AccueilGroupesDiscussionsPlusTendances
Site de recherche
Ce site utilise des cookies pour fournir nos services, optimiser les performances, pour les analyses, et (si vous n'êtes pas connecté) pour les publicités. En utilisant Librarything, vous reconnaissez avoir lu et compris nos conditions générales d'utilisation et de services. Votre utilisation du site et de ses services vaut acceptation de ces conditions et termes
Hide this

Résultats trouvés sur Google Books

Cliquer sur une vignette pour aller sur Google Books.

Lookout Cartridge par Joseph McElroy
Chargement...

Lookout Cartridge (original 1974; édition 1985)

par Joseph McElroy

MembresCritiquesPopularitéÉvaluation moyenneMentions
1352156,680 (3.73)6
With Lookout Cartridge, Joseph McElroy established a reputation as one of contemporary fiction's foremost innovators and deft observers into the fissures of modern society. It is a novel of dazzling intricacy, absorbing suspense, and the highest ambition: to redeem the great claim of paranoia on the American psyche. In trying to figure out just who is so threatened by an innocent piece of cinema verité filmed in collaboration with a friend, Cartwright finds himself at the heart of a mystery stretching from New York and London to Corsica and Stonehenge. With each new fact he gathers, both the intricacy of the syndicate arrayed against him and what his search will cost him become alarmingly clear.… (plus d'informations)
Membre:rlunday
Titre:Lookout Cartridge
Auteurs:Joseph McElroy
Info:Carroll & Graf Pub (1985), Paperback, 531 pages
Collections:Votre bibliothèque
Évaluation:
Mots-clés:fiction, missing

Détails de l'œuvre

Lookout Cartridge par Joseph McElroy (1974)

Chargement...

Inscrivez-vous à LibraryThing pour découvrir si vous aimerez ce livre

Actuellement, il n'y a pas de discussions au sujet de ce livre.

» Voir aussi les 6 mentions

2 sur 2
Lookout Cartridge resists analysis. It doesn't lend itself to objective models. It lacks a core and periphery. There is little distinction between its exterior and the insular. Hell, as the pages turn, the narrative gathers matter , but not really force.

Where would this kinesis go? We measure in terms of plot development. Within these pages that activity remains suspect.

As pages are read, certain detail accumulate.

Could we be more specific?

Okay, the myriad project of representing reality repeats during the course of this forward reading. The Mercator Projection, the Mayan calendar and the enigma of Stonehenge are featured. These matters are explored, ruminated. How do we afford the aspects of flux to the static? Film uses edits for its gestalt. Painitng uses perspective.

Okay but as narrative project, what actually happens?

Two guys make a film, one of them keeps a diary of the process. Suddenly matters have turned a corner. Something untoward appears to be afoot. Data is flashed both forward and back through the narrative sequence, providing links if not elucidation. McElroy said somewhere that Lookout Cartridge is a computer. It processes imputs.

The name of Richard Nixon appears throughout the narrative, though Dick doesn't haunt like in Gravity's Rainbow. Speaking of paranoiac aesthetics, I found Lookout Cartridge is more Caché than Three Days of the Condor.

3.5/5 Though this reflects my own limitations, not those of the novel.
( )
  jonfaith | Feb 22, 2019 |

Cartwright, middle-aged businessman of questionable repute, and his friend Dagger, both Americans living in London, decided to make a film together. They shot about 10 scenes of the film and Cartwright kept a written diary of the shooting. But before the film could be processed, someone broke into Dagger's flat and destroyed most of it. This is the basic premise, or what we know up front. What follows is an ever-widening gyre of Cartwright's investigation into the circumstances surrounding the film's destruction, cut in with first-person reports of the shooting of key scenes in the film. These reports are Cartwright's dictations of his diary entries to his teenage daughter Jenny, though Cartwright the narrator also supplements the text with his recollections, interjecting to note when something was or was not included in the diary. Cartwright's narration of his own investigation (told in past tense) is also fluid, with frequent shifts in time and place, fueled by the fact that he travels back and forth between New York City and various places in the UK, sometimes in the same day.

Cartwright employs a rolling metaphor of film cartridges to place the action in perspective for himself and for the reader ('you who have me'), to whom he makes occasional brief asides. He repeats things, intriguing things, that may or may not be red herrings, and may or may not be worth keeping track of in order to chip away at the mystery. Fragments of past events slow-reveal, sometimes adding up to a whole. Mysterious and menacing characters lurk on both sides of the Atlantic. The film becomes something more than a film. Conspiratorial threads appear. Everyone knows a little or a lot, but no one seems to know it all. At times the plot operates like an elaborate and maddening game of Telephone. Cartwright and Dagger are at odds, each thinking the other is trying to co-opt the film, each unaware of what the other knows. As characters, they are both difficult to pin down. Since Cartwright is narrating, we only see Dagger through his eyes, so this portrait is uncertain. Cartwright had an idealistic vision for the film ('taking other energy in process and using it for our own peaceful ends'), whereas Dagger's possible ulterior motives materialize over time as the hinge on which the suspense swings.

The story pivots on information and power, namely how information empowers those who will wield it. It delves into methods for information acquisition and transfer, and how to use information once acquired, particularly to obtain yet more information. It also underscores the dangers (including for the reader) of information that is incomplete or out of context, and the frustration in not knowing the value of certain information one has that others seem to want. At one point late in the book, Cartwright laments (brags?), 'Information theory? I had none.' It's clear he's only been winging it thus far, but it's hard not to cheer for a guy getting by on instinct and a little luck. ( )
3 voter S.D. | Apr 5, 2014 |
2 sur 2
aucune critique | ajouter une critique

» Ajouter d'autres auteur(e)s

Nom de l'auteur(e)RôleType d'auteurŒuvre ?Statut
Joseph McElroyauteur(e) principal(e)toutes les éditionscalculé
Marcellino, FredArtiste de la couvertureauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Vous devez vous identifier pour modifier le Partage des connaissances.
Pour plus d'aide, voir la page Aide sur le Partage des connaissances [en anglais].
Titre canonique
Titre original
Titres alternatifs
Date de première publication
Personnes ou personnages
Lieux importants
Évènements importants
Films connexes
Prix et distinctions
Informations provenant du Partage des connaissances anglais. Modifiez pour passer à votre langue.
Épigraphe
Dédicace
Premiers mots
Citations
Derniers mots
Notice de désambigüisation
Directeur(-trice)(s) de publication
Courtes éloges de critiques
Langue d'origine
DDC/MDS canonique

Références à cette œuvre sur des ressources externes.

Wikipédia en anglais (2)

With Lookout Cartridge, Joseph McElroy established a reputation as one of contemporary fiction's foremost innovators and deft observers into the fissures of modern society. It is a novel of dazzling intricacy, absorbing suspense, and the highest ambition: to redeem the great claim of paranoia on the American psyche. In trying to figure out just who is so threatened by an innocent piece of cinema verité filmed in collaboration with a friend, Cartwright finds himself at the heart of a mystery stretching from New York and London to Corsica and Stonehenge. With each new fact he gathers, both the intricacy of the syndicate arrayed against him and what his search will cost him become alarmingly clear.

Aucune description trouvée dans une bibliothèque

Description du livre
Résumé sous forme de haïku

Vos raccourcis

Couvertures populaires

Évaluation

Moyenne: (3.73)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2
2.5
3 2
3.5 1
4 4
4.5 1
5 2

Est-ce vous ?

Devenez un(e) auteur LibraryThing.

 

À propos | Contact | LibraryThing.com | Respect de la vie privée et règles d'utilisation | Aide/FAQ | Blog | Boutique | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliothèques historiques | Critiques en avant-première | Partage des connaissances | 159,050,165 livres! | Barre supérieure: Toujours visible