté) pour les publicités. En utilisant Librarything, vous reconnaissez avoir lu et compris nos conditions générales d'utilisation et de services. Votre utilisation du site et de ses services vaut acceptation de ces conditions et termes.
Hide this

Résultats trouvés sur Google Books

Cliquer sur une vignette pour aller sur Google Books.

The Canon: A Whirligig Tour of the Beautiful…
Chargement...

The Canon: A Whirligig Tour of the Beautiful Basics of Science (édition 2008)

par Natalie Angier

MembresCritiquesPopularitéÉvaluation moyenneMentions
1,526438,997 (3.61)59
Award-winning science journalist Angier takes us on a "guided twirligig through the scientific canon." She draws on conversations with hundreds of the world's top scientists, and her own work as a reporter for the New York Times, to create an entertaining guide to scientific literacy--a joyride through the major scientific disciplines: physics, chemistry, biology, geology, and astronomy. It's for anyone who wants to understand the great issues of our time--from stem cells and bird flu to evolution and global warming. It's also one of those rare books that reignites our childhood delight in figuring out how things work: we learn what's actually happening when our ice cream melts or our coffee gets cold, what our liver cells do when we eat a caramel, how the horse shows evolution at work, and that we really are all made of stardust.--From publisher description.… (plus d'informations)
Membre:marinahale
Titre:The Canon: A Whirligig Tour of the Beautiful Basics of Science
Auteurs:Natalie Angier
Info:Mariner Books (2008), Edition: Reprint, Paperback, 304 pages
Collections:Votre bibliothèque
Évaluation:**
Mots-clés:Aucun

Détails de l'œuvre

The Canon: A Whirligig Tour of the Beautiful Basics of Science par Natalie Angier

Chargement...

Inscrivez-vous à LibraryThing pour découvrir si vous aimerez ce livre

Actuellement, il n'y a pas de discussions au sujet de ce livre.

» Voir aussi les 59 mentions

Anglais (41)  Italien (1)  Catalan (1)  Toutes les langues (43)
Affichage de 1-5 de 43 (suivant | tout afficher)
Subtitled: “A Whirligig Tour of the Beautiful Basics of Science.”

I read Natalie Angier’s The Canon because I wanted to bone up on areas of science where my knowledge and understanding lag behind. I’m a motivated layman when it comes to astronomy, but the other chapters here: 1. Thinking Scientifically; 2. Probabilities; 3. Calibration; 4. Physics; 5. Chemistry; 6. Evolutionary Biology; 7. Molecular Biology; and 8. Geology (Astronomy is the 9th and last chapter) promised a wealth of material to fulfill my desire. They held a lot more than that.

Angier is a Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times journalist covering science. She’s also quite a card. She presents her material not only with a strict, sensible logic, but she leavens it throughout with breezy throw-away lines, like: “power lines … fastened onto high-tension towers that loom phantasmically over the highway, like a procession of giant Michelin Men with arms of aluminum lace,” or in reference to the snout of the star-nosed mole: “Ringing its snout are twenty-two fleshy, pinkish-red, highly sensitive tentacles that … look like a pinwheel of earthworms, or children’s fingers poking up from below in a cheap but surprisingly effective horror movie.”

It’s easy to see why - and highly appreciated - that Angier included multiple throw-away phrases on nearly every page: she set herself a gigantic task, which would feature untold facts and theories, and she needed a way to engage general readers. As often as she quips throughout her book, it never descends into anything seriously jokey, or ironic. Her science, as you would expect, is quite up to snuff, her passion is real, and her hope for scientific literacy is fervent. These attributes add up to a very worthwhile book. If your interest extends to modern science, here is an excellent way to fill in any sketchy areas you feel you have. Take it up! ( )
  LukeS | Jan 27, 2021 |
I'm debating whether it is outdated. ( )
  MarianneAudio | Aug 18, 2020 |
The goals of The Canon are twofold. A. Describe what leaders in the scientific fields consider to be the basic concepts of their respective disciplines. B. Present the concepts such that the layman without a scientific background will find understandable and entertaining. Perhaps the hidden agenda is to allow parents to bone up on enough current science to help their daughters with their homework or to sound knowledgeable when taking the little tykes to museums of science and technology. Dinosaurs are not covered. Problems: “Understandable” means no math. Arguably this doesn’t do justice to the aesthetics and difficulty of doing science and maybe guts the concept. A number of the LT reviews didn’t like the relentless plays on words and other silliness that accompany the summary/descriptions, but the kids like it, I bet, and probably come across better at bookstore readings. Another book I’m reading, The Hindus, also is a little heavy on the humor (or just heavy humor—see, it’s catching).
The first part is on methodology: How to think scientifically. Probabilities (statistics). Calibration: how to describe the very small and the very large using mathematical notation.
The second part is chapters on Physics. Chemistry. Evolutionary biology. Microbiology. Geology. and Astronomy. In the discipline chapters the methodology chapters are put to use: the focus is on very small things: atomic structure, DNA, cell development, and very large things: planets, stars, galaxies, evolutionary time. The last chapter, Astronomy, via the Big Bang Theory, brings together the infinitesimally small and the very very large universe. The best explanatory work is on DNA and cell structure (a couple of really good pages are in the Geology chapter), but the author also does a good job relating the initial exposition on atomic structure in the Physics chapter to explain specific structures In Chemistry. ( )
  featherbear | Jun 9, 2015 |
A succinct tour of the foundational (key) concepts /theories in the sciences: Scientific Thinking /Method; Probability; Calibration / Scale; Physics; Chemistry; Evolutionary Biology; Molecular Biology; Geology & Astronomy. Angier impresses with her grasp of scientific subjects and her ability to communicate these through both exposition and analogy. Most of the concepts will not be new to interested readers of science books for non-scientists. Writing for a lay audience means utilizing language rather than math to communicate complex ideas. In fact, of course, some science isn't translatable into words. As one scientist interviewed by the author admits, what can be perfectly comprehensible to him mathematically (the age & size of the universe, for example) may still be incomprehensibly mind-boggling personally. My one quibble with Angier, as a writer, is that her use of analogy, which is quite helpful at times, veers too often to the overly glib. She often piles up the wise-cracks, which in the end distract from, rather than serve her purposes. Humor and felicitous analogy aid mightily in any presentation of scientific topics to non-scientists. However, there is a point at which such tools turn into tricks, where a folksy approach becomes too smart alecky for its own good. ( )
1 voter Paulagraph | May 25, 2014 |
A series of essays outlining what each lay person should know about Math, Physics, Biology, Geology, and Astronomy. Many are very basic, for me anyway, except the Biology one, which I guess I still don't understand very well. I enjoyed it. ( )
  stuart10er | Nov 5, 2013 |
Affichage de 1-5 de 43 (suivant | tout afficher)
aucune critique | ajouter une critique

» Ajouter d'autres auteur(e)s (3 possibles)

Nom de l'auteur(e)RôleType d'auteurŒuvre ?Statut
Natalie Angierauteur(e) principal(e)toutes les éditionscalculé
Overholtzer, RobertConcepteurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Vous devez vous identifier pour modifier le Partage des connaissances.
Pour plus d'aide, voir la page Aide sur le Partage des connaissances [en anglais].
Titre canonique
Titre original
Titres alternatifs
Date de première publication
Personnes ou personnages
Lieux importants
Évènements importants
Films connexes
Prix et distinctions
Informations provenant du Partage des connaissances anglais. Modifiez pour passer à votre langue.
Épigraphe
Dédicace
Informations provenant du Partage des connaissances anglais. Modifiez pour passer à votre langue.
For Rick, my one in 6.5 x 10 to the 9th
Premiers mots
Informations provenant du Partage des connaissances anglais. Modifiez pour passer à votre langue.
When the second of her two children turned thirteen, my sister decided that it finally was time to let their membership lapse in two familiar family haunts: the science museum and the zoo.
Citations
Derniers mots
Informations provenant du Partage des connaissances anglais. Modifiez pour passer à votre langue.
(Cliquez pour voir. Attention : peut vendre la mèche.)
Notice de désambigüisation
Directeur(-trice)(s) de publication
Courtes éloges de critiques
Informations provenant du Partage des connaissances anglais. Modifiez pour passer à votre langue.
Langue d'origine
DDC/MDS canonique
LCC canonique

Références à cette œuvre sur des ressources externes.

Wikipédia en anglais (4)

Award-winning science journalist Angier takes us on a "guided twirligig through the scientific canon." She draws on conversations with hundreds of the world's top scientists, and her own work as a reporter for the New York Times, to create an entertaining guide to scientific literacy--a joyride through the major scientific disciplines: physics, chemistry, biology, geology, and astronomy. It's for anyone who wants to understand the great issues of our time--from stem cells and bird flu to evolution and global warming. It's also one of those rare books that reignites our childhood delight in figuring out how things work: we learn what's actually happening when our ice cream melts or our coffee gets cold, what our liver cells do when we eat a caramel, how the horse shows evolution at work, and that we really are all made of stardust.--From publisher description.

Aucune description trouvée dans une bibliothèque

Description du livre
Résumé sous forme de haïku

Couvertures populaires

Vos raccourcis

Genres

Classification décimale de Melvil (CDD)

500 — Natural sciences and mathematics General Science General Science

Classification de la Bibliothèque du Congrès

Évaluation

Moyenne: (3.61)
0.5 2
1 11
1.5 1
2 15
2.5 4
3 45
3.5 14
4 68
4.5 10
5 43

Est-ce vous ?

Devenez un(e) auteur LibraryThing.

 

À propos | Contact | LibraryThing.com | Respect de la vie privée et règles d'utilisation | Aide/FAQ | Blog | Boutique | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliothèques historiques | Critiques en avant-première | Partage des connaissances | 162,289,483 livres! | Barre supérieure: Toujours visible