AccueilGroupesDiscussionsExplorerTendances
Site de recherche
Ce site utilise des cookies pour fournir nos services, optimiser les performances, pour les analyses, et (si vous n'êtes pas connecté) pour les publicités. En utilisant Librarything, vous reconnaissez avoir lu et compris nos conditions générales d'utilisation et de services. Votre utilisation du site et de ses services vaut acceptation de ces conditions et termes.
Hide this

Résultats trouvés sur Google Books

Cliquer sur une vignette pour aller sur Google Books.

Chargement...

Orphan Train (2013)

par Christina Baker Kline

Autres auteurs: Voir la section autres auteur(e)s.

MembresCritiquesPopularitéÉvaluation moyenneDiscussions / Mentions
5,2854361,614 (3.98)1 / 255
Entre 1854 et 1929, des trains sillonnaient les plaines du Midwest avec a leur bord des centaines d'orphelins. Au bout du voyage, la chance pour quelques-uns d'etre accueillis dans une famille aimante, mais pour beaucoup d'autres une vie de labeur, ou de servitude. Vivian Daly n'avait que neuf ans lorsqu'on l'a mise dans un de ces trains. Elle vit aujourd'hui ses vieux jours dans une bourgade tranquille du Maine, son lourd passe relegue dans de grandes malles au grenier. Jusqu'a l'arrivee de Mollie, dix-sept ans, sommee par le juge de nettoyer le grenier de Mme Daly, en guise de travaux d'interet general. Et contre toute attente, entre l'ado rebelle et la vieille dame se noue une amitie improbable. C'est qu'au fond, ces deux-la ont beaucoup plus en commun qu'il n'y parait, a commencer par une enfance devastee..."… (plus d'informations)
Récemment ajouté parEllemir, bibliothèque privée, kingmob2, Rennie8888
  1. 30
    Le treizième conte par Diane Setterfield (akblanchard)
    akblanchard: Isolated old ladies benefit by telling their stories to younger women.
  2. 41
    De l'eau pour les éléphants par Sara Gruen (Utilisateur anonyme)
    Utilisateur anonyme: Another good read showcasing a small bit of American history
  3. 10
    Le langage secret des fleurs par Vanessa Diffenbaugh (tangledthread)
    tangledthread: Similar story of a young woman aging out of the foster care system.
  4. 11
    My Notorious Life par Kate Manning (Utilisateur anonyme)
  5. 12
    Keeping Faith par Jodi Picoult (JenniferMCampbell)
Chargement...

Inscrivez-vous à LibraryThing pour découvrir si vous aimerez ce livre

» Voir aussi les 255 mentions

Anglais (428)  Espagnol (3)  Italien (2)  Allemand (2)  Néerlandais (1)  Toutes les langues (436)
Affichage de 1-5 de 436 (suivant | tout afficher)
4.5 stars! Very good book gvien to me by my book-loving cousin, who has bought several copies! Haha. I didn't know about this part of American history and was sad to learn of these little people being given to people who may only have wanted a field hand or someone to work for them, with no intention of actually adopting them. Interesting story lines of long ago orphan from Ireland and then more modern character who is in the system herself. Good read! Thanks Kelly! ( )
  BarbF410 | May 22, 2022 |
This was pretty interesting, I'm definitely going to look for more info about orphan trains. ( )
  AlexM12345 | Jan 5, 2022 |
Excellent, excellent, excellent. Told through two timelines, but they tie together seamlessly. We discover the older time line, from the elderly Vivian, who is recounting much of her (previously untold to anyone) history to struggling teenager Molly who is helping Vivian clean out her attic, as part of a community service program. Such an interesting time in history is revealed with tenderness and feeling. I love this book and plan to display it prominently on my bookshelf. ( )
  Desiree_Reads | Jan 3, 2022 |
What a fast read! That's not at all a comment on the quality, by the way--I just zipped through this one, for whatever reason.

I first saw this book on GoodReads, then found a bargain copy at a library sale. A god book that is definitely worth the read, though not earth-shattering. It'd be a good one to teach in high school, I think.

I couldn't put my finger on what it was about this book that kept me feeling just a little separated, but a colleague happened to hit the nail on the head while describing another book: It's very clearly the product of a creative writing professor. It's just a little too neat, too caught up in the deliberate style to really let loose and sink in. We need books like this--they show us all the wonderful things that writing and storytelling can be--but I didn't connect deeply.

That said, I definitely connected more to the modern main character than I did to the modern women in [b:The Joy Luck Club|7763|The Joy Luck Club|Amy Tan|https://d.gr-assets.com/books/1304978653s/7763.jpg|1955658]. Molly felt more real, more down-to-earth--the fact that she wasn't the beautiful, misunderstood Bella Swan type helped a lot. She bickered with her boyfriend, but they made up. They talked about the ways they couldn't meet each other as equals and how that made them feel. You can see how she became the person she is, not magically a saint and not willfully antagonistic.

Normally my primary interest would be with Niamh ("Neev"), as today's problems rarely seem as dire as the problems of the past. But in this book, it was actually the points where past met present that held me most. Maybe it was just my nostalgia for my own oral history class. If I thought I could make a living off it, I would loved to be a field anthropologist, interviewing new and interesting people from all walks of life. But it could also be because I've often connected well with people considerably older than I am--so I felt a kind of kinship with Molly, even if the connections I make tend to be much slower to form.

Yeah, there were some places that strained the suspension of disbelief. Molly seems to think she'll go to juvie for stealing a library book. Really? Even in our messed-up racist society, that seems a bit extreme for someone with no previous record. Molly's foster mother is conveniently antagonistic for no apparent reason--everyone has to have motivation of some sort. And a 91-year-old woman learns how to use a computer in a matter of weeks despite the fact that the most advanced technology in her house is a cordless phone--not impossible, but incredibly unlikely.

For some reason, I'm more forgiving of the coincidences in the "past" part of the narrative. Is it because that feels more like full-on story to me? I do think I tend to be more critical of books set in the present or near-present.

And that's it, folks, because I'm quite tired this evening. I miss doing my quotes, but they really did take up a LOT of time.

Bookmark: Hufflepuff ( )
  books-n-pickles | Oct 29, 2021 |
This book reads like a YA novel. It is funny that I read it right after I finished the Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky, and these two books couldn't be more different. Where the Russian tome is extremely long, thin on events and heavy on character dialogue, conversation and study, this one is short, and the "event" features as the main driver of the story while the characters are just serving as its results.

The history about the Orphan Train is interesting but I found the characters a bit on the exaggerated side. There are twin strands to the story. A modern-day young girl, who had a difficult childhood as a foster child and is close to ageing out of the foster care system. She faces some time of community work with an elderly lady, and an unlikely friendship develops when they discover the common threads that binds them. Vivian was also an orphan who arrived from the East Coast on the Orphan Train.

Some of the secondary characters were stereotypical, like the foster mother in the modern story. The last scenes in the book were something from a soap-opera. The writing is good but not spectacular. In all the story relies heavily on the drama of the orphan's life. The earlier years in Vivian's life (born Niamh in Galway Ireland) were most authentic and telling, and they alone carry the book.

One idea that I found interesting, is how people living in the worst of squalor found easy to look down and make racist comment on the poor little Irish girl. It is something that is difficult to understand logically, yet it always occurs in societies where the weak pries on the weaker and the weaker takes advantage of the weakest. ( )
  moukayedr | Sep 5, 2021 |
Affichage de 1-5 de 436 (suivant | tout afficher)

» Ajouter d'autres auteur(e)s

Nom de l'auteur(e)RôleType d'auteurŒuvre ?Statut
Christina Baker Klineauteur(e) principal(e)toutes les éditionscalculé
Almasy, JessicaNarrateurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Fröhlich, AnneÜbersetzerauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Guerrero, JavierTraducteurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Jansen, JanineConcepteur de la couvertureauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Kerner, Jamie LynnInterior Designauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Metaal, CarolienTraducteurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Sævold, Ann-MagrittOvers.auteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Thieme, Britt-Marieauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé
Toren, SuzanneNarrateurauteur secondairequelques éditionsconfirmé

Fait l'objet d'une adaptation dans

Vous devez vous identifier pour modifier le Partage des connaissances.
Pour plus d'aide, voir la page Aide sur le Partage des connaissances [en anglais].
Titre canonique
Informations provenant du Partage des connaissances anglais. Modifiez pour passer à votre langue.
Titre original
Titres alternatifs
Date de première publication
Personnes ou personnages
Informations provenant du Partage des connaissances anglais. Modifiez pour passer à votre langue.
Lieux importants
Informations provenant du Partage des connaissances anglais. Modifiez pour passer à votre langue.
Évènements importants
Informations provenant du Partage des connaissances anglais. Modifiez pour passer à votre langue.
Films connexes
Prix et distinctions
Informations provenant du Partage des connaissances anglais. Modifiez pour passer à votre langue.
Épigraphe
Informations provenant du Partage des connaissances anglais. Modifiez pour passer à votre langue.
In portaging from one river to another, Wabanakis had to carry their canoes and all other possessions. Everyone knew the value of traveling light and understood that it required leaving some things behind. Nothing encumbered movement more than fear, which was often the most difficult burden to surrender.
-Bunny McBride, Women of the Dawn
Dédicace
Informations provenant du Partage des connaissances anglais. Modifiez pour passer à votre langue.
To
Christina Looper Baker,
who handed me the thread,
and Carole Robertson Kline,
who gave me the cloth.
Premiers mots
Informations provenant du Partage des connaissances anglais. Modifiez pour passer à votre langue.
Prologue
I believe in ghosts.
Through her bedroom wall Molly can hear her foster parents talking about her in the living room, just beyond her door.
Citations
Informations provenant du Partage des connaissances anglais. Modifiez pour passer à votre langue.
"...you can't find peace until you find all the pieces."
– I learned long ago that loss is not only probable but inevitable. I know what it means to lose everything, to let go of one life and find another. And now I feel, with a strange, deep certainty, that it must be my lot in life to be taught that lesson over and over again.
Her hand flutters to her clavicle, to the silver chain around her neck, the Claddagh charm – those tiny hands clasping a crowned heart: love, loyalty, friendship – a never-ending path that leads away from home and circles back.
Derniers mots
Informations provenant du Partage des connaissances anglais. Modifiez pour passer à votre langue.
(Cliquez pour voir. Attention : peut vendre la mèche.)
Notice de désambigüisation
Directeur(-trice)(s) de publication
Courtes éloges de critiques
Informations provenant du Partage des connaissances anglais. Modifiez pour passer à votre langue.
Langue d'origine
Informations provenant du Partage des connaissances néerlandais. Modifiez pour passer à votre langue.
DDC/MDS canonique
LCC canonique

Références à cette œuvre sur des ressources externes.

Wikipédia en anglais

Aucun

Entre 1854 et 1929, des trains sillonnaient les plaines du Midwest avec a leur bord des centaines d'orphelins. Au bout du voyage, la chance pour quelques-uns d'etre accueillis dans une famille aimante, mais pour beaucoup d'autres une vie de labeur, ou de servitude. Vivian Daly n'avait que neuf ans lorsqu'on l'a mise dans un de ces trains. Elle vit aujourd'hui ses vieux jours dans une bourgade tranquille du Maine, son lourd passe relegue dans de grandes malles au grenier. Jusqu'a l'arrivee de Mollie, dix-sept ans, sommee par le juge de nettoyer le grenier de Mme Daly, en guise de travaux d'interet general. Et contre toute attente, entre l'ado rebelle et la vieille dame se noue une amitie improbable. C'est qu'au fond, ces deux-la ont beaucoup plus en commun qu'il n'y parait, a commencer par une enfance devastee..."

Aucune description trouvée dans une bibliothèque

Description du livre
Résumé sous forme de haïku

Couvertures populaires

Vos raccourcis

Évaluation

Moyenne: (3.98)
0.5
1 14
1.5
2 48
2.5 13
3 267
3.5 135
4 734
4.5 96
5 409

Est-ce vous ?

Devenez un(e) auteur LibraryThing.

 

À propos | Contact | LibraryThing.com | Respect de la vie privée et règles d'utilisation | Aide/FAQ | Blog | Boutique | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliothèques historiques | Critiques en avant-première | Partage des connaissances | 170,403,774 livres! | Barre supérieure: Toujours visible