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Concussion par Jeanne Marie Laskas
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Concussion (original 2015; édition 2015)

par Jeanne Marie Laskas (Auteur)

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2141595,888 (4.35)10
NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER * The riveting, unlikely story of Dr. Bennet Omalu, the pathologist who first identified CTE in professional football players, a discovery that challenges the existence of America's favorite sport and puts Omalu in the crosshairs of football's most powerful corporation: the NFL   Jeanne Marie Laskas first met the young forensic pathologist Dr. Bennet Omalu in 2009, while reporting a story for GQ that would go on to inspire the movie Concussion. Omalu told her about a day in September 2002, when, in a dingy morgue in downtown Pittsburgh, he picked up a scalpel and made a discovery that would rattle America in ways he'd never intended. Omalu was new to America, chasing the dream, a deeply spiritual man escaping the wounds of civil war in Nigeria. The body on the slab in front of him belonged to a fifty-year-old named Mike Webster, aka "Iron Mike," a Hall of Fame center for the Pittsburgh Steelers, one of the greatest ever to play the game. After retiring in 1990, Webster had suffered a dizzyingly steep decline. Toward the end of his life, he was living out of his van, tasering himself to relieve his chronic pain, and fixing his rotting teeth with Super Glue. How did this happen?, Omalu asked himself. How did a young man like Mike Webster end up like this? The search for answers would change Omalu's life forever and put him in the crosshairs of one of the most powerful corporations in America: the National Football League. What Omalu discovered in Webster's brain--proof that Iron Mike's mental deterioration was no accident but a disease caused by blows to the head that could affect everyone playing the game--was the one truth the NFL wanted to ignore.   Taut, gripping, and gorgeously told, Concussion is the stirring story of one unlikely man's decision to stand up to a multibillion-dollar colossus, and to tell the world the truth.   Praise for Concussion   "A gripping medical mystery and a dazzling portrait of the young scientist no one wanted to listen to . . . a fabulous, essential read."--Rebecca Skloot, author of The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks "The story of Dr. Bennet Omalu's battle against the NFL is classic David and Goliath stuff, and Jeanne Marie Laskas--one of my favorite writers on earth--makes it as exciting as any great courtroom or gridiron drama. A riveting, powerful human tale--and a master class on how to tell a story."--Charles Duhigg, author of The Power of Habit   "Bennet Omalu forced football to reckon with head trauma. The NFL doesn't want you to hear his story, but Jeanne Marie Laskas makes it unforgettable. This book is gripping, eye-opening, and full of heart."--Emily Bazelon, author of Sticks and Stones… (plus d'informations)
Membre:AlleghenyCounty
Titre:Concussion
Auteurs:Jeanne Marie Laskas (Auteur)
Info:Random House Trade Paperbacks (2015), Edition: Illustrated, 288 pages
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Concussion par Jeanne Marie Laskas (2015)

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A fascinating read that explores a number of issues: the corruption of large corporations, the importance of truth seekers and untainted science, racism and narrative ownership. I'm glad Laskas gave Dr. Bennet Omalu the spotlight he deserved for his groundbreaking discovery.

While there are not too many surprises in this book (especially if you have followed this story in the media) it was a quick interesting read that tells the story of a generous and kind human being doing his best in the name of science, despite the roadblocks he faces along the way. In a story with a multitude of despicable characters, Laskas focuses on the one who can inspire hope. ( )
  mackinsquash | Aug 15, 2020 |
A worthy and interesting read. This tells the story of an immigrant from Nigeria who discovered how dangerous multiple hits to the head are over time and tried to bring it to the public's awareness, especially in light of our "national" pastime, football. The problem being that the NFL and the public, didn't really want to know about it.

The story dragged in a few places, felt like it was padded a bit, but always pulled me back in. It was both discouraging that so many health discoveries are predicated on big money funding the research and politics, and heartening that honest scientists can still have a voice if they speak the truth loud enough and long enough. I haven't seen the movie this book was based on, nor have I read the article that the movie was based on, but I found the discussion of concussions very interesting, having lived through one of my own recently. It is a frightening prospect and I can't imagine going through it day after day and week after week as many football players do. ( )
  MrsLee | Dec 25, 2019 |
Bennet Omalu grew up in Nigeria, cherished as one of the family's two "geniuses," and as the family's "angel," born when his father was nearly killed but somehow survived. Bennet thought, though, that his reputation for genius came from the fact that he used books and study to escape a world that was too loud and boisterous for him. When at sixteen he finally has to attend school away from home, without any of his siblings, he develops a crushing depression that he struggles with for many years. Despite this, he keeps going, gets his medical degree, and goes to America, in large part to escape the chaos and corruption of Nigeria.

In America, after some unlikely twists and turns, he winds up in Pittsburgh, working in the coroner's office, and doing the autopsy on former Pittsburgh Steeler Mike Webster.

Omalu doesn't even know what a "Steeler" is. He has no interest in American football. He has seen a few games on TV, though, and he has serious questions about what the violent game does to players' brains. He strongly suspects that the stories he's hearing about Webster "going crazy" after his career ended are unfair, and reflect brain damage due to the the game.

So he looks for damage, and finds something earthshaking.

The book intertwines Omalu's struggles with depression, his struggles to adapt to live in America, so different from his tiny home village in Nigeria, and his struggles to get his explosive discovery first in Webster's brain and then in the brains of one NFL player after another, recognized, acknowledged, and acted on by an NFL heavily invested in denying his results and not paying the costs of the permanent, life-changing damage done to its players.

Bennet Omalu had no idea what fight he was taking on when he started, but once he does, he won't back down. This is a compelling story, of Omalu's personal growth and of a medical discovery that is just beginning even now to make changes in the NFL, and in America's relationship with football Laskas dos a marvelous job conveying the intricacies and complications in a clear and concise way.

Recommended.

I received a free electronic galley of this book from the publisher via NetGalley. ( )
  LisCarey | Sep 19, 2018 |
Over the past few years, the long-term dangers associated with playing professional football (and we're talking American football and the NFL here, not soccer) have received a lot of attention. Former players are being diagnosed with dementia and other traumatic brain injuries at an alarming rate, and at far younger ages than the general population. This is considered common knowledge today, but it wasn't that long ago that nobody knew any of it was happening. It took a medical examiner in Pittsburgh, a Nigerian immigrant doctor who knew nothing about football, to first sound the alarm. Who Bennett Omalu is, how he came to be the first to discover and name CTE (chronic traumatic encephalopathy) and what has happened to him since is the subject of Laskas' absorbing book.

Laskas first wrote about Omalu and the concussion issue in a 2009 article in GQ magazine, and the book is an expansion of that original article. I found Omalu's life story extremely compelling, from his childhood in Nigeria to his emigration to the U.S. to attend medical school. His life was far from a walk in the park, but throughout the book Laskas shows what most would consider his naïvete in dealing with the powerful forces of the NFL, who stonewalled every attempt to highlight football's dangers, to the way racism allowed other — white — doctors to steal the credit and the notoriety for his discoveries. He is an immensely appealing protagonist, and Laskas is skilled at letting his humanity shine through.

At the other end of the spectrum is the NFL, whose underhanded actions in denying health benefits and support to former players who were clearly injured by the game are simply disgusting and immoral. As another football season gets underway, it's hard for me to imagine watching any of these games any longer, even my beloved Iowa Hawkeyes. I'm not about to judge anyone who comes to a different conclusion, but that's just where I seem to have landed now.

I should add that the book was made into a movie starring Will Smith, which got good reviews. I haven't seen it yet but I'd like to now that I've read the book. ( )
  rosalita | Sep 3, 2018 |
This book was very interesting. Brought to life a lot of issues I had no knowledge of. I enjoyed the writing and look forward to seeing the movie. ( )
  karenvg3 | Mar 19, 2018 |
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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER * The riveting, unlikely story of Dr. Bennet Omalu, the pathologist who first identified CTE in professional football players, a discovery that challenges the existence of America's favorite sport and puts Omalu in the crosshairs of football's most powerful corporation: the NFL   Jeanne Marie Laskas first met the young forensic pathologist Dr. Bennet Omalu in 2009, while reporting a story for GQ that would go on to inspire the movie Concussion. Omalu told her about a day in September 2002, when, in a dingy morgue in downtown Pittsburgh, he picked up a scalpel and made a discovery that would rattle America in ways he'd never intended. Omalu was new to America, chasing the dream, a deeply spiritual man escaping the wounds of civil war in Nigeria. The body on the slab in front of him belonged to a fifty-year-old named Mike Webster, aka "Iron Mike," a Hall of Fame center for the Pittsburgh Steelers, one of the greatest ever to play the game. After retiring in 1990, Webster had suffered a dizzyingly steep decline. Toward the end of his life, he was living out of his van, tasering himself to relieve his chronic pain, and fixing his rotting teeth with Super Glue. How did this happen?, Omalu asked himself. How did a young man like Mike Webster end up like this? The search for answers would change Omalu's life forever and put him in the crosshairs of one of the most powerful corporations in America: the National Football League. What Omalu discovered in Webster's brain--proof that Iron Mike's mental deterioration was no accident but a disease caused by blows to the head that could affect everyone playing the game--was the one truth the NFL wanted to ignore.   Taut, gripping, and gorgeously told, Concussion is the stirring story of one unlikely man's decision to stand up to a multibillion-dollar colossus, and to tell the world the truth.   Praise for Concussion   "A gripping medical mystery and a dazzling portrait of the young scientist no one wanted to listen to . . . a fabulous, essential read."--Rebecca Skloot, author of The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks "The story of Dr. Bennet Omalu's battle against the NFL is classic David and Goliath stuff, and Jeanne Marie Laskas--one of my favorite writers on earth--makes it as exciting as any great courtroom or gridiron drama. A riveting, powerful human tale--and a master class on how to tell a story."--Charles Duhigg, author of The Power of Habit   "Bennet Omalu forced football to reckon with head trauma. The NFL doesn't want you to hear his story, but Jeanne Marie Laskas makes it unforgettable. This book is gripping, eye-opening, and full of heart."--Emily Bazelon, author of Sticks and Stones

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