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Sharpe's Eagle: Richard Sharpe and the…
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Sharpe's Eagle: Richard Sharpe and the Talavera Campaign, July 1809 (édition 2004)

par Bernard Cornwell (Auteur)

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1,483249,056 (4.04)60
The newly promoted Captain Richard Sharpe clashes with an incompetent colonel, leads his men in the battle of Talavera and earns himself a dangerous enemy. As Sharpe leads his men in to battle, he knows he must fight for the honour of the regiment and his future career. Soldier, hero, rogue - Sharpe is the man you always want on your side. Born in poverty, he joined the army to escape jail and climbed the ranks by sheer brutal courage. He knows no other family than the regiment of the 95th Rifles whose green jacket he proudly wears.… (plus d'informations)
Membre:BruneCoombsBookshelf
Titre:Sharpe's Eagle: Richard Sharpe and the Talavera Campaign, July 1809
Auteurs:Bernard Cornwell (Auteur)
Info:Berkley (2004), 270 pages
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Sharpe's Eagle par Bernard Cornwell

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Affichage de 1-5 de 24 (suivant | tout afficher)
The continuing saga... awesome. ( )
  rodweston | Apr 23, 2020 |
Will Sharpe prevail? Of course he will. Will he get the girl? Of course. Will he lose the girl? Uh huh. Will he get into trouble with British military command? You bet. Will he be in a big battle somewhere near the end of the book? You got it.

So okay, Cornwell writes formulaic books. I still love 'em. Sharpe is great, his adventures are exciting, and you actually learn some history. ( )
  JanetNoRules | Sep 17, 2018 |
Sharpe has finally made it to the Iberian Peninsular but he and his Riflemen have been put under the charge of a Regiment raised by a local landowner wanting to play colonel but no skill in military matters. And the less said about the so-called Spanish allies of the British as they attempt to force the French from Spain, the better. Colonel Simmerson finds his lack of experience coming to haunt him badly when he allows his regiment's colours fall into the hands of the French and in order to save his own position, Sharpe has to make good on his own boast that he would be able to take a French Eagle.

In this novel we get a feel of the confusion of this campaign where political expediency is allowed to trump military realities along with a cracking tale of chaotic fighting and loving. ( )
  JohnFair | Sep 10, 2017 |
I don't often encounter historical/military novels that themselves have a strong sense of prior history the way that Sharpe's Eagle has, for the Roman Empire strongly permeates the book, especially in its opening chapters.

We open with Sharpe and his rifle company* being drafted into yet another weird little scheme. An ancient Roman bridge crossing the river Tagus, a bridge that has stood strong for hundreds of years, has to go for strategic reasons, and Sharpe's friend and sort-of-commander, Captain Hogan, is the engineer who's going to do it. All fine and dandy. But the mission comes with certain... accompaniments.

A right upper class twit of a politically connected jerk has raised a brand new regiment back home and dedicated them to the cause in Spain and Portugal, and they're coming along in all their finery and splendor. The upper class twit thinking that it's more important that his soldiers look well than fight well and all, it's a pretty useless regiment but one that, maybe with some seasoning, might do all right if their Colonel, one Sir Henry Simmerson, doesn't get them killed first. Anyway, they're coming along for the bridge blowing party.

But because this is Spain and everything here is a matter of hidalgo honor, so is a fancy Spanish regiment, even shinier and fancier and more useless than the British noobs. "Hell's teeth," one of Sharpe's men observes on the approach of these military fops. "The fairies are on our side."

So, the early mission turns out not to be so straightforward after all. And that's before the French show up. Which shouldn't be a problem, as it's obvious to Sharpe it's a classic calvary vs infantry standoff, wherein no one has sufficient advantage to make it worthwhile to attack. Alas, this is not so obvious to the Colonel or his Spanish counterpart, who, in a scene of prolonged hilarity, pretty much provoke the French into massacre. And lose the regimental colors (the physical embodiment of a regiment's honor and pride the way a Roman legion's eagle was back in the day, and what the French still use for this purpose ca the early 1800s, and now the title of this novel makes all the sense in the world, don't it?) into the bargain.

That's all prologue. It establishes a new enemy for Sharpe in Colonel Simmerson, who needs a scapegoat for his enormous blunder and finds Sir Arthur Wellesley's favorite gotten-up, up-from-the-ranks officer a perfect candidate as much because Sharpe is a protege of Wellesley's as because Sharpe disobeyed an order in the middle of the debacle that was essentially for him and his men to commit suicide and make the French win all the faster (instead, Sharpe rescued one of Simmerson's colors and captured a French cannon, because Sharpe is awesome). When Wellesley promotes Sharpe to Captain and gives him command of a Battalion of Detachments, consisting of odds-and-ends groups like Sharpe's own fragment of a rifle company, and puts the survivors of Simmerson's regiment in that new Battalion, he's just painted the biggest political bullseye ever on Sharpe's back, and Sharpe is, of course, the last guy who'd ever want to be entangled in any politics at all. Especially the kind that can result in his being yanked out of the Peninsular War and deployed to the West Indies, to likely die of a tropical disease within a year of his arrival!

But so there's only one thing Sharpe can do to redeem himself from the results of his badassery: something even more badass, something no one has managed to do in this war: capture a French Eagle.

And of course he'll have to do this in one of the Peninsular War's biggest battles.

With Simmerson and his underlings (including an odious nephew, who is, of course, fighting with Sharpe over, of course, a beautiful woman) in tow.

And even more useless Spaniards mucking things up. Seriously, the Spanish army does not come off well in this novel! When they're not cocking up minor actions being show-offs, they're delaying major actions by oversleeping and letting the French gather up even more forces. And then there's bits like this, describing the aftermath of an ill-planned bout of shooting at some out-of-range Frenchmen:

"For a second Sharpe thought the Spanish were cheering their own victory over the innocent grass but suddenly he realised the shouts were not of triumph, but of alarm. They had been scared witless by their own volley, by the thunder of ten thousand muskets, and now they ran for safety. Thousands streamed into the olive trees, throwing away muskets, trampling the fires in their panic, screaming for help, heads up, arms pumping, running from their own noise."

I bet Spanish readers hate this book.**

But I, I loved it. I'm in serious danger, folks, between this and my re-read of the Aubrey/Maturin books, of making this as much a Summer of Napoleonic War Stories as a Summer of Jest!

Though I do sometimes wish Sharpe would stop taking justice into his own hands. Dude has almost as much cold blood on them as hot. Not cool, Richard. Not cool. As it were. Um. Please don't hurt me.

*Now a seriously rag-tag bunch of military orphans, whose regiment is back in England and who therefore cannot get new uniforms or boots or gear of any kind, even from the plentiful other fighting recipients of the King's Shilling who are still on the Iberian Peninsula, because no one wants to take on the bureaucratic headaches that would ensue if Sharpe's boys were given kit out of some other regiment's or division's stores.

**But, as Cornwell informs us in his traditional historical afterword, that incident really happened. ( )
  KateSherrod | Aug 1, 2016 |
An enjoyable read, but seemed a bit rushed compared to the previous books. I guess that's probably because it was the first book he wrote in the series. ( )
  quiBee | Jan 21, 2016 |
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Nom de l'auteur(e)RôleType d'auteurŒuvre ?Statut
Bernard Cornwellauteur(e) principal(e)toutes les éditionscalculé
Case, DavidNarrateurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
D'Achille, GinoArtiste de la couvertureauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Davidson, FrederickNarrateurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
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The newly promoted Captain Richard Sharpe clashes with an incompetent colonel, leads his men in the battle of Talavera and earns himself a dangerous enemy. As Sharpe leads his men in to battle, he knows he must fight for the honour of the regiment and his future career. Soldier, hero, rogue - Sharpe is the man you always want on your side. Born in poverty, he joined the army to escape jail and climbed the ranks by sheer brutal courage. He knows no other family than the regiment of the 95th Rifles whose green jacket he proudly wears.

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