Photo de l'auteur
119+ oeuvres 21,528 utilisateurs 272 critiques 114 Favoris

A propos de l'auteur

When the National Theatre needed a last-minute substitute for a canceled production of As You Like It, Kenneth Tynan decided to stage Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, a work by an unfamiliar author that had received discouraging notices from provincial critics at its Edinburgh Festival debut. afficher plus Of course, the play, when it opened in April 1967, met with universal acclaim. In New York the next year, it was chosen best play by the Drama Critics Circle. In such an unlikely way, Tom Stoppard came to light. Born in Czechoslovakia, a country he left (for Singapore) when he was an infant, he began his literary career as a journalist in Bristol, where play reviewing led to playwriting. After Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, Stoppard's reputation suffered through the production of a number of minor works, whose intellectual preoccupations were shrugged off by reviewers: Enter a Free Man (1968; "an adolescent twinge of a play," N.Y. Times), The Real Inspector Hound (1968; "lightweight," N.Y. Times), and After Magritte. But in the 1970s, the initial enthusiasms aroused by Rosencrantz and Guildenstern were more than vindicated by the production of two full-length plays, Jumpers (1974) and the antiwar play Travesties (1975), whose immense verbal and theatrical inventiveness made them absolute successes on both sides of the Atlantic. Stoppard's method from the start has been to contrive explanations for highly unlikely encounters---of objects (the ironing board, old lady, and bowler hat of After Magritte), characters (Joyce, Lenin, and Tzara in Travesties), and even plays (Hamlet, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, The Importance of Being Earnest, Travesties, and The Real Thing, 1982). In the 1970s, Tynan called for Stoppard---as a Czech and as an artist---to engage himself politically. But although political subjects have since found their way into pieces from Every Good Boy Deserves Favor (1977) to Squaring the Circle (1985), politics and art seem to have become just two more of the playwright's irreconcilables, which meet, but never join, in the logical frames of his comedy. The presence of political material---such as the Lenin sections that nearly ruin the second part of Travesties---has occasionally strained the structure of the plays. But in The Real Thing Stoppard is comfortable enough with the satire on art and activism to bring a third subject, love, into the mix. Stoppard has acknowledged his Eastern European heritage nonpolitically, in a series of adaptations of plays by Arthur Schnitzler (see Vol. 2), Johann Nestroy, and Ferenc Molnar. (Bowker Author Biography) Tom Stoppard is the author of many plays, including Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, Jumpers, Travesties, and The Invention of Love. He lives in London. (Publisher Provided) afficher moins
Notice de désambiguation :

(dut) The author was born as Tomas Straussler. After the death of his father, his mother married the Brittish Major Stoppard, and Tom since accepted his name.

Séries

Œuvres de Tom Stoppard

Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead (1966) 8,065 exemplaires, 91 critiques
Arcadia (1993) 2,742 exemplaires, 54 critiques
Travesties (1974) 1,011 exemplaires, 12 critiques
The Real Thing (1982) 742 exemplaires, 8 critiques
The Invention of Love (1997) 717 exemplaires, 9 critiques
Jumpers (1972) 625 exemplaires, 5 critiques
Shakespeare in love (1998) — Screenwriter — 510 exemplaires, 9 critiques
Tom Stoppard Plays 5 (1978) 420 exemplaires, 5 critiques
The Coast of Utopia: Voyage, Shipwreck, Salvage (2003) 401 exemplaires, 2 critiques
Brazil (1985) — Screenwriter — 366 exemplaires, 4 critiques
The Real Inspector Hound (1976) 322 exemplaires, 6 critiques
Rock 'n' Roll: A New Play (2006) 316 exemplaires, 8 critiques
Shakespeare in Love: A Screenplay (1998) 293 exemplaires, 3 critiques
Lord Malquist & Mr Moon (1966) 239 exemplaires, 1 critique
Every Good Boy Deserves Favour and Professional Foul (1978) 238 exemplaires, 4 critiques
Hapgood (1988) 202 exemplaires, 5 critiques
Indian Ink (1995) 197 exemplaires, 3 critiques
Night and Day (1978) 178 exemplaires, 2 critiques
Voyage: The Coast of Utopia, Part I (2002) 175 exemplaires, 3 critiques
L'Empire du soleil (Empire of the Sun) (1987) — Screenwriter — 150 exemplaires, 3 critiques
Shipwreck: The Coast of Utopia, Part II (2002) 142 exemplaires, 3 critiques
Salvage: The Coast of Utopia, Part III (2002) 132 exemplaires, 1 critique
Rashomon; A Drama in Two Acts (1959) 123 exemplaires, 1 critique
Rosencrantz & Guildenstern are Dead [1990 film] (1990) — Directeur — 121 exemplaires
Dogg's Hamlet, Cahoot's Macbeth (1979) 119 exemplaires, 2 critiques
Anna Karenina [2012 film] (2012) — Screenwriter — 115 exemplaires, 2 critiques
Enter a Free Man (1968) 112 exemplaires, 1 critique
On the Razzle (1981) 108 exemplaires, 1 critique
Leopoldstadt (2020) 102 exemplaires, 4 critiques
Tom Stoppard Plays 4 (1999) 96 exemplaires
Artist Descending a Staircase (1973) 92 exemplaires
The Hard Problem (2015) 81 exemplaires, 2 critiques
Parade's End [2012 TV mini-series] (2012) 72 exemplaires, 1 critique
After Magritte (1971) 71 exemplaires
Conversations with Stoppard (1995) 68 exemplaires
Rough Crossing (1985) 66 exemplaires
Enigma [2001 film] (2002) — Screenwriter — 66 exemplaires, 2 critiques
La Maison Russie (The Russia House) (1990) — Screenwriter — 55 exemplaires
Albert's Bridge and Other Plays (1977) 52 exemplaires
Dalliance and Undiscovered Country (1986) 39 exemplaires
Albert et son pont (1969) 37 exemplaires
In the Native State (1991) 33 exemplaires
Squaring the Circle (1985) 32 exemplaires
If You're Glad I'll be Frank (1976) 31 exemplaires, 1 critique
Four Plays for Radio (1985) 26 exemplaires
Tulip Fever [2017 film] (2014) — Screenwriter — 24 exemplaires, 2 critiques
A Separate Peace (1977) 15 exemplaires
Darkside (2013) 14 exemplaires, 1 critique
Despair [1978 film] (1978) — Screenwriter — 13 exemplaires, 3 critiques
Billy Bathgate [1991 film] (1991) — Screenwriter — 12 exemplaires
Every Good Boy Deserves Favour (2018) 8 exemplaires
Poodle Springs [1998 film] (1998) — Writer — 7 exemplaires
Professional Foul (1979) 7 exemplaires
Tom Stoppard Radio Plays (2012) 5 exemplaires
Three Men in a Boat [1975 film] (1975) — Screenwriter — 4 exemplaires
The Dissolution of Dominic Boot (2012) 4 exemplaires
Where Are They Now? 4 exemplaires
The Boundary (1991) 4 exemplaires
Galileo 3 exemplaires
Dirty Linen and New-Found-Land (1976) 3 exemplaires
Modern One-act Plays (1993) 3 exemplaires, 1 critique
Travesties [theatre programme] — Contributeur — 1 exemplaire
Neutral Ground 1 exemplaire
Arcadia: Arena Stage 1 exemplaire
New-Found-Land 1 exemplaire
Dogg's Hamlet 1 exemplaire
Cahoot's Macbeth 1 exemplaire
Teeth 1 exemplaire
TOPLU OYUNLARI 3 1 exemplaire
Hapgood ; Rock and roll (2007) 1 exemplaire
Pirandell's Henry IV 1 exemplaire, 1 critique
The coast of Utopia (2003) 1 exemplaire
Dirty Linen 1 exemplaire
Tm Oyunlar II 1 exemplaire
La invención del amor (2000) 1 exemplaire
Penelope (2022) 1 exemplaire
TOPLU OYUNLARI 1 1 exemplaire

Oeuvres associées

La Cerisaie (1904) — Adapter, quelques éditions1,606 exemplaires, 24 critiques
La Mouette (1896) — Traducteur, quelques éditions1,134 exemplaires, 20 critiques
The Pleasure of Reading (1992) — Contributeur — 189 exemplaires, 8 critiques
Nine Plays of the Modern Theater (1981) — Contributeur — 185 exemplaires, 1 critique
Masterpieces of the Drama (1966) — Contributeur — 180 exemplaires, 2 critiques
Ivanov (1974)quelques éditions169 exemplaires, 7 critiques
Counting My Chickens . . .: And Other Home Thoughts (2001) — Introduction — 157 exemplaires, 2 critiques
Largo Desolato (1987) — Traducteur, quelques éditions151 exemplaires, 1 critique
Henri IV (1922) — Traducteur, quelques éditions120 exemplaires, 3 critiques
Know the Past, Find the Future: The New York Public Library at 100 (2011) — Contributeur — 118 exemplaires, 3 critiques
Granta 119: Britain (2012) — Contributeur — 110 exemplaires
Undiscovered Country (1911) — Traducteur, quelques éditions76 exemplaires, 1 critique
What's Your Story? Postcard Collection (2008) — Contributeur — 62 exemplaires, 3 critiques
Modern and Contemporary Drama (1958) — Contributeur — 43 exemplaires, 1 critique
Writers under Siege: Voices of Freedom from around the World (2007) — Avant-propos — 19 exemplaires
Doing It: Five Performing Arts (2001) — Contributeur — 19 exemplaires
Contemporary one-act plays (1976) — Contributeur — 17 exemplaires
Another Sky: Voices of Conscience from Around the World (2007) — Introduction — 14 exemplaires
Die englische Literatur in Text und Darstellung, 20 Jhdt.II (2001) — Contributeur — 6 exemplaires
The Best Plays Theater Yearbook 2007-2008 (2009) — Contributeur — 5 exemplaires, 1 critique
The hard problem : 2015 [theatre programme] (2015) — Contributeur — 2 exemplaires

Étiqueté

Partage des connaissances

Nom légal
Straussler, Tomas
Stoppard, Tom
Autres noms
Boot, William
Date de naissance
1937-07-03
Sexe
male
Nationalité
UK
Lieu de naissance
Zlín, Czechoslovakia
Lieux de résidence
Zlín, Czechoslovakia (birth)
Singapore
Darjeeling, India
Bristol, Gloucestershire, England, UK
London, England, UK
Études
Mount Hermon School
Dolphin School, Nottinghamshire, England, UK
Pocklington School, Yorkshire, England, UK
Professions
playwright
screenwriter
translator
journalist
drama critic
Relations
Stoppard, Miriam (wife|divorced)
Organisations
Western Daily Press (reporter ∙ critic)
Bristol Evening World (feature writer ∙ humor columnist ∙ drama critic)
BBC Radio
Standpoint
Shakespeare Schools Festival
Index on Censorship (tout afficher 9)
Amnesty International
Committee Against Psychiatric Abuse
The London Library (president)
Prix et distinctions
Order of Merit (2000)
Commander, Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (1978)
Knight Bachelor (1997)
Fellow, Royal Society of Literature (1972)
American Academy of Arts and Letters (2000)
Honorary Fellow, British Academy (2017) (tout afficher 24)
PEN Pinter prize (2013)
David Cohen Prize (2017)
PEN/Allen Foundation Literary Service Award (2015)
America Award in Literature (2017)
Laurel Award for Screenwriting Achievement (2013)
American Theater Hall of Fame (1999)
BAFTA for Best Original Screenplay (1999)
Writers' Guild of Great Britain Award (2017)
Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay (1998)
The London Library (2002)
Tony Award for Best Play (1968, 1976, 1984, 2007, 2023)
Laurence Olivier Award (1994, 2006, 2020)
John Whiting Award (1967)
Golden Globe for Best Screenplay (1998)
Dan David Prize (2008)
Honorary doctorate, Yale University (2000)
Honorary degree, Cambridge University (2000)
Honorary Patronage, University Philosophical Society, Trinity College, Dublin
Agent
Anthony Jones (PFD)
Courte biographie
Tom Stoppard was born Tomáš Straussler to a Jewish family in Zlín, Czechoslovakia. With their parents Eugen Straussler, a doctor employed by the Bata shoe company, and Martha Becková, he and his brother fled the country in 1939 to escape Nazi occupation. \The family went to Singapore, where Bata had a factory. Tom, his mother and brother fled to Australia in 1941. Tom spent three years in a boarding school in Darjeeling, India. In 1945, his mother married Kenneth Stoppard. Tom attended the Dolphin School in Nottinghamshire, and later Pocklington School in Yorkshire. He left school at age 17 and began working as a journalist for the Western Daily Press in Bristol. IHe also wrote short radio plays and in 1960, moved to London and launched himself as a playwright with A Walk on the Water, later re-titled Enter a Free Man.
Notice de désambigüisation
The author was born as Tomas Straussler. After the death of his father, his mother married the Brittish Major Stoppard, and Tom since accepted his name.

Membres

Critiques

Tom Stoppard, dramaturge britannique, a décidé quand j’avais dix ans d’écrire une pièce de théâtre rien que moi, une pièce que je lirais quand j’en aurais trente. Jugez plutôt ! Cette pièce aborde énormément de thèmes : littérature anglais du 19ième siècle à travers la personne de Lord Byron, jeux littéraires, mathématiques, informatique, programmations, découverte scientifique, monde universitaire, publication, algorithmes.

Plus sérieusement, il a fallu que je traîne au rayon littérature en anglais de Gibert, au 4ième étage du magasin de Paris, pour entendre pour la première fois de cette pièce et de son auteur. Il se trouve que ce texte est au programme de l’agrégation d’anglais 2012. Comme rien ne me fait peur, j’ai commencé par lire ce livre en anglais. Cela se comprend plutôt bien mais il y a quand même énormément de vocabulaire que je ne connaissais pas, ce qui n’a pas rendu ma lecture fluide. Je l’ai donc relu ensuite en français.

Plantons le décor. “Une grande pièce donnant sur un parc dans une propriété du Derbyshire.” “Portes fenêtres, hautes fenêtres sans rideaux.” “On n’a pas forcément besoin d’avoir un aperçu du parc : idée de lumière, d’espace, de ciel ouvert.” Dans mon imagination, cela correspond exactement à Pemberley. J’espère que dans la vôtre aussi. Toute l’histoire se passe dans cette pièce.

Le texte est divisé en deux actes, sept scènes et se déroule sur deux périodes : une période moderne et un période ancienne, avril 1809 et trois ans plus tard.

La scène 1 s’ouvre donc en avril 1809. Septimus Hodge, 22 ans, est le précepteur de Thomasina Coverly, 13 ans, fille des propriétaires des lieux. Chacun est d’un côte d’une grande table. Septimus est en train de lire de la poésie tandis que Thomasina se concentre sur son livre de mathématiques et la démonstration du théorème de Fermat. Tom Stoppard a fait de la jeune fille un génie scientifique qui a une très bonne intuition des phénomènes, que d’autres n’appréhenderont que deux siècles plus tard. Septimus se consacre à la lecture de la poésie d’un invité du domaine, Ezra Chater, qui visiblement n’est pas brillante. Thomasina interrompt ce silence studieux pour demander à Septimus le sens de l’expression “étreinte charnelle”. En effet, elle a surpris Jellaby, le majordome, parler de cela avec la cuisinière à propos de la femme du poète Chater et d’un homme. Il s’avère que cet homme est Septimus, ce que Thomasina ignore bien évidemment. Septimus est donc en délicatesse avec le poète qui vient lui demander en pleine leçon une explication, quitte à en venir au duel.

SEPTIMUS. Je vous assure. Madame Chater est très avenante et spirituelle, avec un port élégant, une voix charmante : elle résume les qualités que le monde aime à voir dans le beau sexe. Mais ce qui fait sa gloire c’est cet état d’alerte permanent qui la maintient dans une espèce de moiteur tropicale propre à faire pousser sous ses jupes des orchidée en plein mois de janvier.

CHATER. Taisez-vous, Duncan [Hodge dans la version anglaise] ! Je ne vais pas souffrir plus loin votre insolence ! Vous battrez-vous, oui ou non ?

SEPTIMUS. Non. Il ne nous reste guère que deux ou trois poètes d’envergure, je ne vais pas courir le risque d’en expédier un ad patres pour un incident de kiosque avec une femme dont une compagnie de mousquetaires ne suffirait pas à défendre la réputation.

Là-dessus intervient Lady Croom la mère de Thomasina en plein tourment car Noakes, jardinier, est en train de lui saboter son jardin classique en jardin digne des Mystères d’Udolphe. Il y a aussi le Capitaine Brice, le frère de Lady Croom qui intervient. Celui-ci aime aussi Mme Chater, voit donc Septimus comme un ennemi et monte Chater contre-lui.

Dans la scène 3, on apprendra que Lord Byron est aussi présent dans le domaine ainsi que le père et le frère de Thomasina. Cela fait beaucoup de testostérone dans un environnement où il y a une femme très ouverte aux propositions et une Lady Croom qui n’aime pas beaucoup qu’on lui fasse de l’ombre. 1809 correspond aussi à l’année où Byron est parti d’Angleterre pour deux ans. De là à dire qu’il y a un rapport …

… il n’y a qu’un pas qui sera franchi dans la partie moderne de la pièce, qui alterne avec la partie ancienne.

L’action se situe dans la même pièce, qui n’est plus une salle d’étude, mais un lieu de passage entre la maison et le jardin. On y garde cependant les archives du domaine. C’est là qu’on croise à la scène 2 Bernard Nightingale, universitaire dont le sujet de recherche est Lord Byron. Il pense avoir trouvé une piste inédite. Il aurait identifié des critiques inédites de l’auteur et en plus, il serait capable d’expliquer pourquoi Byron a quitté l’Angleterre en 1809.

Il vient essayer de confirmer sa piste en consultant les archives et surtout Hannah Jarvis qui travaille aussi sur le l’histoire du domaine, en particulier sur son jardin et ses modifications successives. Elle travaille aussi sur l’identité de l’ermite qui a habité l’ermitage aménagé par le jardinier-paysagiste Noakes. Alors que la théorie de Bernard n’est confirmé par aucun élément probant, il s’y engouffre sans même considérer d’autres interprétations tout aussi plausibles suggérées par Hannah qui est dans ce cas la voix de la raison. Il veut ABSOLUMENT publier rapidement pour être reconnu par ses pairs. Devant l’explication scandaleuse qu’il propose, il publiera même d’abord dans un journal à scandale. Le texte illustre bien le processus de recherche universitaire pour certains, un processus guidé plutôt par la reconnaissance que la connaissance, quitte à se fourvoyer.

Dans cette partie interviennent aussi les trois enfants du domaines dont deux sont particulièrement marquants.

Il y a Chloë Coverly, 18 ans, jeune fille en quête d’amour, de sensationnel, un peu évaporé sur les bords et qui semble sérieusement manqué d’éducation. Elle s’attachera donc forcément à Bernard dans la pièce.

Il y a aussi Valentine Coverly, 25-30 ans, étudiant (ou chercheur) en informatique. Il se penche sur les travaux de son aïeule et découvre que celle-ci était un génie uniquement bloqué par les moyens de calcul mis à sa disposition (elle n’avait pas l’informatique à l’époque). Alors que son travail à lui est imputable, son travail à elle l’est et est en plus remarquable. J’ai trouvé ce type de discours très intéressant. L’informatique ne peut pas résoudre tous les problèmes s’il n’y a pas un cerveau humain derrière. En clair, on ne peut pas mettre toutes les données dans l’ordinateur et attendre qu’il sorte la solution. L’ordinateur n’est qu’un moyen. On peut même se resservir de ce que d’autres ont fait si c’est pertinent (et là j’ai souri parce que dans mon travail on m’a expliqué deux fois le contraire, comme si une théorie mathématique pouvait avoir une date de péremption).

ArcadiaTomStoppardFrancaisCe que j’ai énormément aimé c’est la manière très intelligente dont une partie renvoie à l’autre, ainsi que l’ensemble es réflexions porté par le texte. Le texte ne fait qu’une centaine de pages et il y a une multitude de thèmes qui sont abordés Tout est brillant ! Jusqu’à la tortue qui se retrouve dans les deux époques de la pièce.

Pour l’adaptation, la première chose que l’on constate est que Jean-Marie Besset a commencé par francisé les noms : Valentine est devenu Valentin (je trouve que c’est très bien car dans ma première lecture, j’avais d’abord pensé que c’était une fille), Hannah est devenue Anna, Lady Croom est devenue Lady Gray, Septimus Hodge est devenu Septimus Duncan. Cette seconde lecture en français m’a permis de me rendre compte de la grossièreté de certains échanges dans la partie moderne de la pièce de théâtre. Par contre, les échanges dans la partie ancienne m’ont semblé plus drôles, plus ironiques, plus humour anglais en anglais qu’en français. Septimus Hodge en particulier. Il semble déférent, sans impertinence envers la famille qui l’emploie, sans montrer d’esprit (en tout cas autant qu’en anglais). Pour une troisième lecture, je pense que je lirais les deux textes pour les comparer et comprendre le travail d’adaptation et non de traduction de Jean-Marie Besset.

J’espère vous avoir donné envie de lire cette pièce génialissime ! Peut-être même l’avez-vous déjà lu ? vu ?
… (plus d'informations)
 
Signalé
CecileB | 53 autres critiques | Feb 10, 2013 |
Tom Stoppard, dramaturge britannique, a décidé quand j’avais dix ans d’écrire une pièce de théâtre rien que moi, une pièce que je lirais quand j’en aurais trente. Jugez plutôt ! Cette pièce aborde énormément de thèmes : littérature anglais du 19ième siècle à travers la personne de Lord Byron, jeux littéraires, mathématiques, informatique, programmations, découverte scientifique, monde universitaire, publication, algorithmes.

Plus sérieusement, il a fallu que je traîne au rayon littérature en anglais de Gibert, au 4ième étage du magasin de Paris, pour entendre pour la première fois de cette pièce et de son auteur. Il se trouve que ce texte est au programme de l’agrégation d’anglais 2012. Comme rien ne me fait peur, j’ai commencé par lire ce livre en anglais. Cela se comprend plutôt bien mais il y a quand même énormément de vocabulaire que je ne connaissais pas, ce qui n’a pas rendu ma lecture fluide. Je l’ai donc relu ensuite en français.

Plantons le décor. “Une grande pièce donnant sur un parc dans une propriété du Derbyshire.” “Portes fenêtres, hautes fenêtres sans rideaux.” “On n’a pas forcément besoin d’avoir un aperçu du parc : idée de lumière, d’espace, de ciel ouvert.” Dans mon imagination, cela correspond exactement à Pemberley. J’espère que dans la vôtre aussi. Toute l’histoire se passe dans cette pièce.

Le texte est divisé en deux actes, sept scènes et se déroule sur deux périodes : une période moderne et un période ancienne, avril 1809 et trois ans plus tard.

La scène 1 s’ouvre donc en avril 1809. Septimus Hodge, 22 ans, est le précepteur de Thomasina Coverly, 13 ans, fille des propriétaires des lieux. Chacun est d’un côte d’une grande table. Septimus est en train de lire de la poésie tandis que Thomasina se concentre sur son livre de mathématiques et la démonstration du théorème de Fermat. Tom Stoppard a fait de la jeune fille un génie scientifique qui a une très bonne intuition des phénomènes, que d’autres n’appréhenderont que deux siècles plus tard. Septimus se consacre à la lecture de la poésie d’un invité du domaine, Ezra Chater, qui visiblement n’est pas brillante. Thomasina interrompt ce silence studieux pour demander à Septimus le sens de l’expression “étreinte charnelle”. En effet, elle a surpris Jellaby, le majordome, parler de cela avec la cuisinière à propos de la femme du poète Chater et d’un homme. Il s’avère que cet homme est Septimus, ce que Thomasina ignore bien évidemment. Septimus est donc en délicatesse avec le poète qui vient lui demander en pleine leçon une explication, quitte à en venir au duel.

SEPTIMUS. Je vous assure. Madame Chater est très avenante et spirituelle, avec un port élégant, une voix charmante : elle résume les qualités que le monde aime à voir dans le beau sexe. Mais ce qui fait sa gloire c’est cet état d’alerte permanent qui la maintient dans une espèce de moiteur tropicale propre à faire pousser sous ses jupes des orchidée en plein mois de janvier.

CHATER. Taisez-vous, Duncan [Hodge dans la version anglaise] ! Je ne vais pas souffrir plus loin votre insolence ! Vous battrez-vous, oui ou non ?

SEPTIMUS. Non. Il ne nous reste guère que deux ou trois poètes d’envergure, je ne vais pas courir le risque d’en expédier un ad patres pour un incident de kiosque avec une femme dont une compagnie de mousquetaires ne suffirait pas à défendre la réputation.

Là-dessus intervient Lady Croom la mère de Thomasina en plein tourment car Noakes, jardinier, est en train de lui saboter son jardin classique en jardin digne des Mystères d’Udolphe. Il y a aussi le Capitaine Brice, le frère de Lady Croom qui intervient. Celui-ci aime aussi Mme Chater, voit donc Septimus comme un ennemi et monte Chater contre-lui.

Dans la scène 3, on apprendra que Lord Byron est aussi présent dans le domaine ainsi que le père et le frère de Thomasina. Cela fait beaucoup de testostérone dans un environnement où il y a une femme très ouverte aux propositions et une Lady Croom qui n’aime pas beaucoup qu’on lui fasse de l’ombre. 1809 correspond aussi à l’année où Byron est parti d’Angleterre pour deux ans. De là à dire qu’il y a un rapport …

… il n’y a qu’un pas qui sera franchi dans la partie moderne de la pièce, qui alterne avec la partie ancienne.

L’action se situe dans la même pièce, qui n’est plus une salle d’étude, mais un lieu de passage entre la maison et le jardin. On y garde cependant les archives du domaine. C’est là qu’on croise à la scène 2 Bernard Nightingale, universitaire dont le sujet de recherche est Lord Byron. Il pense avoir trouvé une piste inédite. Il aurait identifié des critiques inédites de l’auteur et en plus, il serait capable d’expliquer pourquoi Byron a quitté l’Angleterre en 1809.

Il vient essayer de confirmer sa piste en consultant les archives et surtout Hannah Jarvis qui travaille aussi sur le l’histoire du domaine, en particulier sur son jardin et ses modifications successives. Elle travaille aussi sur l’identité de l’ermite qui a habité l’ermitage aménagé par le jardinier-paysagiste Noakes. Alors que la théorie de Bernard n’est confirmé par aucun élément probant, il s’y engouffre sans même considérer d’autres interprétations tout aussi plausibles suggérées par Hannah qui est dans ce cas la voix de la raison. Il veut ABSOLUMENT publier rapidement pour être reconnu par ses pairs. Devant l’explication scandaleuse qu’il propose, il publiera même d’abord dans un journal à scandale. Le texte illustre bien le processus de recherche universitaire pour certains, un processus guidé plutôt par la reconnaissance que la connaissance, quitte à se fourvoyer.

Dans cette partie interviennent aussi les trois enfants du domaines dont deux sont particulièrement marquants.

Il y a Chloë Coverly, 18 ans, jeune fille en quête d’amour, de sensationnel, un peu évaporé sur les bords et qui semble sérieusement manqué d’éducation. Elle s’attachera donc forcément à Bernard dans la pièce.

Il y a aussi Valentine Coverly, 25-30 ans, étudiant (ou chercheur) en informatique. Il se penche sur les travaux de son aïeule et découvre que celle-ci était un génie uniquement bloqué par les moyens de calcul mis à sa disposition (elle n’avait pas l’informatique à l’époque). Alors que son travail à lui est imputable, son travail à elle l’est et est en plus remarquable. J’ai trouvé ce type de discours très intéressant. L’informatique ne peut pas résoudre tous les problèmes s’il n’y a pas un cerveau humain derrière. En clair, on ne peut pas mettre toutes les données dans l’ordinateur et attendre qu’il sorte la solution. L’ordinateur n’est qu’un moyen. On peut même se resservir de ce que d’autres ont fait si c’est pertinent (et là j’ai souri parce que dans mon travail on m’a expliqué deux fois le contraire, comme si une théorie mathématique pouvait avoir une date de péremption).

ArcadiaTomStoppardFrancaisCe que j’ai énormément aimé c’est la manière très intelligente dont une partie renvoie à l’autre, ainsi que l’ensemble es réflexions porté par le texte. Le texte ne fait qu’une centaine de pages et il y a une multitude de thèmes qui sont abordés Tout est brillant ! Jusqu’à la tortue qui se retrouve dans les deux époques de la pièce.

Pour l’adaptation, la première chose que l’on constate est que Jean-Marie Besset a commencé par francisé les noms : Valentine est devenu Valentin (je trouve que c’est très bien car dans ma première lecture, j’avais d’abord pensé que c’était une fille), Hannah est devenue Anna, Lady Croom est devenue Lady Gray, Septimus Hodge est devenu Septimus Duncan. Cette seconde lecture en français m’a permis de me rendre compte de la grossièreté de certains échanges dans la partie moderne de la pièce de théâtre. Par contre, les échanges dans la partie ancienne m’ont semblé plus drôles, plus ironiques, plus humour anglais en anglais qu’en français. Septimus Hodge en particulier. Il semble déférent, sans impertinence envers la famille qui l’emploie, sans montrer d’esprit (en tout cas autant qu’en anglais). Pour une troisième lecture, je pense que je lirais les deux textes pour les comparer et comprendre le travail d’adaptation et non de traduction de Jean-Marie Besset.

J’espère vous avoir donné envie de lire cette pièce génialissime ! Peut-être même l’avez-vous déjà lu ? vu ?
… (plus d'informations)
 
Signalé
CecileB | 53 autres critiques | Feb 10, 2013 |
J'ai vu cette pièce au Danemark et je viens de découvrir qu'elle est en anglais à l'origine... C'est du théâtre de l'absurde: deux hommes sont dans une gare, se demandent qui ils sont et ce qu'ils font là. Des personnes arrivent, leur parlent, et peu à peu ils découvrent qu'ils s'appellent Rosencrantz et Guildenstern et qu'ils sont des amis de Hamlet. Pour comprendre, il faut imaginer Hamlet vu du point de vue de ces personnages secondaires. Ils finnissent par se demander ce qu'on attend d'eux, ce qu'ils doivent faire en tant que personnages secondaires, et s'ils sont vraiment vivants... Bon après j'ai peut-etre mal compris car mon danois est un epu limité !… (plus d'informations)
 
Signalé
Alice19 | 90 autres critiques | May 29, 2006 |

Listes

Prix et récompenses

Vous aimerez peut-être aussi

Auteurs associés

Marc Norman Screenwriter
Charles McKeown Screenwriter
Terry Gilliam Screenwriter
Sue Hodge Actor
Roger Pratt Cinematographer
Ann Way Actor
Ian Holm Actor
Michael Kamen Composer
Arnon Milchan Producer
Allen Daviau Cinematographer
J. G. Ballard Original book
John Williams Composer
Menno Meyjes Writer (uncredited)
Tim Roth Actor
Iain Glen Actor
Jude Law Actor
Robert Harris Original book
James Fox Actor
Deborah Moggach Original book
Vladimer Nabokov Original book
Tom Bower Actor
Tim Curry Actor
Màrius Serra Translator
Marc Murphy Contributor
Al Senter Contributor
James Joyce Contributor

Statistiques

Œuvres
119
Aussi par
24
Membres
21,528
Popularité
#1,003
Évaluation
4.0
Critiques
272
ISBN
381
Langues
14
Favoris
114

Tableaux et graphiques