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Furiously Happy

par Jenny Lawson

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2,9361734,121 (4.04)140
"In Furiously Happy, #1 New York Times bestselling author Jenny Lawson explores her lifelong battle with mental illness. A hysterical, ridiculous book about crippling depression and anxiety? That sounds like a terrible idea. But terrible ideas are what Jenny does best.As Jenny says: "Some people might think that being 'furiously happy' is just an excuse to be stupid and irresponsible and invite a herd of kangaroos over to your house without telling your husband first because you suspect he would say no since he's never particularly liked kangaroos. And that would be ridiculous because no one would invite a herd of kangaroos into their house. Two is the limit. I speak from personal experience. My husband says that none is the new limit. I say he should have been clearer about that before I rented all those kangaroos. "Most of my favorite people are dangerously fucked-up but you'd never guess because we've learned to bare it so honestly that it becomes the new normal. Like John Hughes wrote in The Breakfast Club, 'We're all pretty bizarre. Some of us are just better at hiding it.' Except go back and cross out the word 'hiding.'"Furiously Happy is about "taking those moments when things are fine and making them amazing, because those moments are what make us who we are, and they're the same moments we take into battle with us when our brains declare war on our very existence. It's the difference between "surviving life" and "living life". It's the difference between "taking a shower" and "teaching your monkey butler how to shampoo your hair." It's the difference between being "sane" and being "furiously happy."Lawson is beloved around the world for her inimitable humor and honesty, and in Furiously Happy, she is at her snort-inducing funniest. This is a book about embracing everything that makes us who we are - the beautiful and the flawed - and then using it to find joy in fantastic and outrageous ways. Because as Jenny's mom says, "Maybe 'crazy' isn't so bad after all." Sometimes crazy is just right"--… (plus d'informations)
Récemment ajouté parJaneneBate, sdevans4, SabethaDanes, tlclaw06, poetryandjoetry, Bibajima, bibliothèque privée
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Affichage de 1-5 de 173 (suivant | tout afficher)
You guys. This book was exactly what I needed to hear.
“Pretend you’re good at it.” is my new mantra.

I needed to take a minute to sleep on how to review this one, because I was a ball of emotions after reading it. If you are following my reviews, yes, I am reading this backwards. Reading publications backwards is so great because you know where they are, and get to see where they grew from as a person and a writing.

Anyway. Last night while I was pondering over what to write as a review we were watching tv, and it was like 2:30 in the morning. Nicholi wanted to switch from Frasier and we couldn't decide what to switch to, and I was like we need a show that puts you to sleep. And he was unamused. But I was like we could put it in the corner, take it out when it's time for bed. Which just confused him more. So I added, it needs to be scared. Which caused me to laugh uncontrollably as I tried to tell him, that it needed to be scared because when we pull it out of the corner it knows you're going to fall asleep in it, so it needs to try it's best to keep you away because no show wants to be someone's fall asleep while watching it. But I don't think he understood because I was laughing so hard and he gave me the annoyed sigh, and said something about wasting five minutes. In that moment I realized that I am furiously happy.

Even when my depression and anxiety have taken over my mind completely and I am doing my best to not show everyone that I am falling apart, I have figured out the few random things that make me laugh hysterically. And I can be in that moment in spite of my demons trying to tell me that I'm not worthy of that single moment of happiness.

Us: 2, demons: -1. Because they should get points taken away when they try and "wreak havoc in our minds", not given to them.

This book hit me harder than [b:Broken|54305363|Broken (in the best possible way)|Jenny Lawson|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1597856341l/54305363._SY75_.jpg|84739109], and I think it's because this one is more focused on her struggles with depression and anxiety. For the first time, it really felt like someone understood what living with anxiety is like. I cried so much more while reading this once, just for the fact of being validated in my struggles. The way she can put mental illness into words that others can understand is awe-inspiring.

You will love this book if you love her blog. If you are a weirdo. If you suffer from depression or/and anxiety. If you need to escape into someone else's life for a bit? Whatever sinks, your submarine, I'm not hear to judge.

Quotes I want to remember:
"I wish someone had told me this simple but confusing truth: Even when everything’s going your way you can still be sad. Or anxious. Or uncomfortably numb. Because you can’t always control your brain or your emotions even when things are perfect. The really scary thing is that sometimes that makes it worse. You’re supposed to be sad when things are shitty, but if you’re sad when you have everything you’re ever supposed to want? That’s utterly terrifying."

"It is an amazing gift to be able to recognize that the things that make you the happiest are so much easier to grasp than you thought. There is such freedom in being able to celebrate and appreciate the unique moments that recharge you and give you peace and joy. Sure, some people want red carpets and paparazzi. Turns out I just want banana Popsicles dipped in Malibu rum. It doesn’t mean I’m a failure at appreciating the good things in life. It means I’m successful in recognizing what the good things in life are for me.”

“To all who walk the dark path, and to those who walk in the sunshine but hold out a hand in the darkness to travel beside us: Brighter days are coming. Clearer sight will arrive. And you will arrive too. No, it might not be forever. The bright moments might be for a few days at a time, but hold on for those days. Those days are worth the dark. In the dark you find yourself, all bones and exhaustion and helplessness. In the dark you find your basest self. In the dark you find the bottom of watery trenches the rest of the world only sees the surface of. You will see things that no normal person will ever see. Terrible things. Mysterious things. Things that try to burrow into your mind like a bad seed. Things that whisper dark and horrid secrets that you want to forget. Things that scream lies. Things that want you dead. Things that will stop at nothing to pull you down further and kill you in the most terrible way of all … by your own trembling hand. These things are fearsome monsters … the kind you always knew would sink in their needle-sharp teeth and pull you under the bed if you left a dangling limb out. You know they aren’t real, but when you’re in that black, watery hole with them they are the realest thing there is. And they want us dead. And sometimes they succeed. But not always. And not with you. You are alive. You have fought and battled them. You are scarred and worn and sometimes exhausted and were perhaps even close to giving up, but you did not. You have won many battles. There are no medals given out for these fights, but you wear your armor and your scars like an invisible skin, and each time you learn a little more. You learn how to fight. You learn which weapons work. You learn who your allies are. You learn that those monsters are exquisite liars who will stop at nothing to get you to surrender. Sometimes you fight valiantly with fists and words and fury. Sometimes you fight by pulling yourself into a tiny ball, blotting out the monsters along with the rest of the world. Sometimes you fight by giving up and turning it over to someone else who can fight for you. Sometimes you just fall deeper. And in the deepest, night-blind fathoms you’re certain that you’re alone. You aren’t. I’m there with you. And I’m not alone. Some of the best people are here too … feeling blindly. Waiting. Crying. Surviving. Painfully stretching their souls so that they can learn to breathe underwater … so that they can do what the monsters say is impossible. So that they can live. And so that they can find their way back to the surface with the knowledge of things that go bump in the night. So that they can dry themselves in the warm light that shines so brightly and easily for those above the surface. So that they can walk with others in the sunlight but with different eyes … eyes that still see the people underwater, allowing them to reach out into the darkness to pull up fellow fighters, or to simply hold their cold hands and sit beside the water to wait patiently for them to come up for air. Ground zero is where the normal people live their lives, but not us. We live in the negatives so often that we begin to understand that life when the sun shines should be lived full throttle, soaring. The invisible tether that binds the normal people on their steady course doesn’t hold us in the same way. Sometimes we walk in sunlight with everyone else. Sometimes we live underwater and fight and grow. And sometimes … … sometimes we fly.”

Notes: HP mentions. ( )
  SabethaDanes | Jan 30, 2023 |
My review of this book can be found on my YouTube Vlog at:

https://youtu.be/iGxa8igD2_o

Enjoy! ( )
  booklover3258 | Jan 7, 2023 |
There was a lot of great stuff in this book. Plenty of insightful discussions about mental illness, which is something that I've struggled with most of my life - not to the degree of the author but I could relate to some aspects of what she had to say. Most of the book is Lawson telling stories and sharing stream of consciousness essays. While I definitely enjoyed her sense of humor and found some of the stories interesting, her voice and repetitive nature of the jokes made the last half or so of the book sort of painful.

I think I would have enjoyed this one much more if I had limited myself to something like 30 minute sessions. Or I could be fooling myself and would have eventually just put it in the DNF pile. I got dangerously close to putting it there anyway but I'm determined to keep my total books completed numbers as high as possible this year. I WILL MAKE MY GOAL!

If you share a twisted sense of humor and love of foul language with the author, and me, and are interested in reading the book, I suggest trying a chapter or two a day.

I went back and forth between 2.5 and 3 stars. I decided on three because I really did laugh out loud a few times and some of her stories were very good. I was just too much of the same thing over and over to make it completely enjoyable for me. ( )
  amcheri | Jan 5, 2023 |
Generally liked it, but... If you're anything like me: Halfway through this book, you'll spot some sort of formula behind her stories, and it will feel tiresome to read any more of her stories. Mental illness can sometimes be funny, but it's not that funny, and honestly I just felt a little sorry for her husband Victor a lot of times from how she's depicting his reaction to her madness. ( )
  womanwoanswers | Dec 23, 2022 |
*NOTE: This book affected me on a personal level because I could relate to it. I’ll explain why first, before the review.*

My anxiety is a fairly recent development in my life. And maybe it’s really PTSD, but I’m choosing to go with anxiety. Just about three years ago (it’ll be actually three years on February 9th), my little Prius and I were struck by a tractor trailer on I-80 in Pennsylvania in the middle of a snow storm and I wound up stuck in a ditch, snow on either side, unable to get out of my car. I have never been more terrified in my life. My car absolutely saved my life.

And, I think most people would call this understandable, I started having panic attacks whenever I found myself in a less than comfortable driving situation. Full blown, cannot breathe, cannot feel my hands, feet, or face, panic attacks. Unfortunately, and less understandable to most people, my anxiety about driving started to seep into other (and all) facets of my life. Being diagnosed with allergy induced asthma last February didn’t help matters – now when I have an asthma attack I panic about not being able to breathe, and then I get to experience an asthma attack AND panic attack simultaneously. Isn’t that fun? No, it’s not, and the paramedics who had to try to regulate my breathing will back me up on this one.

Yes, yes, you’re probably thinking: Sarah, you know tons of people in the US suffer from anxiety and depression, right? Yes, your situation is not ideal, but other’s have it far worse. Yes, you’re absolutely right. And for all those people, and me, we have Jenny Lawson. And we are extremely lucky.

While Let’s Pretend This Never Happened, Jenny’s first book I reviewed last week, definitely falls into the memoir realm, Furiously Happy, straddles the genres of memoir and self-help. She doesn’t trivialize it any of the mental health issues she experiences, and she doesn’t discount anyone else’s. She doesn’t pretend to be an expert, she simply offers shared experiences. All with wit and humor that is unparelled to anything I’ve read before. ( )
  smorton11 | Oct 29, 2022 |
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This book is dedicated to my daughter, the giggling witness to the strange and wonderful world her family has created out of insanity (both real and hyperbolic).

God help us when she's old enough to write her own memoir.
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"In Furiously Happy, #1 New York Times bestselling author Jenny Lawson explores her lifelong battle with mental illness. A hysterical, ridiculous book about crippling depression and anxiety? That sounds like a terrible idea. But terrible ideas are what Jenny does best.As Jenny says: "Some people might think that being 'furiously happy' is just an excuse to be stupid and irresponsible and invite a herd of kangaroos over to your house without telling your husband first because you suspect he would say no since he's never particularly liked kangaroos. And that would be ridiculous because no one would invite a herd of kangaroos into their house. Two is the limit. I speak from personal experience. My husband says that none is the new limit. I say he should have been clearer about that before I rented all those kangaroos. "Most of my favorite people are dangerously fucked-up but you'd never guess because we've learned to bare it so honestly that it becomes the new normal. Like John Hughes wrote in The Breakfast Club, 'We're all pretty bizarre. Some of us are just better at hiding it.' Except go back and cross out the word 'hiding.'"Furiously Happy is about "taking those moments when things are fine and making them amazing, because those moments are what make us who we are, and they're the same moments we take into battle with us when our brains declare war on our very existence. It's the difference between "surviving life" and "living life". It's the difference between "taking a shower" and "teaching your monkey butler how to shampoo your hair." It's the difference between being "sane" and being "furiously happy."Lawson is beloved around the world for her inimitable humor and honesty, and in Furiously Happy, she is at her snort-inducing funniest. This is a book about embracing everything that makes us who we are - the beautiful and the flawed - and then using it to find joy in fantastic and outrageous ways. Because as Jenny's mom says, "Maybe 'crazy' isn't so bad after all." Sometimes crazy is just right"--

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