AccueilGroupesDiscussionsExplorerTendances
Site de recherche
Ce site utilise des cookies pour fournir nos services, optimiser les performances, pour les analyses, et (si vous n'êtes pas connecté) pour les publicités. En utilisant Librarything, vous reconnaissez avoir lu et compris nos conditions générales d'utilisation et de services. Votre utilisation du site et de ses services vaut acceptation de ces conditions et termes.
Hide this

Résultats trouvés sur Google Books

Cliquer sur une vignette pour aller sur Google Books.

Chargement...

Pericles, Prince of Tyre

par William Shakespeare, George Wilkins (Auteur)

Autres auteurs: Voir la section autres auteur(e)s.

MembresCritiquesPopularitéÉvaluation moyenneMentions
1,3082711,625 (3.34)75
William Shakespeare (1564-1616) est considA(c)rA(c) comme la€(TM)un des plus grand poA]tes, dramaturges et A(c)crivains de la culture anglo-saxonne. Il est rA(c)putA(c) pour sa maA(R)trise des formes poA(c)tiques et littA(c)raires; sa capacitA(c) A reprA(c)senter les aspects de la nature humaine est souvent mise en avant par ses amateurs. Figure A(c)minente de la culture occidentale, Shakespeare continue da€(TM)influencer les artistes da€(TM)aujourda€(TM)hui. Il est traduit dans un grand nombre de langues et ses piA]ces sont rA(c)guliA]rement jouA(c)es partout dans le monde. Shakespeare est la€(TM)un des rares dramaturges A avoir pratiquA(c) aussi bien la comA(c)die que la tragA(c)die. Shakespeare A(c)crivit trentesept oeuvres dramatiques entre les annA(c)es 1580 et 1613. Mais la chronologie exacte de ses piA]ces est encore sujette A discussion. Cependant, le volume de ses crA(c)ations ne doit pas apparaA(R)tre comme exceptionnel en regard des standards de la€(TM)A(c)poque. Ses oeuvres comprennent: Jules CA(c)sar (1599), Comme Il Vous Plaira (1600), Hamlet (1600), Le Roi Lear (1606) et Macbeth (1606).… (plus d'informations)
  1. 00
    Sir Gawain and the Green Knight par Gawain Poet (EerierIdyllMeme)
    EerierIdyllMeme: Two works in older forms of English which play with forms from even older forms of English.
Chargement...

Inscrivez-vous à LibraryThing pour découvrir si vous aimerez ce livre

Actuellement, il n'y a pas de discussions au sujet de ce livre.

» Voir aussi les 75 mentions

Anglais (25)  Suédois (1)  Catalan (1)  Toutes les langues (27)
Affichage de 1-5 de 27 (suivant | tout afficher)
It's a retelling of an older story, as so often with Shakespeare, but he distills it down, then adds his own particular twist to the action. Pericles arrives at Antioch to pay court to the King's daughter, and is faced with a riddle that he has to solve in order to win the daughter. The answer is perilous and so he prevaricates, then runs away, pursued by a Lord of Antioch engaged to track him down & kill him (he doesn't try much beyond Act 1). Pericles leaves Tyre, to avoid pursuit, and arrives at Tarsus, bringing grain to the starving populace. From there he again sets sail and this time is shipwrecked. A group of fishermen save him and also drag ashore his armour form the sea. They tell him of a tournament being held by the local king and Pericles resolves to enter. He does and wins the daughter of the King, Thaisa.
They set sail again (sensing a theme here? Maybe the theatre had bought a job lot of blue material) and encounter a storm. Thaisa gives birth and seems to die. The sailors insist that the corpse be thrown overboard. From here on in it is a divergence before act 5 serves to tie the whole unlikely thing back together.
Thaisa isn't dead, drifts ashore, is found, revivied and, fearing Pericles dead, serves as a priestess to a temple to Diana.
(fast forward 14 odd years) Marina (the daughter) is left with Creon and his wife, only she outshines their daughter and so the resolves to send a man to kill her. He's foiled by a bunch of kidnapping pirates. Marina gets sold to a brothel owner, then manages to charm or cajole her way into keeping her virginity against all the odds. Creon & wife claim Marina is dead when Pericles visits (unclear quite what hes been up to all this time, Kinging in Tyre, we presume) he sets sail (again) in grief.
He arrives in Ephesus, mute in his grief, and is met by the local governor, who has previously been charmed by Marina (we'll gloss over the fact he was in a brothel and planning on deflowering a virgin. like you do). Marina is bought to Pericles and by telling their stories, they realise who the other is. After a dream sequence, where Diana appears to Pericles and tells him to go to the temple at Ephesus, Thaisa is also brought back into the fold.
There are plenty of characters and plenty of them are identikit. The ones that stand out are the common people, whose scenes have the feeling of the everyday, rather than the lords and ladies that populate the rest of the piece. The fishermen, the brothel keeper & his wife all feel like they are recognisable to the London of the time. They feel like a comic interlude to bring the tone back down to earth, they provide it with an earthiness.
This is a good listen. ( )
  Helenliz | Apr 19, 2022 |
This play was an emotional rollercoaster. Every time I thought, "Oh wow, Pericles' life can't get any worse/stranger/crazier," then my man Willy was like, "Watch this," and made things crazier!

Riddles about incest, resurrection of the dead, a proselytizing 'prostitute,' and FREAKING PIRATES!: This play has a little something for everybody! XD ( )
  djlinick | Jan 15, 2022 |
Plot: madcap. Writing: largely bad (thanks... Wilkins?) Read-aloud quality: superb. ( )
  misslevel | Sep 22, 2021 |
God, I hope there's some redemption in the few remaining works I have yet to experience. Because this one? It's simply awful for the most part.

Reading this one, one is led to believe that every daughter of a rich man must be attained by some stupid competition, and that every sea voyage ends up with you washed up on shore alone and almost dead, or plucked from the sea, almost dead.

Aside from that, there's some incest and prostitution and kidnapping and rape to keep you occupied.

It's just freaking awful.

With less than 20% left to go, I almost just stopped it and walked away, but I figured, why not finish it off? I'm glad I did, because only the ending managed to bring this up from no stars to two.

And I must say, while all the incidental music in the Arkangel productions is uniformly terrible, in this one, it was insufferably grating. I refuse to believe anyone on the production team ever listened to this and thought, "damn, this sounds great!

Because it doesn't. It's sandpaper for the ears. ( )
  TobinElliott | Sep 3, 2021 |
H1.31.4
  David.llib.cat | Oct 15, 2020 |
Affichage de 1-5 de 27 (suivant | tout afficher)
aucune critique | ajouter une critique

» Ajouter d'autres auteur(e)s (36 possibles)

Nom de l'auteur(e)RôleType d'auteurŒuvre ?Statut
Shakespeare, Williamauteur(e) principal(e)toutes les éditionsconfirmé
Wilkins, GeorgeAuteurauteur principaltoutes les éditionsconfirmé
Greg, W. W.Directeur de publicationauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Hoeniger, F.D.Directeur de publicationauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Rolfe, William JamesDirecteur de publicationauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Sagarra, Josep M.Traducteurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Warren, RogerDirecteur de publicationauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé

Est contenu dans

Fait l'objet d'une adaptation dans

A inspiré

Contient une étude de

Contient un guide de lecture pour étudiant

Vous devez vous identifier pour modifier le Partage des connaissances.
Pour plus d'aide, voir la page Aide sur le Partage des connaissances [en anglais].
Titre canonique
Informations provenant du Partage des connaissances anglais. Modifiez pour passer à votre langue.
Titre original
Titres alternatifs
Informations provenant du Partage des connaissances anglais. Modifiez pour passer à votre langue.
Date de première publication
Personnes ou personnages
Informations provenant du Partage des connaissances anglais. Modifiez pour passer à votre langue.
Lieux importants
Informations provenant du Partage des connaissances anglais. Modifiez pour passer à votre langue.
Évènements importants
Films connexes
Prix et distinctions
Épigraphe
Dédicace
Premiers mots
Informations provenant du Partage des connaissances anglais. Modifiez pour passer à votre langue.
To sing a song that old was sung,
From ashes ancient Gower is come;
Assuming man's infirmities,
To glad your ear, and please your eyes.
It hath been sung at festivals,
On ember-eves and holy-ales;
And lords and ladies in their lives
Have read it for restoratives:
The purchase is to make men glorious;
Et bonum quo antiquius, eo melius.
Citations
Derniers mots
Informations provenant du Partage des connaissances anglais. Modifiez pour passer à votre langue.
Notice de désambigüisation
Informations provenant du Partage des connaissances anglais. Modifiez pour passer à votre langue.
This work is for the complete Pericles, Prince of Tyre only. Do not combine this work with abridgements, adaptations or "simplifications" (such as "Shakespeare Made Easy"), Cliffs Notes or similar study guides, or anything else that does not contain the full text. Do not include any video recordings. Additionally, do not combine this with other plays.
Directeur(-trice)(s) de publication
Informations provenant du Partage des connaissances anglais. Modifiez pour passer à votre langue.
Courtes éloges de critiques
Langue d'origine
DDC/MDS canonique
LCC canonique

Références à cette œuvre sur des ressources externes.

Wikipédia en anglais

Aucun

William Shakespeare (1564-1616) est considA(c)rA(c) comme la€(TM)un des plus grand poA]tes, dramaturges et A(c)crivains de la culture anglo-saxonne. Il est rA(c)putA(c) pour sa maA(R)trise des formes poA(c)tiques et littA(c)raires; sa capacitA(c) A reprA(c)senter les aspects de la nature humaine est souvent mise en avant par ses amateurs. Figure A(c)minente de la culture occidentale, Shakespeare continue da€(TM)influencer les artistes da€(TM)aujourda€(TM)hui. Il est traduit dans un grand nombre de langues et ses piA]ces sont rA(c)guliA]rement jouA(c)es partout dans le monde. Shakespeare est la€(TM)un des rares dramaturges A avoir pratiquA(c) aussi bien la comA(c)die que la tragA(c)die. Shakespeare A(c)crivit trentesept oeuvres dramatiques entre les annA(c)es 1580 et 1613. Mais la chronologie exacte de ses piA]ces est encore sujette A discussion. Cependant, le volume de ses crA(c)ations ne doit pas apparaA(R)tre comme exceptionnel en regard des standards de la€(TM)A(c)poque. Ses oeuvres comprennent: Jules CA(c)sar (1599), Comme Il Vous Plaira (1600), Hamlet (1600), Le Roi Lear (1606) et Macbeth (1606).

Aucune description trouvée dans une bibliothèque

Description du livre
Résumé sous forme de haïku

Couvertures populaires

Vos raccourcis

Évaluation

Moyenne: (3.34)
0.5 1
1 4
1.5 1
2 18
2.5 4
3 52
3.5 15
4 36
4.5 3
5 18

Est-ce vous ?

Devenez un(e) auteur LibraryThing.

 

À propos | Contact | LibraryThing.com | Respect de la vie privée et règles d'utilisation | Aide/FAQ | Blog | Boutique | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliothèques historiques | Critiques en avant-première | Partage des connaissances | 169,950,186 livres! | Barre supérieure: Toujours visible