taking a kick at a sonnet

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taking a kick at a sonnet

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1bookstopshere
Août 17, 2010, 12:44am

by all means, share a sonnet before I starve . . . or I'm forced to read Hopkins and die of feelings of inadequacy

2cheznomore
Août 18, 2010, 12:34pm

Every sonnet starts with a single line
And a rhyming scheme which it must obey.
In English, iambs still carry the day
And metrically pentameter is fine.
All we need is practice and a sign –
So caution – curves ahead – perhaps one way?
Or we’re resigned to ponder words at play -
Small wonder that the form is in decline.

Petrarch and his tongue’s too easy rhymes
Makes difficulties for the versifier,
But Shakespeare’s couplets have an easier time
And all the formal things that we require.
Still, any result may be quite sublime
And every poetaster an outliar.

3bookstopshere
Août 18, 2010, 3:26pm

ouch - I love that last line - LOL

sorry, it's a feedback loop . . .

What's on it?

Sonnets can tie knots when odd lines meet -
Sometimes the trying quest for the mot juste
Leaves us with a rhyme that's just a buste;
Sometimes the scansions off - or skips a beat -
And lurches like a drunk with two left feet.
But don't abandon ship or be non-plussed,
Each leap of faith just takes a bit of trust:
To be all that I amb is quite a feat.

oops - back to work - where's the verse in conversation?

4lorsomething
Août 18, 2010, 6:14pm

Right after the con? :)

5bookstopshere
Sep 8, 2010, 1:48pm

no swindling here (no con) - looking for someone to add the last 6 lines - Petrarch or Shakespeare?

who has the conn? any thoughts on the advantages/disadvantages of different sonnet schemes?